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Sartre and freedom

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  • CELESTE WALSH
    Having been a silent onlooker for a while I was wondering if you would mind if I bounced an idea off you. Sartre s redefinition of freedom to something that is
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 5, 1999
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      Having been a silent onlooker for a while
      I was wondering if you would mind if I bounced an idea off you.

      Sartre's redefinition of freedom to something that is on the strength of a
      situation and non-quantitative, was developed in order to emphasise the
      absolute responsibility we have to create meaning for ourself, and hence
      define our essence through existence.

      His theories on freedom maintained that no external situation can undermine
      the absolute freedom we have to make a particular choice.

      I would like to suggest that while no external situations should limit our
      freedom, is there a possibility that the various upsurges of freedom we use
      to interpret a situation may distort each other. For example, if we look at
      the example of the rocky crag. My primary interpretation of the crag is
      something I would love to climb. However, I have no legs and with absolute
      freedom choose to interpret this fact as a problem to climbing the crag. So,
      while external situations aren't directly imposing a lack of freedom, the
      various interpretations I have of the world distort each other and
      effectivel renders Sartre's idea of freedom useless.

      Does this make sense??
      I would love to hear some comments.

      Celeste
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