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Re: Intellegence...phat chance

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  • Amy
    Hi! This is the un-definition that is intellegent. Thanks a million, and all the best, Amy ... intellegents? ... position of other grief. ... there were
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 1, 2004
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      Hi!

      This is "the" un-definition that is intellegent.

      Thanks a million, and all the best,

      Amy

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Knott" <god@t...> wrote:
      > > What do you existentialists think of this definition of
      intellegents?
      >
      > Being not exactly only Existentialist, I can only speak from a
      position of other grief.
      >
      > First, judge not I one of grammatical endeavor -- especially before
      there were rules.
      >
      > Second, judge not I of ditto, as I am guilty of same -- and still
      manage to publish
      > books.
      >
      > Third, it is impossible to judge 'intelligence' from my
      perspective, lest that be
      > defined. And if defining it by a test or definition, then anything
      falling in that
      > definition and thus defined is that thing -- so anything can
      be 'smart' (e.g., Duard, by
      > his own definition).
      >
      > Fourth, I have known many book-smart people who cannot function or
      fathom the
      > 'reality' we live in...either making more or less of it than it is
      (i.e., rather than
      > nothing). Trying to measure intelligence was probably something an
      intelligent
      > person thought of to make self superior...in that, there is an
      error. However grievous
      > depends on who you are.
      >
      > Fifth, given a chance to explain an error on a test, anyone would
      have an excuse.
      > given an inability to perform, an excuse is inherent in the
      performance. Given an
      > unusual skill of a savant, a test or excuse does not explain the
      intelligence. Brilliance
      > is not normal, inherently, yet intelligence (or interest) cannot be
      measured according
      > to the norm.
      >
      > just as I wouldn't have myself measured by my success or failure as
      a professional
      > sportsman, I would not have intelligence judged by some skewed
      example of
      > perfection (e.g., Duard).
      >
      > What difference does it make? I would hope to have an intelligent
      doctor. i may not. i
      > had a call today from an old friend whom I had not talked with in
      probably 10 or
      > more years...a doctor...a doctor whose emails are so rattled with
      flurry that he has not
      > time to spell a word right -- and that not minding his dyslexia. I
      might trust my life
      > to him, as it is a less great evil than an unknown. And knowing
      some dyslexics who
      > are far smarter than most, yet who can barely read, i might not
      feel stupid in the
      > hands of his ignorance.
      >
      > nothing is accepted, when everything is excepted.
      >
      > Pewter Stool
    • Pedro Gonzales
      What definiton? :) ... __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 1, 2004
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        What definiton? :)
        --- Amy <loconito442@...> wrote:
        > HI,
        >
        > I have just some working defintions of intellence in
        > an article
        > called "Learning to Be Smart: An Exploration of the
        > Culture of
        > Intelligence in a Canadian Inuit Community" written
        > by PAMELA R.
        > STERN. I am doing a paper on Language preservation
        > in Inuit schools
        > and I want to see if at leaste one of the
        > definitions passes the
        > existential test of acceptance.
        >
        > "Implicit theories of intelligence are more fuzzy
        > [than
        > explicit/universal standerds]. They are developed
        > by asking what
        > constitutes intelligent behavior in real-world
        > situations
        > and "consist of people's stated or implemented
        > beliefs regarding
        > intelligent functioning" (Sternberg 1985:31).
        > Because different
        > groups of people inhabit different ecological niches
        > and possess
        > differing cultural values, it is reasonable to
        > assume that
        > intelligent behavior also differs from culture to
        > culture and,
        > perhaps, from setting to setting within particular
        > cultures. Rather
        > than seeing intelligence as a measurable cognitive
        > capacity,
        > proponents of implicit theories view intelligence as
        > configurations
        > of competences. Different cultures and subcultures
        > vary in the
        > emphasis placed upon various expressions of
        > intelligence. The skills
        > and behaviors that are valued and encouraged in one
        > society may be
        > quite different from those valued and encouraged in
        > another."(Stern)
        >
        > What do you existentialists think of this definition
        > of intellegents?
        >
        > All the best,
        >
        > Amy
        >
        >
        >
        >


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      • Baztuk@aol.com
        Amy I don t think that it is a complete definition, because sometimes intelligence means that your views are going to differ fom what you are expected to
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 2, 2004
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          Amy

          I don't think that it is a complete definition, because sometimes
          intelligence means that your views are going to differ fom what you are expected to
          think, although everyone on this Island may be "valued and encouraged" when
          believing that we all need to act like robots and complete our endless task of
          chores, whilst buying anything and everything that goes on sale, it doesn't
          necessarily mean that that is an intelligent thing to do.
          Intelligence is the ability to see past what your society wants you to think.

          I'm not talking big conspiracy theories either. Just to realise that so much o
          f what we are fed by the media is make believe, I avoid reading newspapers as
          much as possible,but on the odd occasion that I do, I always find it amusing
          and amazing to read a headline, and then the last paragraph of a story
          (normally tucked away 3 pages in and 12 font sizes lower), they so often completely
          contradict each other.

          Barry

          In a message dated 02/04/2004 01:24:29 GMT Standard Time,
          loconito442@... writes:

          > HI,
          >
          > I have just some working defintions of intellence in an article
          > called "Learning to Be Smart: An Exploration of the Culture of
          > Intelligence in a Canadian Inuit Community" written by PAMELA R.
          > STERN. I am doing a paper on Language preservation in Inuit schools
          > and I want to see if at leaste one of the definitions passes the
          > existential test of acceptance.
          >
          > "Implicit theories of intelligence are more fuzzy [than
          > explicit/universal standerds]. They are developed by asking what
          > constitutes intelligent behavior in real-world situations
          > and "consist of people's stated or implemented beliefs regarding
          > intelligent functioning" (Sternberg 1985:31). Because different
          > groups of people inhabit different ecological niches and possess
          > differing cultural values, it is reasonable to assume that
          > intelligent behavior also differs from culture to culture and,
          > perhaps, from setting to setting within particular cultures. Rather
          > than seeing intelligence as a measurable cognitive capacity,
          > proponents of implicit theories view intelligence as configurations
          > of competences. Different cultures and subcultures vary in the
          > emphasis placed upon various expressions of intelligence. The skills
          > and behaviors that are valued and encouraged in one society may be
          > quite different from those valued and encouraged in another."(Stern)
          >
          > What do you existentialists think of this definition of intellegents?
          >
          > All the best,
          >
          > Amy
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Our Home: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/existlist
          > (Includes community book list, chat, and more.)
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • louise
          Pedro-Profile, Is that an aorta in your hand? Herat-Throb
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 4, 2004
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            Pedro-Profile,
            Is that an aorta in your hand?
            Herat-Throb


            --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, Pedro Gonzales <milanab2002@y...>
            wrote:
            > What definiton? :)
            > --- Amy <loconito442@y...> wrote:
            > > HI,
            > >
            > > I have just some working defintions of intellence in
            > > an article
            > > called "Learning to Be Smart: An Exploration of the
            > > Culture of
            > > Intelligence in a Canadian Inuit Community" written
            > > by PAMELA R.
            > > STERN. I am doing a paper on Language preservation
            > > in Inuit schools
            > > and I want to see if at leaste one of the
            > > definitions passes the
            > > existential test of acceptance.
            > >
            > > "Implicit theories of intelligence are more fuzzy
            > > [than
            > > explicit/universal standerds]. They are developed
            > > by asking what
            > > constitutes intelligent behavior in real-world
            > > situations
            > > and "consist of people's stated or implemented
            > > beliefs regarding
            > > intelligent functioning" (Sternberg 1985:31).
            > > Because different
            > > groups of people inhabit different ecological niches
            > > and possess
            > > differing cultural values, it is reasonable to
            > > assume that
            > > intelligent behavior also differs from culture to
            > > culture and,
            > > perhaps, from setting to setting within particular
            > > cultures. Rather
            > > than seeing intelligence as a measurable cognitive
            > > capacity,
            > > proponents of implicit theories view intelligence as
            > > configurations
            > > of competences. Different cultures and subcultures
            > > vary in the
            > > emphasis placed upon various expressions of
            > > intelligence. The skills
            > > and behaviors that are valued and encouraged in one
            > > society may be
            > > quite different from those valued and encouraged in
            > > another."(Stern)
            > >
            > > What do you existentialists think of this definition
            > > of intellegents?
            > >
            > > All the best,
            > >
            > > Amy
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
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