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Re: [existlist] Nihilism and the aesthetics of evil?

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  • Mattlzpf@aol.com
    Whatever it is you are reading you may as well be reading the tabloids because they re about just as truthful. I know of many scholarly texts that will
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 8, 2003
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      Whatever it is you are reading you may as well be reading the tabloids
      because they're about just as truthful. I know of many scholarly texts that
      will explain Nietzsche's personal views and feelings on what you are having
      trouble with, these include letters he wrote to friends and family. I am
      telling you with the most seriousness, Nietzsche was in no way a fascist or a
      contributor to any type of fascist dictator (unless accidentally). His philosophy
      is usually smothered in irony and his concepts attack the conditional mode of
      thinking that society cannot escape. This is the reason why so many people
      don't understand his philosophy, aside from the fact that most people don't read
      him enough to see the techniques he uses to make his points. He's not like
      Aristotle who will give you a list of premises and conclusions.
      I really enjoy philosophizing but this ranting and debating, as if
      democratic true believers of such strong ideologies who feel the world is real
      and must be impacted by strong people, is far from any actual theoretical
      progress and becomes horrible nonsense cluttered by subjective real world (yours or
      mine?) fuss. Personally, I think you have no business doing philosophy and
      judging by your quick hitting demands and authoritative tagging your Sermon on
      the Mount has unfortunately just begun.

      --MATT_C
    • George Walton
      Matt, I have no idea who you are addressing your comments to. I can only hope, perhaps, it might be me. Nietzsche s glorification of the Roman Empire, Pilate,
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 8, 2003
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        Matt,

        I have no idea who you are addressing your comments to. I can only hope, perhaps, it might be me.

        Nietzsche's glorification of the Roman Empire, Pilate, and what Daniel W. Conway calls his "imperial aspirations" speak volumes about one aspect of his philsophy. His contempt for "the herd" another. His veneration of the aristocratic Ubermen, yet another.

        Nietzsche lived in la la land like most philsophers who imagine the ideas they think up inside their heads bear an actual resemblance to the far, far, far more complex and convoluted world around us. Unlike Heidegger, however, Nietzsche was not around when Adolph was playing Death Camp with literally millions of lives. So, we will never really know for sure what he might have had to say, right?

        Is he "responsible" for fascism? No, in my opinion, of course not. His ideas were twisted all out of shape by those looking for an "intellectual" rationalization to carry our their own mangled metaphysical myopia. The Nazis, after all, embraced Shopenhauer and Kant, as well...but few manage to attach their philosophies to the gas chambers.

        Still, Nietzsche's philosophy was largely a meglomanical rant. And though he shuddered to imagine what lesser minds than his might do with it [his own revelations regarding the 20th century being far more prescient than either Nostradamas or the Bible] what the hell did he really expect with his increasingly more frenetic fulminations about the "meek" inheriting the earth?

        Biggie


        Mattlzpf@... wrote:
        Whatever it is you are reading you may as well be reading the tabloids
        because they're about just as truthful. I know of many scholarly texts that
        will explain Nietzsche's personal views and feelings on what you are having
        trouble with, these include letters he wrote to friends and family. I am
        telling you with the most seriousness, Nietzsche was in no way a fascist or a
        contributor to any type of fascist dictator (unless accidentally). His philosophy
        is usually smothered in irony and his concepts attack the conditional mode of
        thinking that society cannot escape. This is the reason why so many people
        don't understand his philosophy, aside from the fact that most people don't read
        him enough to see the techniques he uses to make his points. He's not like
        Aristotle who will give you a list of premises and conclusions.
        I really enjoy philosophizing but this ranting and debating, as if
        democratic true believers of such strong ideologies who feel the world is real
        and must be impacted by strong people, is far from any actual theoretical
        progress and becomes horrible nonsense cluttered by subjective real world (yours or
        mine?) fuss. Personally, I think you have no business doing philosophy and
        judging by your quick hitting demands and authoritative tagging your Sermon on
        the Mount has unfortunately just begun.

        --MATT_C

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      • Mattlzpf@aol.com
        In a message dated 11/8/2003 11:15:41 AM Pacific Standard Time, ... Nietzsche wrote to his sister telling her that she is defaming his good name by marrying an
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 16, 2003
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          In a message dated 11/8/2003 11:15:41 AM Pacific Standard Time,
          iambiguously@... writes:


          > So, we will never really know for sure what he might have had to say,
          > right?
          >


          Nietzsche wrote to his sister telling her that she is defaming his
          good name by marrying an anti-semite. Then he said that he was appalled that a
          person could actually have such prejudice.

          --MATT_C


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • C. S. Wyatt
          ... good name by marrying an anti-semite. Then he said that he was appalled that a person could actually have such prejudice. ... Nietzsche did far more than
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 16, 2003
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            --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, Mattlzpf@a... wrote:
            > Nietzsche wrote to his sister telling her that she is defaming his
            good name by marrying an anti-semite. Then he said that he was
            appalled that a person could actually have such prejudice.
            >
            > --MATT_C


            Nietzsche did far more than write to his sister. For several months
            they did not speak. It was quite evident he would have nothing to do
            with his brother-in-law, nor the social/political movement he represented.

            Sadly, as I note on teh web site for this group, when Nietzsche's
            health began to decline he refused help from his sister. His sister
            begged Nietzsche to move with her and her husband to Paraguay with the
            intention of forming a commune. Nietzsche would do nothing of the
            sort. (And, in the end 'Lisabeth would ruin Nietzsche's name by
            speaking to Nazi groups.)

            It's ironic that Nietzsche's last days were spent confused and in the
            care of his sister and her nationalistic husband. I think he might
            have considered it a form of Hell to share a house with such a man.

            I hope to expand all the information on the Web site in time.
            Nietzsche might have been a tad sloppy with his early works, but he
            was a man of integrity and honor.

            - CSW
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