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Post modernist

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  • bhvwd
    Eduard, This has the felt sense of one of those perjorative nominations coined to degrade by faint praise. I would always think of modern as
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 2, 2003
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      Eduard, This has the felt sense of one of those perjorative
      nominations coined to degrade by faint praise. I would always
      think of modern as contemporary. Some obviously are so on top of
      style and culture as to be always ahead of the curve. They nominate
      the post modern and are thus more hip than that which is ahead. I
      imagine them at a cocktail party in an orange wig drinking ox blood
      from an uranium mug. I would find it adequate to be simply
      contemporary but usually settle for selfstyled. Bill
    • eduard at home
      The use of the word, however, is a problem. If you say that someone is a postmodernist , then their views are in advance of someone who might be a modernist.
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 2, 2003
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        The use of the word, however, is a problem. If you say that
        someone is a "postmodernist", then their views are in
        advance of someone who might be a modernist. Thus
        "modernist" is not today, but in the past. So one might
        also ask when did this modernist exist -- in the 90s, 70 or
        perhaps in the 50s.

        Actually, the term "postmodernist" is mostly used for
        architecture in relation to the modernist movement in the
        1930s. Post modernist would then be in the 40s and 50s.

        But that still leaves the term as used within philosophy. I
        asked the same question on another philosophy list and never
        got an answer.

        eduard

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "bhvwd" <valleywestdental@...>
        To: <existlist@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2003 1:52 PM
        Subject: [existlist] Post modernist


        > Eduard, This has the felt sense of one of those
        perjorative
        > nominations coined to degrade by faint praise. I would
        always
        > think of modern as contemporary. Some obviously are so on
        top of
        > style and culture as to be always ahead of the curve. They
        nominate
        > the post modern and are thus more hip than that which is
        ahead. I
        > imagine them at a cocktail party in an orange wig drinking
        ox blood
        > from an uranium mug. I would find it adequate to be simply
        > contemporary but usually settle for selfstyled. Bill
        >
        >
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      • Mary Jo Malo
        This brings to mind the somewhat silly named artistic movement, The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. Definitions are boring. History can be boring. Philosophy
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 2, 2003
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          This brings to mind the somewhat silly named artistic movement, The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. Definitions are boring. History can be boring. Philosophy devoid of real people is sterile. As much as we like to say we're self-styled, we aren't independent of our "existential layers". We're products of biology and history. If you aren't rebelling against some kind of idiocy in the world, you're probably an idiot.

          Mary Jo

          eduard at home <yeoman@...> wrote:
          The use of the word, however, is a problem. If you say that
          someone is a "postmodernist", then their views are in
          advance of someone who might be a modernist. Thus
          "modernist" is not today, but in the past. So one might
          also ask when did this modernist exist -- in the 90s, 70 or
          perhaps in the 50s.

          Actually, the term "postmodernist" is mostly used for
          architecture in relation to the modernist movement in the
          1930s. Post modernist would then be in the 40s and 50s.

          But that still leaves the term as used within philosophy. I
          asked the same question on another philosophy list and never
          got an answer.

          eduard

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "bhvwd" <valleywestdental@...>
          To: <existlist@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2003 1:52 PM
          Subject: [existlist] Post modernist


          > Eduard, This has the felt sense of one of those
          perjorative
          > nominations coined to degrade by faint praise. I would
          always
          > think of modern as contemporary. Some obviously are so on
          top of
          > style and culture as to be always ahead of the curve. They
          nominate
          > the post modern and are thus more hip than that which is
          ahead. I
          > imagine them at a cocktail party in an orange wig drinking
          ox blood
          > from an uranium mug. I would find it adequate to be simply
          > contemporary but usually settle for selfstyled. Bill
          >
          >
          > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups
          Sponsor ---------------------~-->
          > Buy Ink Cartridges or Refill Kits for Your HP, Epson,
          Canon or Lexmark
          > Printer at Myinks.com. Free s/h on orders $50 or more to
          the US & Canada. http://www.c1tracking.com/l.asp?cid=5511
          > http://us.click.yahoo.com/l.m7sD/LIdGAA/qnsNAA/ACsqlB/TM
          > ----------------------------------------------------------
          -----------~->
          >
          > Our Home: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/existlist
          > (Includes community book list, chat, and more.)
          >
          > TO UNSUBSCRIBE from this group, send an email to:
          > existlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >


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        • leeedgartyler@aol.com
          In a message dated 9/2/2003 1:06:20 PM Central Standard Time, yeoman@videotron.ca writes: The use of the word, however, is a problem. If you say that someone
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 2, 2003
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            In a message dated 9/2/2003 1:06:20 PM Central Standard Time,
            yeoman@... writes:
            The use of the word, however, is a problem. If you say that
            someone is a "postmodernist", then their views are in
            advance of someone who might be a modernist. Thus
            "modernist" is not today, but in the past. So one might
            also ask when did this modernist exist -- in the 90s, 70 or
            perhaps in the 50s.

            Actually, the term "postmodernist" is mostly used for
            architecture in relation to the modernist movement in the
            1930s. Post modernist would then be in the 40s and 50s.

            But that still leaves the term as used within philosophy. I
            asked the same question on another philosophy list and never
            got an answer.

            eduard
            I've heard several examples of postmodern architecture referred to as
            "modern" in common parlance simply because they are recent. In discussions like the
            one at hand, it's just used as an Orwellian shorthand for "something I don't
            like."

            In literature, postmodern refers to the reaction against the fragmented and
            isolated narrative and lyric forms employed by writers like Eliot and Wilder;
            sometimes it's almost a parody of them, like Catch-22 or Slaughterhouse Five;
            generally it's manifested in a return to more identifiably linear narrative
            forms with recognition of the audience and interpretive community in which it
            will be experienced. Alice Walker's Third Life of Grange Copeland or Don
            Dellilo's White Noise are good examples of postmodern lit.

            Jean Francoise Lyotard's monograph "The Postmodern Condition" A Report on
            Knowledge," which is usually published with his essay "What is the Postmodern"
            would probably answer your question much better than I can. Published first in
            Canada, as I recall.

            Ed Tyler

            http://hometown.aol.com/leeedgartyler/myhomepage/index.html


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • eduard at home
            Ed, That gets me no further than what we started out with. If postmodernist refers to a literary style, then it must be a style in a particular time.
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 2, 2003
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              Ed,

              That gets me no further than what we started out with. If
              postmodernist refers to a literary style, then it must be a
              style in a particular time. Otherwise, why use a word which
              is a combination of two other terms that relate to time??
              But that's Ok. It would appear to me that the word is being
              used for affect rather than to aid definition.

              eduard

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: <leeedgartyler@...>
              To: <existlist@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2003 2:41 PM
              Subject: Re: [existlist] Post modernist


              > In a message dated 9/2/2003 1:06:20 PM Central Standard
              Time,
              > yeoman@... writes:
              > The use of the word, however, is a problem. If you say
              that
              > someone is a "postmodernist", then their views are in
              > advance of someone who might be a modernist. Thus
              > "modernist" is not today, but in the past. So one might
              > also ask when did this modernist exist -- in the 90s, 70
              or
              > perhaps in the 50s.
              >
              > Actually, the term "postmodernist" is mostly used for
              > architecture in relation to the modernist movement in the
              > 1930s. Post modernist would then be in the 40s and 50s.
              >
              > But that still leaves the term as used within philosophy.
              I
              > asked the same question on another philosophy list and
              never
              > got an answer.
              >
              > eduard
              > I've heard several examples of postmodern architecture
              referred to as
              > "modern" in common parlance simply because they are
              recent. In discussions like the
              > one at hand, it's just used as an Orwellian shorthand for
              "something I don't
              > like."
              >
              > In literature, postmodern refers to the reaction against
              the fragmented and
              > isolated narrative and lyric forms employed by writers
              like Eliot and Wilder;
              > sometimes it's almost a parody of them, like Catch-22 or
              Slaughterhouse Five;
              > generally it's manifested in a return to more identifiably
              linear narrative
              > forms with recognition of the audience and interpretive
              community in which it
              > will be experienced. Alice Walker's Third Life of Grange
              Copeland or Don
              > Dellilo's White Noise are good examples of postmodern lit.
              >
              > Jean Francoise Lyotard's monograph "The Postmodern
              Condition" A Report on
              > Knowledge," which is usually published with his essay
              "What is the Postmodern"
              > would probably answer your question much better than I
              can. Published first in
              > Canada, as I recall.
              >
              > Ed Tyler
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