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Choosing Ford or BMW

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  • yeoman
    Mark et al, I keep asking the question within other email subjects. Since no one has answered the question, I am asking again within a specific email. I wish
    Message 1 of 41 , May 1 9:09 AM
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      Mark et al,

      I keep asking the question within other email subjects.
      Since no one has answered the question, I am asking again
      within a specific email.

      I wish to buy a car. The selection is down to either a
      Ford or a BMW. I have no idea of what cars cost now-a-days,
      so lets assume that I have sufficient funds to buy either.

      The statement has been made that a religious god has a
      "dramatic and far reaching impact on our everyday individual
      being and moment by moment existence and choices".

      My understanding of Existentialism is that we have freedom
      of choice. If I recall correctly Sartre has said that we
      are condemned to this freedom.

      An "impact" is only an impact if in some fashion it requires
      that I do something against my desire for action. Or that I
      am prevented in some fashion from taking a specific action.

      Thus the question -- How does a god [any god] have an impact
      upon my choice of car???

      eduard
    • Mark and Bev Tindall
      ... I can see why you are reluictant to answer my questions on why art is a valuable resource in Existentialism. ... If begins a conditional proposition.
      Message 41 of 41 , May 2 3:32 PM
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        eduard wrote:


        > I can see why you are reluctant to answer the
        > question.


        I can see why you are reluictant to answer my questions on why art is a valuable resource in Existentialism.


        > If I have absolute freedom [Read Chris' FAQs]


        'If' begins a conditional proposition. Chris is wrong if he says all have absolute freedom. No-one has absolute freedom. All are constrained by at least time and space.


        > As Sartre has said, it is of no importance to
        > Existentialism.


        Sartre was wrong in this area and is not the final word on anything. There are many living Existentialist philosophers who disagree with the dead Sartre.

        As Chris stated (though he is not the final word on Existentialism ...) :

        ************************

        No one should ever suggest that the Christian Existentialists (notably the Catholic movement is of interest to me), are not valid topics. They are frequently credited with developing concepts of ethics within existentialism, as well as combining Democratic Socialism with the humanistic aspects of existentialism set forth by the "French Left" for too long.

        **************************

        Christian Existentialism is Existentialist in nature.


        Mark

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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