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Kafka

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  • Glenn Scheper
    ... I m just starting to get interested in Sartre: my glance at a gloss of his distinction between reflection upon a memory versus reexperiencing a memory
    Message 1 of 46 , Mar 26, 2001
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      > This summer I plan to "finish" three web pages:
      > Sartre, Camus, and Kafka.

      I'm just starting to get interested in Sartre: my glance at
      a gloss of his distinction between reflection upon a memory
      versus reexperiencing a memory suggest that he might have an
      awareness like mine, that extended tantric meditiations upon
      a past moment in time seem to cast a causal shadow backwards
      in time upon that moment. Well, I need to read more... But,

      As for Kafka, he is clearly of my type, making many allusions
      in his texts to this specialized occluded domain of insights,
      like I have described in my lay web essay. Perhaps you would
      check out my novel viewpoint while preparing your Kafka page?

      My whole viewpoint is contained in one longish web essay, an
      html file placed in a zip file to avoid censorship concerns:
      http://www.hughes.net/~scheper/theword.zip
      The Word of God; The Production of Christ.

      It is my ever ongoing project. Today, it starts out like this:

      Autofe------ and autocu--------- are a dominant cultural icon, and
      sufficient to explain nearly all religio-mythic stories of divine
      distinction and transcendence: discovery, fall, naming, election,
      eating god, death, metamorphosis, repentence, translation, rebirth,
      god birth, indwelling, sacredness, god act.

      The dominant cultural icon is tabooed. However, once demonstrated,
      it is salient, like Edgar Allan Poe's purloined letter. This icon
      is so pervasive, that it cannot help but be recognized by persons
      who stumble upon it, activating this cultural booby-trap, falling
      like Alice into Lewis Carroll's wonderland.

      The domain surrounding this icon is so severely repressed from our
      consciousness awareness, that it parades before us, mocking us in
      Carl Jung's collective unconscious. Religion exceedingly glorifies
      it in the occult, but poisons the very apple lest anyone report it.

      It inspired Franz Kafka to write the Metamorphosis, for initially
      all experiencers of this condition are ostracized with a universal
      unconditional negative regard (by contrast to Carl Roger's phrase,
      unconditional positive regard (love), his necessary condition for
      a child to thrive. It is the fall, the unforgivable sin.

      Those experiencers who survive madness, not as Shakespeare shewed
      in Hamlet, but walking the tightrope across nihilism to become an
      over-man, find new authenticity in this domain, as did Nietzsche.

      I must put aside embarrassment to tell it, as said William Blake:
      The stern
      Bard ceas'd, asham'd of his own song; enrag'd he swung
      His harp aloft sounding, then dash'd its shining frame against
      A ruin'd pillar in glitt'ring fragments; silent he turn'd away.

      Yet tell it I must, for that is the manifest destiny of this lamb.

      Yours truly,
      Glenn Scheper
      scheper@...
      http://www.hughes.net/~scheper/
      Copyleft(!) Forward freely.
    • yeoman
      CJB, The Doorman episode opens up all sorts of ideas. Its alternate titles are Before the Law and Man from the Country , the latter which is in Yiddish
      Message 46 of 46 , Mar 23, 2003
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        CJB,

        The Doorman episode opens up all sorts of ideas. Its alternate titles are
        "Before the Law" and "Man from the Country", the latter which is in Yiddish
        carries the idea of "obstinate incompetence" [according to the introduction
        by Steiner]. Which seems appropriate for the way this story within a story
        unfolds. The question might also be asked as to why the Doorman himself
        has had to wait at the door.

        One of the interesting parts that I read was somewhere in the first part
        where I think it is the Uncle who objects to K's behaviour, in that by not
        protesting his innocence, he is showing that he may be guilty. Of what,
        the people around K, never seem to ask.

        eduard

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Cameron Brauer" <cbrauer@...>
        To: <existlist@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, March 23, 2003 12:40 PM
        Subject: [existlist] Re: Kafka


        > Also, I really enjoyed the little story about the man waiting at the
        > door. The man was never told that he HAD to wait at the door. His
        > choice to do so was out of blind belief, shadows on the wall of the
        > cave, perhaps. When he should have turned around, walked away and
        > lived his life, he chose to do what he thought he Had to do.
        >
        > At the end of that story, the door was Shut forever. Interesting,
        > that it needed to be shut. Was it really open the whole time?
        > Maybe the doormans supposed athority was a lot like the courts?
        > (Only valid to those that believe in it?)
        >
        > CJB
        >
        >
        > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, yeoman <yeoman@v...> wrote:
        > > CJB,
        > >
        > > Yes, I agree, the wait was worth it.
        > >
        > > I shall have to think about that ending again. As to his
        > behaviour, I got
        > > the feeling that he was spending too much time in thinking about
        > his
        > > actions. But then that may only be a reflection of manner of
        > Kafka's
        > > writing. But in a sense, I do see your point, in that he seems to
        > make
        > > conclusions about others without further considering the outcome
        > of his
        > > later actions. He falls into line a bit too quickly. Yet that may
        > be
        > > something of the times in Praque. He accepts that there is a
        > hierarchy,
        > > even though he can not see, nor communicate with the higher levels.
        > >
        > > eduard
        > >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: "Cameron Brauer" <cbrauer@e...>
        > > To: <existlist@yahoogroups.com>
        > > Sent: Sunday, March 23, 2003 12:03 PM
        > > Subject: [existlist] Re: Kafka
        > >
        > >
        > > > I just finished reading "The Trial" as well. It certainly could
        > have
        > > > been shorter, but the last few chapters were well worth the wait.
        > > > It's a very relevant book to the subject of Existentialism.
        > Joseph
        > > > K. spends his life existing in the most basic of senses,
        > subservient
        > > > to his work and the court that any more active "self" would have
        > > > brushed off. He treats women as objects, which was normal for
        > the
        > > > time, but Kafka obviously wasn't thrilled by that [or
        > > > other] "norms." He spends his life as a role played in the
        > lives of
        > > > others with little though put to the decisions he makes and the
        > > > actions he takes toward others.
        > > >
        > > > In the end, it's all summed up in a very poignant scene where his
        > > > lack of selfhood is demonstrated by his refusal to be an active
        > part
        > > > in his fate and thus he dies in a country gravel pit reaching out
        > > > for "The Other" in the window of the house overlooking the scene.
        > > >
        > > > Spiffy.
        > > > CJB
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, yeoman <yeoman@v...> wrote:
        > > > > Well, I finished reading, "The Trial".
        > > > >
        > > > > My opinion is that this would have been much better as a short
        > > > story,
        > > > > instead of a novel. Even Kafka's biographer admits that the
        > > > sequence of
        > > > > chapters is a guess.
        > > > >
        > > > > However, I am not suggesting that this takes away from Kafka's
        > > > view of
        > > > > meaningless bureaucracy. Although there is lots of this kind
        > of
        > > > thing in
        > > > > the present day, my feeling is that much of this comes from
        > > > Kafka's own
        > > > > experience with his overbearing father. I am not sure how
        > > > accurate the
        > > > > descriptions in the book truly reflect the condition in Praque
        > in
        > > > the
        > > > > 1930s.
        > > > >
        > > > > eduard
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
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