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59687Re: Existentialism is a...

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  • Mary
    Apr 18, 2013
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      eduard,

      When Sartre first introduced his atheistic existentialist ideas, Christians critics thought he was rejecting morality, when what he really was espousing was that the individual determines his own. Nietzsche said this first I believe. The example he uses in the text is a young man who must decide between staying with his mother or going off to university.

      "From the Christian side, we are reproached as people who deny the reality and seriousness of human affairs. For since we ignore the commandments of God and all values prescribed as eternal, nothing remains but what is strictly voluntary. Everyone can do what he likes, and will be incapable, from such a point of view, of condemning either the point of view or the action of anyone else." (Existentialism is a Humanism)

      Mary

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, eduardathome <yeoman@...> wrote:
      >
      > Why "unethical"??
      >
      > eduard
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Mary
      > Sent: Thursday, April 18, 2013 2:13 PM
      > To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [existlist] Re: Existentialism is a...
      >
      > Hi Doug,
      >
      > If I recall correctly, the essay was written as an ethical response to
      > charges from primarily Christians that existentialism was unethical.
      >
      > Mary
      >
      > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, Doug Viener <duditz72@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi,
      > > I just starting to wade back into the existentialist nothingness after a
      > > long absence from it :) Anyway, I picked up a copy of Sartre's
      > > Existentialism is a Humanism. Any advice anyone can offer to help with the
      > > reading?
      > >
      > > Sent from my iPhone
      > >
      > > On Apr 16, 2013, at 10:43 AM, "existlist" <hermitcrab65@> wrote:
      > >
      > > > I admit to sometimes seeking solitude out of a feeling of alienation.
      > > > Not always though. These are hilarious exaggerations but sometimes when
      > > > I go out to socialize, it does feel as if the conversations are like
      > > > this:
      > > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2sg3uPMU-w
      > > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2aeEPT2XL4U
      > > >
      > > > (like a competition to say something to get a rise out of the listener
      > > > instead of just honest sharing)
      > > >
      > > > h.
      > > >
      > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, eduardathome <yeoman@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Ultimately everyone segs into a condition of solitude. It's our way of
      > > > > life
      > > > > and not necessarily due to a feeling of alienation from others.
      > > > > Although I
      > > > > suppose you could define it in that fashion as a type of solitude. I
      > > > > doubt
      > > > > one could say that alienation is a "true" solitary. There must be more
      > > > > than
      > > > > 50 shades.
      > > > >
      > > > > eduard
      > > > >
      > > > > -----Original Message-----
      > > > > From: Mary
      > > > > Sent: Monday, April 15, 2013 1:36 PM
      > > > > To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      > > > > Subject: [existlist] Solitary/Solidarity
      > > > >
      > > > > Keeping this on existentialist footing, a true solitary is one who
      > > > > feels
      > > > > alienated from others through difference; they find so little in
      > > > > common with
      > > > > a particular group. Yet in this solitary condition one can also feel
      > > > > solidarity with others who are alienated in one degree or another.
      > > > > Camus,
      > > > > though not an existentialist, wrote about this condition. He obviously
      > > > > felt
      > > > > alienated culturally from his French friends and from their support
      > > > > for
      > > > > Stalin. On the other hand, he had many lovers, he was an artist and
      > > > > reluctant husband. We have differences but we are all human and
      > > > > sometimes
      > > > > alienated. I think needing solitude is different from feeling solitary
      > > > > due
      > > > > to what see irreconcilable differences. Alienation which leads to a
      > > > > generally solitary life is grist for existential angst, whereas
      > > > > temporary
      > > > > solitude serves as respite before again entering the fray of complex
      > > > > relationships. Paradoxically we are united through our alienation.
      > > > >
      > > > > Mary
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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