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56288Re: no sidewinder

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  • Mary
    Nov 7, 2011
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      Wil,

      I can understand your frustrations! What motivates me to wrestle with Hegel is this very concern. The "...exaggerated and theological rendering of true infinity is, I think, not in keeping with the whole point of Hegel's philosophy which seeks to go beyond any hint of personality in the Absolute." and how it hinders the speculative in both science and philosophy.

      Thanks,
      Mary

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, eupraxis@... wrote:
      >
      > Mary,
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      > That book looks interesting. I have it in my Kindle wish list. Odd that no review has been written for it there.
      >
      > I have enjoyed your posts in that other list. The hostility that you see there has been going on for a while ( a few years!). It first began in a series of very heated exchanges between Bob, and others, and myself (and much later on, Alan). I have given up on it now, for the most part. It just goes around and around, and then begins again as if nothing had been said. It gets so heated that I found myself obsessing on it to my detriment. So, I let it all go.
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      > I like Bob's book. It is well worth the read, But his more recent exaggerated and theological rendering of true infinity is, I think, not in keeping with the whole point of Hegel's philosophy which seeks to go beyond any hint of personality in the Absolute. Etc.
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      > Wil
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      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Mary <josephson45r@...>
      > To: existlist <existlist@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Sun, Nov 6, 2011 1:08 pm
      > Subject: [existlist] Re: no sidewinder
      >
      >
      >
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      >
      > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "William" <v.valleywestdental@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Mary, does this mean you join Wil, as I am sure he thinks Hegel is the last, great philosopher. Those anticedant to FN were the true flowering of German Philosophy. I am sure Hegel was the most penetrating but I liked Husserel. I think his cynacism pried open the old world ,faith based theocracys. Then FN reached inside their bodies and pulled their guts out. Would Hegel allow quantum physics as he seems to progress like Newton.The cosmological constant was more conveinent than accepting an ever expanding universe and it seems the idea deeply bothered Einstein.I find it unfortunate Eienstein did not get to use the Hubble Space telescope. I think he would find things we are missing[...]Hegel would have no way to even think about such a situation. He did not have any idea of nuclear fusion. Who changed things more,FN or Eienstein? Bill
      > >
      > Bill,
      >
      > Here's a book review addressing differences between Hegel and Nietzsche, possibly interesting whether or not one agrees with the author's and reviewer's opinions. Hopefully Wil has interest and time for further comments. If nothing else there are references to other texts about this.
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      > http://www.cosmosandhistory.org/index.php/journal/article/view/86/172
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      > Nietzsche somewhat ironically precipitated the nihilist crisis he predicted to the same degree Hegel's thought prefigured the inevitable integration of relativity and nonlocality by describing the dialectical dynamic of thought. There are startling implications for the suggestion that subject and object are one another.
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      > I'm impressed by Hegel's astounding demonstration of what Bohm called thinking about thought. I place Einstein among the greats, because when approaching the known limits of scientific thought, he found a way to think uncommonly. When thought reaches a limit, there's no way through or around except with more thought. Einstein has had far more impact, yet the problems he foresaw now require philosophy not more technology.
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      > Who can measure mind or predict its path? All thought can do is trace where it's been as it moves. No one wills or causes it. Thought thinks `itself'. I second the elegance Einstein apprehended, Nietzsche reveled in, and Hegel conceptually organized.
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      > Everything is thought. Not so obvious . . . until you think about it.
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      > Mary
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