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53328Re: What is a Mystic's Mistake? (or, How Birds Do It)

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  • louise
    Oct 3, 2010
      Tom and all,

      It is a matter of instinct, I think - that on the question of whether or not Dick at three and a half knocked out another small boy, who was bigger than himself, I have found myself believing and you do not believe. Neither of us can establish the truth, and Dick cannot provide any evidence, except his own memory, so there it is. Dick does not respect the consensual feeling of the group, regarding quantity of posts, and often flies off the handle when his mystical posts do not receive the interest or intelligent questioning he thinks they deserve, and I am rather tired of all this, but still I think Dick is a reliable witness, in the sense of telling the truth about his own life and perceptions. I differ from Dick (and from Bill) in regard to how I think about religious faith, but otherwise many of Dick's opinions are soundly based in life experience, whether or not others might agree with him about the opinions or their topicality to this list. The religious faith opinions are absurdly generalised and fanatical. Whilst I am here busy with agreements and differences, I also agree with Bill that there are just too many helpings of mystic wisdom per day, and I would ask that the communal feeling be respected. Mary, Tom, Peter and Wil have all recently offered their opinions about excessive or unreasonable posting, and the moderator has apparently given up after repeated attempts to moderate have been flouted. Please, Dick, respect the site. We are only being democratic.

      Louise

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "tom" <tsmith17_midsouth1@...> wrote:
      >
      > Louise,
      >
      > I recall a while back when Dick was saying at 3 and a half he had knocked another somewhat older child out cold. I expressed my doubt as to the truth of it, and you tended to believe him. The one statement he made a few months ago that I do believe was that he had only met a few people in his life for whom he had respect. When Dick first came here, I was on his side as a mystic being attacked by dogmatic materialists, and even joined his group for a while. I left after his group changed where only he could post. Dick speaks of how he has been ridiculed etc. as if he is a victim, omitting the insults and condecension he has expressed towards others. He would have us believe that he is beseiged by famous scientists etc. for his wisdom.
      >
      > I put him on my block list about a month ago, and no longer have my inbox littered with his postings. Some of his things are interesting, but if being like Dick is the result of mystic experiences, that is not a strong selling point for them.
      >
      > Peace,
      > Tom
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: fictiveparrot
      > To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Sunday, October 03, 2010 1:42 AM
      > Subject: [existlist] Re: What is a Mystic's Mistake? (or, How Birds Do It)
      >
      >
      >
      > There is nothing so annoying as someone who thinks they know something. I have trimmed a bubbling diatribe in my editorial fashion to the following few absurdities, which suggest a knowing, a mysticism beyond knowing, or a mysteriously mystic mystique mistake.
      >
      > > Man is the most wondrous of them all
      >
      > > they are coming.
      >
      > > We are constructed of THREE parts, three layers, three dimensions.
      >
      > > We ALL come from the CENTRE, outwards. (Paradise is
      > > INWARDS).
      >
      > > Those who would tell you that
      > > heaven is within you are fools
      >
      > > A baby cannot run across the
      > > road and dodge the traffic. But
      > > they can by the time they are three or
      > > four. And by that time they can also
      > > THINK and ask questions.
      >
      > > No money, donations or thanks needed. Just tell me to
      > > piss off, for I am used to it and I am a warrior because of it.
      >
      > > Merlin
      >
      > Money or donations. Ha.
      > Hahaha haha.
      >
      > There are so many inconsistencies and circularities of contradiction in the "thought" of these words so as to make it a humor worth paying for... if that is the humor of the type you enjoy. I find my interest in comedians changes. I used to love Emo Phillips... but I don't find him funny anymore. I think juxtaposition is funny, and in studying myself, it always seems humor comes from an essence of the unexpected. At some point, Phillips became predictable. The mannerism and the same old stories were not funny anymore. I do not pay the price of listening as I can find so much more humor here. It may not last, and likely it will get old.
      >
      > We recently adopted 2 cats, as reward for having withstood the departure of two others whose physical entity lies below the dirt in our yard, illegally. The new beasts bring new wonders, sometimes to the side door -- sometimes alive, and sometimes not. But one interesting comparison I was derived to make was a comparison between man's 'brilliance', and that of a cat's. I had a daughter who walked at 6 months, and another who with stubborn insistence on a different means of locomotion (technically known as 'skootching'), did not walk till she was 2 (years). The former is something of an athlete (with a disinterest in athleticism) and the latter not an athlete (with an interest in athleticism). Whether interested or not, or capable or not, neither were walking or running or even killing and eating on their own at 4 months, let alone climbing to the top of the swingset and strolling there well above the ground while waving mercilessly at passing flies and the modicum of potential meals dangling in the branches above their heads. The physical feat of roughhousing play and acrobatics the two young felines can muster leaves one in awe of the fact that at the same age the human is advanced of the curve in raising and holding aloft their own unbearably fat heads. It may make one wonder just how wondrous that wondrous being is, or how such self-perceived importance in a tiny achievement of lifting a terribly fat head leads to the idea of superiority and mysticism.
      >
      > "Merlin" Dickdick, who has called me out in the past over the indifference to my own name, has adopted another himself, perhaps the right of the 'mystic' which apparently he has presumed to become (and don't deny it, Dickyboy, you think you are smarter than the lot of us no matter what version of hyperbole you choose to dismantle your own thoughts with). Yet the amateurish rantings (that is, unconvincing) are so much like the 'great' voices that have passed through this virtual hall -- namely leDuard and Trinnydad to name but two -- who ranted and raved and rotated and ruined their own ravenous rage in regular riffs of rot. The blathering and meandering and claims of knowing seeping under the door to the playroom like smoke of meaning the alarm has yet to detect, and somehow never gets detected.
      >
      > Paradise is within, but heaven is not. We are made of three wonderous parts, all of which are unable to meet the physical prowess of a cat.
      >
      > How is it that we see a miracle and mystique when we finally lift our fat heads from the carpet to look around at the cats running physical circles around us, and we claim by that wee gesture some type of superiority and then mysticism? It is my charge that some blithering blatherers (this one included) would perhaps assume incorrectly that their divine self-indulgence and self-centered self-induced self-deluded self-ridiculing selfisms are myopic misanthropes of the morphically mythical type... ahem, that the delusions of grandour affected by their own mouth affect their ability to perceive their own error.
      >
      > I habitually balance on the edge of my perch to look over the edge of the nest and peer down at the waiting jaws of the cat into whose belly I will likely stumble. I know it is dangerous to abandon the safety and solitude of the nest, and yet I consider it for whatever unknown advantage I may imagine lies beyond. And when I do take that step, which I may do with some conviction or not, or on the other hand may stumble, trip or be pushed, it is then I may either find I have talent or not for flying and save myself from the jaws as they approach me and I them. Either I will learn from the fall that it wasn't a good idea to depart at that moment, or that I can fly. Most likely it is one chance, and I best make the most of it, or die trying.
      >
      > I submit to you my original interpretation of a mystic:
      >
      > http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/160003/sn/171633442/name/schlitzie_whats-the-point.jpg
      >
      > Why is it that a mystic is not so smart as a falling bird?
      >
      > Tayking D. Hint
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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