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33589Re: Power death

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  • Siobhan
    Apr 1, 2005
      Definitely. EE (existential ethics, that oxymoron) ARE, in the words
      of the exist-founders, the individual and his working out of the
      authenticity-bad faith and freedom-responsibility conundrums in an
      everchanging environment of facts and feelings. Our very modern
      struggle is against those who wish to wrest from us that choice which
      is the "ethic" itself. So whether the religious or any type of
      government (any broken branch can pull down the individual tree), we
      still have to decide for ourselves. In our country we are endanger of
      all branches twisting into some sort of hellish nightmare that only
      the strong will survive...Siobhan

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "bhvwd" <v.valleywestdental@m...>
      wrote:
      >
      > The schivo debacle was not an ethical argument nor a medical
      > argument. It was a struggle over power and jurisdiction. It was a
      > contest between the American jurisprudance system and cannon law
      of
      > the roman church. Side players bellied up for a chance at the
      scraps
      > but the main course was held and digested by the American judicary.
      > Rome is rebuffed, the protestant right is set into its place and as
      > the people of the world see the situation with greater calm they
      > will understand that the power to die is still personal.
      > As existentialists our endless battle against bullying
      collectives
      > is given a boost. Rome is a mad dictatorship who wishes to rule us
      > all. It is a bit better organised than the protestant right and as
      > we play them off against each other our advantage is gained by
      their
      > destruction. At the moment this is an idea contest between the
      > pragmatists and the mystacists. I think I see who has the
      > advantage here if we can keep it to words. Again in this light
      the
      > judicary has upheld its duty to uphold law and order. I am not bold
      > enough to suggest federal marshals should be sent to churches to
      > enforce common law. I think that result will be slowly undertaken
      by
      > public opinion and legislative caveat.
      > Then again the mass of christanity finds itself facing the loss
      of
      > two arch conservative magnates. Falwell and the pope are on the
      > ropes and even though the organisations will garnish attention at
      > their passing chances are younger and less rigid sorts may come
      to
      > the fore. Eithr way we will be waiting, ready to defend our
      personal
      > liberties and ideas against the power blocks that will reform .It
      is
      > what we do while we wait to die. Bill
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