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Re: [ExGDBd] Re: Responding to those who struggle

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  • J J
    Temptation is not a sin. God does not promise to remove temptation. Temptation is not a moral flaw and has nothing whatsoever to do with attaining perfection.
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 23, 2011
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      Temptation is not a sin. God does not promise to remove temptation. Temptation
      is not a moral flaw and has nothing whatsoever to do with attaining perfection.

      Perfection is NOT the absence of temptation. Perfection is resistance to
      temptation when it occurs. We CAN achieve perfection. If you can resist
      temptation once, you can do it again, with the help of the Holy Ghost.
      Whenever you successfully resist a temptation, or successfully do what God's
      Word says to do, you have achieved a moment of perfection. God never promises to
      take away our temptations. He DOES promise to walk with us in the midst of them.


      ~ J





      ________________________________
      From: Tony <tonyb0505@...>
      To: exgaydiscussionboard@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wed, March 23, 2011 9:18:07 AM
      Subject: [ExGDBd] Re: Responding to those who struggle

       
      Hi Thom,

      You wrote:
      "It still surprises me how many Christians seem to think that some life issues
      are beyond the grasp of Christ, that sexual issues somehow are beyond the reach
      of divine intervention, that healing is too hard and that we have to accept
      sexual brokenness in the lives of people we love."

      Leane Payne wrote:
      "As a sexual neurosis, lesbian behavior (except when manifested in a hysterical
      personality) is not nearly so complicated as male homosexual behavior."

      Hmmmm.

      So take a person with SSA who happens to be a hysterical and track their journey
      as he or she tries to find healing through Christ.

      I am not saying what you write is incorrect, but it sure deserves qualification.
      How many years? Why does it take so long? If perfection of character is
      impossible, where do you draw the line and what is your basis for where you draw
      it? (This level of sanctification is possible, that level is impossible, and
      here is why.)

      My take on it is that the trauma part of the equation muddies the waters for by
      definition, trauma lies below the conscious realm. Does reading the Bible with
      faith allow the word that is read to reach some of the deep places?

      I can tell you that I am a Christian and I can tell you that from the accounts
      of various counselors, my life is riddled with trauma that still appears
      inaccessible. One counselor, when she asked how many gay lovers I have had after
      I answered "None," repeated the question 4 more times. Why? She was convinced I
      was being dishonest and told me with my profile, it is astonishing I did not
      immerse myself in the gay lifestyle. Another practitioner told me my level of
      oppression is typical of people who were once actively involved in satanic cult
      activity.

      As said, I am not saying I disagree with you. But the words FEEL too easily
      stated. They do not FEEL reality-based.

      Who knows? Maybe they simply cast the more traumatized into hell's trash bin.

      Part of me feels I can fit a fleet of Mack trucks in between the chasm that
      represents a whopper of a degree of cognitive dissonance.

      After all, something doesn't fit.

      Or maybe I'm just left out.

      Tony
      --- In exgaydiscussionboard@yahoogroups.com, "Thom Hunter" <th2950@...> wrote:
      >
      > Good Guys,
      > It still surprises me how many Christians seem to think that some life
      > issues are beyond the grasp of Christ, that sexual issues somehow are
      > beyond the reach of divine intervention, that healing is too hard and
      > that we have to accept sexual brokenness in the lives of people we love.
      > People are in pain and we say "so sad, too bad." We equip ourselves to
      > respond to other needs. Why not this one?
      > We know that there is no temptation for which God does not provide a way
      > of escape. We know that His grace is sufficient. We know that Christ is
      > always with us.Yet . . . many Christians still wring their hands when
      > confronted with the reality that some of the people in their churches
      > and in their families struggle with homosexuality, pornography and
      > sexual addiction. Why don't we do more to help? Mostly because we don't
      > know what to do, what to say, what to pray.
      > I hope you'll check out a couple of books that I believe will be helpful
      > to you, not only with your own sexual struggles, but in knowing how to
      > be more responsive to those you love. Sharing the Christian perspective
      > on these issues becomes more and more important as culture proceeds with
      > efforts to normalize sexual brokenness.
      > Here are the links to a book recently released by Debbie Thurman and to
      > my book as well:
      > Post-Gay? Post-Christian?: Anatomy of a Cultural and Faith Identity
      > Crisis
      > <http://www.amazon.com/Post-Gay-Post-Christian-Anatomy-Cultural-Identity\
      > /dp/0967628962/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1300810467&sr=1-1> , by
      > Debbie Thurman. ($11.69)
      > Surviving Sexual Brokenness: What Grace Can Do
      > <http://www.amazon.com/Surviving-Sexual-Brokenness-What-Grace/dp/1449707\
      > 319/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1300806524&sr=8-1> , by Thom Hunter.
      > ($11.86)
      > I hope you will consider adding these books to your personal library or
      > purchasing them for people you know who need them. By helping books on
      > this subject succeed, we open the door for the possibility of more
      > resources being more available to more people.
      > God Bless,
      > Thom Hunterwww.thomhunter.com <http://thomhunter.com/>
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Paul Silen
      Hi Tony, It sounds to me like the Christian counseling that you worked with is towing the party line. I hear that your counselor has prepetuated the myth that
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 23, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Tony,
        It sounds to me like the Christian counseling that you worked with is towing the
        party line. I hear that your counselor has prepetuated the myth that if you're
        dealing with SSA you must have done something pretty bad to warrent God to give
        you over to something like that. And involvement in the ocult? Please! Its the
        same old story. Idealist thinking and magical thinking.




        ________________________________
        From: Tony <tonyb0505@...>
        To: exgaydiscussionboard@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, March 23, 2011 8:18:07 AM
        Subject: [ExGDBd] Re: Responding to those who struggle

         
        Hi Thom,

        You wrote:
        "It still surprises me how many Christians seem to think that some life issues
        are beyond the grasp of Christ, that sexual issues somehow are beyond the reach
        of divine intervention, that healing is too hard and that we have to accept
        sexual brokenness in the lives of people we love."

        Leane Payne wrote:
        "As a sexual neurosis, lesbian behavior (except when manifested in a hysterical
        personality) is not nearly so complicated as male homosexual behavior."

        Hmmmm.

        So take a person with SSA who happens to be a hysterical and track their journey
        as he or she tries to find healing through Christ.

        I am not saying what you write is incorrect, but it sure deserves qualification.
        How many years? Why does it take so long? If perfection of character is
        impossible, where do you draw the line and what is your basis for where you draw
        it? (This level of sanctification is possible, that level is impossible, and
        here is why.)

        My take on it is that the trauma part of the equation muddies the waters for by
        definition, trauma lies below the conscious realm. Does reading the Bible with
        faith allow the word that is read to reach some of the deep places?

        I can tell you that I am a Christian and I can tell you that from the accounts
        of various counselors, my life is riddled with trauma that still appears
        inaccessible. One counselor, when she asked how many gay lovers I have had after
        I answered "None," repeated the question 4 more times. Why? She was convinced I
        was being dishonest and told me with my profile, it is astonishing I did not
        immerse myself in the gay lifestyle. Another practitioner told me my level of
        oppression is typical of people who were once actively involved in satanic cult
        activity.

        As said, I am not saying I disagree with you. But the words FEEL too easily
        stated. They do not FEEL reality-based.

        Who knows? Maybe they simply cast the more traumatized into hell's trash bin.

        Part of me feels I can fit a fleet of Mack trucks in between the chasm that
        represents a whopper of a degree of cognitive dissonance.

        After all, something doesn't fit.

        Or maybe I'm just left out.

        Tony
        --- In exgaydiscussionboard@yahoogroups.com, "Thom Hunter" <th2950@...> wrote:
        >
        > Good Guys,
        > It still surprises me how many Christians seem to think that some life
        > issues are beyond the grasp of Christ, that sexual issues somehow are
        > beyond the reach of divine intervention, that healing is too hard and
        > that we have to accept sexual brokenness in the lives of people we love.
        > People are in pain and we say "so sad, too bad." We equip ourselves to
        > respond to other needs. Why not this one?
        > We know that there is no temptation for which God does not provide a way
        > of escape. We know that His grace is sufficient. We know that Christ is
        > always with us.Yet . . . many Christians still wring their hands when
        > confronted with the reality that some of the people in their churches
        > and in their families struggle with homosexuality, pornography and
        > sexual addiction. Why don't we do more to help? Mostly because we don't
        > know what to do, what to say, what to pray.
        > I hope you'll check out a couple of books that I believe will be helpful
        > to you, not only with your own sexual struggles, but in knowing how to
        > be more responsive to those you love. Sharing the Christian perspective
        > on these issues becomes more and more important as culture proceeds with
        > efforts to normalize sexual brokenness.
        > Here are the links to a book recently released by Debbie Thurman and to
        > my book as well:
        > Post-Gay? Post-Christian?: Anatomy of a Cultural and Faith Identity
        > Crisis
        > <http://www.amazon.com/Post-Gay-Post-Christian-Anatomy-Cultural-Identity
        ><http://thomhunter.com/>
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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