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Sexual abuse of Black boys - The Shocking Story

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  • Laura
    Sexual abuse of Black boys - The Shocking Story by Nikitta A. Foston IN Woodbridge, New Jersey, a 3-year-old boy was sexually assaulted and beat to death by a
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 22 2:19 PM
      Sexual abuse of Black boys - The Shocking Story

      by Nikitta A. Foston

      IN Woodbridge, New Jersey, a 3-year-old boy was sexually assaulted
      and beat to death by a 10-year-old boy. In Harlem, a schoolteacher
      sodomized a 15-year-old former student and sent sexually graphic
      messages to him over the Internet. In Houston, a 12-year-old boy was
      abused and assaulted by his cousin.

      In Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Atlanta, in cities across the
      United States, young Black boys are being abused and assaulted in
      foster homes, government-run prisons and detention centers in a
      shocking national problem that nobody talks about.

      The statistics are explosive. One out of six boys is abused before
      age 16, and the rates are dramatically higher in Black areas marred
      by systemic poverty, broken homes, high unemployment rates and
      sociological problems.

      Scared, alone, and sometimes imprisoned by shame, these young boys
      often suffer in silence, choosing to avoid public awareness of their
      victimization. "There are elements of shame and powerlessness
      associated with male children who are victims of sexual abuse," says
      Judith Adams, principal to over 600 incarcerated students at
      Jefferson Alternative School, a juvenile detention center in
      Chicago. "Because African-American boys are in an environment that
      applauds 'macho-ism,' they feel powerless when they are violated and
      they feel as though they have failed themselves by allowing
      something like this to happen. So many young men who haven't been
      exposed to anything other than abuse think it is simply a part of
      life."

      A major reason for the increasing rates of sexual abuse in Black
      America is that young Black boys are indiscriminately arrested at an
      early age and sent to local or state facilities where they are
      routinely raped or assaulted. "Sexual assault, violence and abuse
      occur so often in group home settings and foster homes, and
      rehabilitative centers, simply because you don't have the quality of
      care or the necessary supervision. When you don't have a controlled
      environment, you don't have control," says Adams, whose detention
      center in Chicago offers single-celled, visible rooms in an attempt
      to limit such occurrences.

      Yet, even in the supposed confines of a family environment, where a
      child should be protected, boys are still at risk. Poverty, racism
      and broken families exacerbate the problem. "We have young mothers
      who are under 30 years old who are trying to raise teenage
      children," says Adams. "We see our kids coming from mixed families
      and transitory families where the mother or father has numerous
      partners in and out of the house over short periods of time."

      Part of the difficulty in dealing with child sexual abuse cases,
      experts say, is identifying the victim-perpetrator relationship. "In
      many cases, the abuse isn't thrust upon the boy all at once. It's
      often a slow process, or a courtship, where the perpetrator
      befriends the boy, gains his trust and creates avenues of access to
      him," says Dr. Nathan Hare of San Francisco.

      In fact, a recent study found that over 78 percent of child victims
      knew their attackers. "A predator is less likely to be the natural
      father, but rather, a stepfather, an uncle, cousin or family friend
      who has access and interest in the child," says Dr. Hare. "It tends
      to be someone close by, someone they respect, and someone with the
      need and audacity to approach them."

      Despite the alarming rate of sexual abuse against young Black boys,
      most male perpetrators are not homosexual. According to a study by
      the American Medical Association, 98 percent of males who raped boys
      reported that they were heterosexual. Additional research suggests
      that while male child molesters may have gender and/or age
      preferences, of those who seek out boys, the vast majority are not
      homosexual. They are pedophiles.

      Recent allegations against some celebrities for sexual assault
      indicate that power and pedophilia are the catalysts behind many
      headline stories and that many abusers are reliving images of their
      own abuse. In fact, a study conducted by the Journal of Traumatic
      Stress found that up to 80 percent perpetrators were themselves
      abused.

      In an effort to deal with the escalating problems of young Black men
      and sexual abuse, experts say encouraging parental involvement is
      integral to addressing the issue. "Unfortunately, some parents would
      rather keep quiet once they learn about the abuse of their child.
      They may choose to ignore it because the perpetrator is a respected
      individual such as a father, stepfather or a priest," says Adams.

      Failing to deal with the problem may be more damaging than the
      problem itself, says Dr. Bell. Nor is a parent's anger or revenge an
      effective strategy. "I tell parents, 'Your child needs you, they
      don't need you in prison.' They need you to be supportive and to
      help them through this. Quite often, when a child is traumatized, it
      is the parents' reaction that shapes the child's response, and
      ultimately, their healing."

      Parents, so often traumatized themselves by the abuse, often worry
      that their son will become homosexual or suffer from physical or
      emotional problems in adulthood as a result of the sexual assault.
      But, there is no compelling evidence, according to the Journal of
      the American Medical Association, that sexual abuse fundamentally
      changes a boy's sexual orientation. In fact, the study found that
      over 80 percent of sexually abused boys never become adult
      perpetrators. But the abuse may lead to confusion about sexual
      identity and is likely to affect how the boy relates in intimate
      situations. "When children are abused early on in life, it alters
      their ability to make a decision as to who they want to be," says
      Adams.

      Even abuse at the hands of a woman, experts say, can have a negative
      impact on a young Black man's sexuality in adulthood. "Although a
      boy's early experimentation with a woman has often been referred to
      as a 'rite of passage,' it can complicate his psychological
      perception of impotence if he is unable to perform," says Dr.
      Hare. "This belief in his failure may follow him into his adult
      relationships."

      The inability to form healthy adult relationships can have a lasting
      effect when abuse occurs early during a boy's formative
      years. "Abused children tend to form very extreme relationships,"
      says Adams. "They are either extremely dependent relationships or
      extremely abusive relationships. They are accustomed to being
      mistreated, and they practice what they have experienced."

      Dr. Bell agrees. "If you've been victimized by someone you trust,
      then you tend to not trust other people. At the same time, being
      victimized may bring you closer to people because of the need to
      find support and the need to find meaning and understanding."

      In a child's search for understanding, both males and females may
      show outward signs of abuse. "Usually, kids who've been abused don't
      want you to get too close to them. They don't want you to touch
      them. Even something as small as touching their hand, they will
      reject. They will snatch their hand away from you," says Adams,
      principal at a Chicago juvenile detention center. "Then, there are
      kids who will lie all over you in a manner that is completely
      inappropriate and you begin to realize that the child has been
      introduced to a sexual experience."

      Research suggests that young boys in particular may be extremely
      uncomfortable around other men and may suffer from confusion and
      anxiety about their own masculinity. The boy may be extremely
      resistant to being touched by men and may avoid situations where he
      will be seen unclothed or disrobing. Because of his uneasiness with
      males, a boy may have few male friends and may suffer in isolation,
      or gravitate toward people who are anti-masculine. Experts say that
      some boys may exhibit feminine characteristics in an attempt to
      avoid identifying with their male abuser.

      Despite these very difficult side effects, Dr. Bell and other
      experts say that victims can go on to lead normal and productive
      adult lives. "Many men go on to become doctors, lawyers, teachers,
      policemen, and many other professions. They do so by turning their
      traumatic helplessness into learned helpfulness. It's a conscious
      choice that must be made in order to move toward healing. If you are
      a victim, you have to tell someone you can trust, be willing to
      fight for yourself and be willing to prosecute."

      The process of empowering children and parents to tackle this crisis
      starts with understanding the severity of the issue and its far-
      reaching impact on both girls and boys. There is also a need for
      community-wide education for families, communities, churches,
      schools and social programs on awareness and prevention. Becoming
      familiar with some signs of abuse--guilt, anxiety, isolation, fear,
      anger, suicide attempts, depression, shame, eating disorders, sleep
      disorders, low self-esteem, alcoholism, drug addiction and sexual
      obsession or compulsion--also helps adults identify possible
      indicators of abuse.

      Parents can make a major contribution to their children's safety by
      teaching them to have authority over their body and to beware of
      certain situations, not certain people. Empower your child with the
      knowledge that he has the right to say "no" if something feels or
      sounds wrong and that he has the right to tell someone if he needs
      help.

      Role-play with your child to instruct him on how to handle certain
      situations, teach him emergency numbers, and encourage him to travel
      with a group. Above all, make sure that your child is aware of his
      worth to you, to your family and to society. Letting a child know
      that he is loved, respected and wanted is the first step toward self-
      empowerment and prevention.

      http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1077/is_8_58/ai_102025514
    • nfttm
      Laura, Having been involved in the foster care system, I know this to be disturbingly true. So many times the offenders are protected to prevent negative
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 27 11:58 AM
        Laura,

        Having been involved in the foster care system, I know
        this to be disturbingly true. So many times the
        offenders are protected to prevent negative exposure
        to the facility. Thank you for raising the awareness
        of this and hopefully, the more that people know, the
        more they will become involved in preventing or
        exposing it.

        --- Laura <exgaydates@...> wrote:

        > Sexual abuse of Black boys - The Shocking Story
        >
        > by Nikitta A. Foston
        >
        > IN Woodbridge, New Jersey, a 3-year-old boy was
        > sexually assaulted
        > and beat to death by a 10-year-old boy. In Harlem, a
        > schoolteacher
        > sodomized a 15-year-old former student and sent
        > sexually graphic
        > messages to him over the Internet. In Houston, a
        > 12-year-old boy was
        > abused and assaulted by his cousin.
        >
        > In Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Atlanta, in cities
        > across the
        > United States, young Black boys are being abused and
        > assaulted in
        > foster homes, government-run prisons and detention
        > centers in a
        > shocking national problem that nobody talks about.
        >
        > The statistics are explosive. One out of six boys is
        > abused before
        > age 16, and the rates are dramatically higher in
        > Black areas marred
        > by systemic poverty, broken homes, high unemployment
        > rates and
        > sociological problems.
        >
        > Scared, alone, and sometimes imprisoned by shame,
        > these young boys
        > often suffer in silence, choosing to avoid public
        > awareness of their
        > victimization. "There are elements of shame and
        > powerlessness
        > associated with male children who are victims of
        > sexual abuse," says
        > Judith Adams, principal to over 600 incarcerated
        > students at
        > Jefferson Alternative School, a juvenile detention
        > center in
        > Chicago. "Because African-American boys are in an
        > environment that
        > applauds 'macho-ism,' they feel powerless when they
        > are violated and
        > they feel as though they have failed themselves by
        > allowing
        > something like this to happen. So many young men who
        > haven't been
        > exposed to anything other than abuse think it is
        > simply a part of
        > life."
        >
        > A major reason for the increasing rates of sexual
        > abuse in Black
        > America is that young Black boys are
        > indiscriminately arrested at an
        > early age and sent to local or state facilities
        > where they are
        > routinely raped or assaulted. "Sexual assault,
        > violence and abuse
        > occur so often in group home settings and foster
        > homes, and
        > rehabilitative centers, simply because you don't
        > have the quality of
        > care or the necessary supervision. When you don't
        > have a controlled
        > environment, you don't have control," says Adams,
        > whose detention
        > center in Chicago offers single-celled, visible
        > rooms in an attempt
        > to limit such occurrences.
        >
        > Yet, even in the supposed confines of a family
        > environment, where a
        > child should be protected, boys are still at risk.
        > Poverty, racism
        > and broken families exacerbate the problem. "We have
        > young mothers
        > who are under 30 years old who are trying to raise
        > teenage
        > children," says Adams. "We see our kids coming from
        > mixed families
        > and transitory families where the mother or father
        > has numerous
        > partners in and out of the house over short periods
        > of time."
        >
        > Part of the difficulty in dealing with child sexual
        > abuse cases,
        > experts say, is identifying the victim-perpetrator
        > relationship. "In
        > many cases, the abuse isn't thrust upon the boy all
        > at once. It's
        > often a slow process, or a courtship, where the
        > perpetrator
        > befriends the boy, gains his trust and creates
        > avenues of access to
        > him," says Dr. Nathan Hare of San Francisco.
        >
        > In fact, a recent study found that over 78 percent
        > of child victims
        > knew their attackers. "A predator is less likely to
        > be the natural
        > father, but rather, a stepfather, an uncle, cousin
        > or family friend
        > who has access and interest in the child," says Dr.
        > Hare. "It tends
        > to be someone close by, someone they respect, and
        > someone with the
        > need and audacity to approach them."
        >
        > Despite the alarming rate of sexual abuse against
        > young Black boys,
        > most male perpetrators are not homosexual. According
        > to a study by
        > the American Medical Association, 98 percent of
        > males who raped boys
        > reported that they were heterosexual. Additional
        > research suggests
        > that while male child molesters may have gender
        > and/or age
        > preferences, of those who seek out boys, the vast
        > majority are not
        > homosexual. They are pedophiles.
        >
        > Recent allegations against some celebrities for
        > sexual assault
        > indicate that power and pedophilia are the catalysts
        > behind many
        > headline stories and that many abusers are reliving
        > images of their
        > own abuse. In fact, a study conducted by the Journal
        > of Traumatic
        > Stress found that up to 80 percent perpetrators were
        > themselves
        > abused.
        >
        > In an effort to deal with the escalating problems of
        > young Black men
        > and sexual abuse, experts say encouraging parental
        > involvement is
        > integral to addressing the issue. "Unfortunately,
        > some parents would
        > rather keep quiet once they learn about the abuse of
        > their child.
        > They may choose to ignore it because the perpetrator
        > is a respected
        > individual such as a father, stepfather or a
        > priest," says Adams.
        >
        > Failing to deal with the problem may be more
        > damaging than the
        > problem itself, says Dr. Bell. Nor is a parent's
        > anger or revenge an
        > effective strategy. "I tell parents, 'Your child
        > needs you, they
        > don't need you in prison.' They need you to be
        > supportive and to
        > help them through this. Quite often, when a child is
        > traumatized, it
        > is the parents' reaction that shapes the child's
        > response, and
        > ultimately, their healing."
        >
        > Parents, so often traumatized themselves by the
        > abuse, often worry
        > that their son will become homosexual or suffer from
        > physical or
        > emotional problems in adulthood as a result of the
        > sexual assault.
        > But, there is no compelling evidence, according to
        > the Journal of
        > the American Medical Association, that sexual abuse
        > fundamentally
        > changes a boy's sexual orientation. In fact, the
        > study found that
        > over 80 percent of sexually abused boys never become
        > adult
        > perpetrators. But the abuse may lead to confusion
        > about sexual
        > identity and is likely to affect how the boy relates
        > in intimate
        > situations. "When children are abused early on in
        > life, it alters
        > their ability to make a decision as to who they want
        > to be," says
        > Adams.
        >
        > Even abuse at the hands of a woman, experts say, can
        > have a negative
        > impact on a young Black man's sexuality in
        > adulthood. "Although a
        > boy's early experimentation with a woman has often
        > been referred to
        > as a 'rite of passage,' it can complicate his
        > psychological
        > perception of impotence if he is unable to perform,"
        > says Dr.
        > Hare. "This belief in his failure may follow him
        > into his adult
        > relationships."
        >
        > The inability to form healthy adult relationships
        > can have a lasting
        > effect when abuse occurs early during a boy's
        > formative
        > years. "Abused children tend to form very extreme
        > relationships,"
        > says Adams. "They are either extremely dependent
        > relationships or
        > extremely abusive relationships. They are accustomed
        > to being
        > mistreated, and they practice what they have
        > experienced."
        >
        > Dr. Bell agrees. "If you've been victimized by
        > someone you trust,
        > then you tend to not trust other people. At the same
        > time, being
        > victimized may bring you closer to people because of
        > the need to
        > find support and the need to find meaning and
        > understanding."
        >
        > In a child's search for understanding, both males
        > and females may
        > show outward signs of abuse. "Usually, kids who've
        > been abused don't
        > want you to get too close to them. They don't want
        > you to touch
        > them. Even something as small as touching their
        > hand, they will
        > reject. They will snatch their hand away from you,"
        > says Adams,
        > principal at a Chicago juvenile detention center.
        > "Then, there are
        > kids who will lie all over you in a manner that is
        > completely
        > inappropriate and you begin to realize that the
        > child has been
        > introduced to a sexual experience."
        >
        > Research suggests that young boys in particular may
        > be extremely
        > uncomfortable around other men and may suffer from
        > confusion and
        > anxiety about their own masculinity. The boy may be
        > extremely
        > resistant to being touched by men and may avoid
        > situations where he
        > will be seen unclothed or disrobing. Because of his
        > uneasiness with
        > males, a boy may have few male friends and may
        > suffer in isolation,
        > or gravitate toward people who are anti-masculine.
        > Experts say that
        > some boys may exhibit feminine characteristics in an
        > attempt to
        > avoid identifying with their male abuser.
        >
        > Despite these very difficult side effects, Dr. Bell
        > and other
        > experts say that victims can go on to lead normal
        > and productive
        > adult lives. "Many men go on to become doctors,
        > lawyers, teachers,
        > policemen, and many other professions. They do so by
        > turning their
        > traumatic helplessness into learned helpfulness.
        > It's a conscious
        > choice that must be made in order to move toward
        > healing. If you are
        > a victim, you have to tell someone you can trust, be
        > willing to
        > fight for yourself and be willing to prosecute."
        >
        > The process of empowering children and parents to
        > tackle this crisis
        > starts with understanding the severity of the issue
        > and its far-
        > reaching impact on both girls and boys. There is
        > also a need for
        > community-wide education for families, communities,
        > churches,
        > schools and social programs on awareness and
        > prevention. Becoming
        > familiar with some signs of abuse--guilt, anxiety,
        > isolation, fear,
        > anger, suicide attempts, depression, shame, eating
        > disorders, sleep
        > disorders, low self-esteem, alcoholism, drug
        > addiction and sexual
        > obsession or compulsion--also helps adults identify
        > possible
        > indicators of abuse.
        >
        > Parents can make a major contribution to their
        > children's safety by
        > teaching them to have authority over their body and
        > to beware of
        > certain situations, not certain people. Empower your
        > child with the
        > knowledge that he has the right to say "no" if
        > something feels or
        > sounds wrong and that he has the right to tell
        > someone if he needs
        > help.
        >
        > Role-play with your child to instruct him on how to
        > handle certain
        > situations, teach him emergency numbers, and
        > encourage him to travel
        > with a group. Above all, make sure that your child
        > is aware of his
        > worth to you, to your family and to society. Letting
        > a child know
        > that he is loved, respected and wanted is the first
        > step toward self-
        > empowerment and prevention.
        >
        >
        http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1077/is_8_58/ai_102025514
        >
        >


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      • Thomas Morey
        Great article, but sadly so true! However, this one statement, According to a study by the American Medical Association, 98 percent of males who raped boys
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 30 3:28 PM
          Great article, but sadly so true!

          However, this one statement, "According to a study by
          the American Medical Association, 98 percent of males
          who raped boys reported that they were heterosexual",
          makes it sound as though MSM (men who have sex with
          men) don't hardly ever with boys. According to some
          traditionalist researchers' stats, such as from Judith
          Reisman, who I believe wrote "Homosexualization of
          Today's American Youth", up to 40% of all pedophiles
          and ephebophiles (with adolescent boys) are same sex
          attracted and/or frequently have sex with male adults
          as well, or MSM's.

          Again, attribute this to AMA liberal spin taking
          advantage of males in denial of the composite nature
          of their sexual inclinations, as well as some smooth
          misuse of the proper nomenclature, in order to
          preserve and protect their allegiance to political
          correctness and gay activism.


          --- nfttm <nfttm@...> wrote:

          > Laura,
          >
          > Having been involved in the foster care system, I
          > know
          > this to be disturbingly true. So many times the
          > offenders are protected to prevent negative exposure
          > to the facility. Thank you for raising the awareness
          > of this and hopefully, the more that people know,
          > the
          > more they will become involved in preventing or
          > exposing it.
          >
          > --- Laura <exgaydates@...> wrote:
          >
          > > Sexual abuse of Black boys - The Shocking Story
          > >
          > > by Nikitta A. Foston
          > >
          > > IN Woodbridge, New Jersey, a 3-year-old boy was
          > > sexually assaulted
          > > and beat to death by a 10-year-old boy. In Harlem,
          > a
          > > schoolteacher
          > > sodomized a 15-year-old former student and sent
          > > sexually graphic
          > > messages to him over the Internet. In Houston, a
          > > 12-year-old boy was
          > > abused and assaulted by his cousin.
          > >
          > > In Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Atlanta, in
          > cities
          > > across the
          > > United States, young Black boys are being abused
          > and
          > > assaulted in
          > > foster homes, government-run prisons and detention
          > > centers in a
          > > shocking national problem that nobody talks about.
          > >
          > > The statistics are explosive. One out of six boys
          > is
          > > abused before
          > > age 16, and the rates are dramatically higher in
          > > Black areas marred
          > > by systemic poverty, broken homes, high
          > unemployment
          > > rates and
          > > sociological problems.
          > >
          > > Scared, alone, and sometimes imprisoned by shame,
          > > these young boys
          > > often suffer in silence, choosing to avoid public
          > > awareness of their
          > > victimization. "There are elements of shame and
          > > powerlessness
          > > associated with male children who are victims of
          > > sexual abuse," says
          > > Judith Adams, principal to over 600 incarcerated
          > > students at
          > > Jefferson Alternative School, a juvenile detention
          > > center in
          > > Chicago. "Because African-American boys are in an
          > > environment that
          > > applauds 'macho-ism,' they feel powerless when
          > they
          > > are violated and
          > > they feel as though they have failed themselves by
          > > allowing
          > > something like this to happen. So many young men
          > who
          > > haven't been
          > > exposed to anything other than abuse think it is
          > > simply a part of
          > > life."
          > >
          > > A major reason for the increasing rates of sexual
          > > abuse in Black
          > > America is that young Black boys are
          > > indiscriminately arrested at an
          > > early age and sent to local or state facilities
          > > where they are
          > > routinely raped or assaulted. "Sexual assault,
          > > violence and abuse
          > > occur so often in group home settings and foster
          > > homes, and
          > > rehabilitative centers, simply because you don't
          > > have the quality of
          > > care or the necessary supervision. When you don't
          > > have a controlled
          > > environment, you don't have control," says Adams,
          > > whose detention
          > > center in Chicago offers single-celled, visible
          > > rooms in an attempt
          > > to limit such occurrences.
          > >
          > > Yet, even in the supposed confines of a family
          > > environment, where a
          > > child should be protected, boys are still at risk.
          > > Poverty, racism
          > > and broken families exacerbate the problem. "We
          > have
          > > young mothers
          > > who are under 30 years old who are trying to raise
          > > teenage
          > > children," says Adams. "We see our kids coming
          > from
          > > mixed families
          > > and transitory families where the mother or father
          > > has numerous
          > > partners in and out of the house over short
          > periods
          > > of time."
          > >
          > > Part of the difficulty in dealing with child
          > sexual
          > > abuse cases,
          > > experts say, is identifying the victim-perpetrator
          > > relationship. "In
          > > many cases, the abuse isn't thrust upon the boy
          > all
          > > at once. It's
          > > often a slow process, or a courtship, where the
          > > perpetrator
          > > befriends the boy, gains his trust and creates
          > > avenues of access to
          > > him," says Dr. Nathan Hare of San Francisco.
          > >
          > > In fact, a recent study found that over 78 percent
          > > of child victims
          > > knew their attackers. "A predator is less likely
          > to
          > > be the natural
          > > father, but rather, a stepfather, an uncle, cousin
          > > or family friend
          > > who has access and interest in the child," says
          > Dr.
          > > Hare. "It tends
          > > to be someone close by, someone they respect, and
          > > someone with the
          > > need and audacity to approach them."
          > >
          > > Despite the alarming rate of sexual abuse against
          > > young Black boys,
          > > most male perpetrators are not homosexual.
          > According
          > > to a study by
          > > the American Medical Association, 98 percent of
          > > males who raped boys
          > > reported that they were heterosexual. Additional
          > > research suggests
          > > that while male child molesters may have gender
          > > and/or age
          > > preferences, of those who seek out boys, the vast
          > > majority are not
          > > homosexual. They are pedophiles.
          > >
          > > Recent allegations against some celebrities for
          > > sexual assault
          > > indicate that power and pedophilia are the
          > catalysts
          > > behind many
          > > headline stories and that many abusers are
          > reliving
          > > images of their
          > > own abuse. In fact, a study conducted by the
          > Journal
          > > of Traumatic
          > > Stress found that up to 80 percent perpetrators
          > were
          > > themselves
          > > abused.
          > >
          > > In an effort to deal with the escalating problems
          > of
          > > young Black men
          > > and sexual abuse, experts say encouraging parental
          > > involvement is
          > > integral to addressing the issue. "Unfortunately,
          > > some parents would
          > > rather keep quiet once they learn about the abuse
          > of
          > > their child.
          > > They may choose to ignore it because the
          > perpetrator
          > > is a respected
          > > individual such as a father, stepfather or a
          > > priest," says Adams.
          > >
          > > Failing to deal with the problem may be more
          > > damaging than the
          > > problem itself, says Dr. Bell. Nor is a parent's
          > > anger or revenge an
          > > effective strategy. "I tell parents, 'Your child
          > > needs you, they
          > > don't need you in prison.' They need you to be
          > > supportive and to
          > > help them through this. Quite often, when a child
          > is
          > > traumatized, it
          > > is the parents' reaction that shapes the child's
          > > response, and
          >
          === message truncated ===


          __________________________________________________
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        • ctickle777
          Great information, guys. I m wondering how the foster care system can better protect these young boys? I just cringe at the thought of young children being
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 1, 2007
            Great information, guys. I'm wondering how the foster care system
            can better protect these young boys? I just cringe at the thought of
            young children being removed from a harmful environment, only to be
            hand-delivered to a reportedly "safe" foster home and endure even
            more trauma. What types of controls, if any, are in place in the
            foster care system to prevent the abuse of children? Seems as though
            this is a serious problem based upon everyone's responses - and it
            would seem to me to be a broken system in need of significant
            repair, if not a system that needs to be entirely reorganized!!

            Christa

            --- In exgaydiscussionboard@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Morey
            <moreytom@...> wrote:
            >
            > Great article, but sadly so true!
            >
            > However, this one statement, "According to a study by
            > the American Medical Association, 98 percent of males
            > who raped boys reported that they were heterosexual",
            > makes it sound as though MSM (men who have sex with
            > men) don't hardly ever with boys. According to some
            > traditionalist researchers' stats, such as from Judith
            > Reisman, who I believe wrote "Homosexualization of
            > Today's American Youth", up to 40% of all pedophiles
            > and ephebophiles (with adolescent boys) are same sex
            > attracted and/or frequently have sex with male adults
            > as well, or MSM's.
            >
            > Again, attribute this to AMA liberal spin taking
            > advantage of males in denial of the composite nature
            > of their sexual inclinations, as well as some smooth
            > misuse of the proper nomenclature, in order to
            > preserve and protect their allegiance to political
            > correctness and gay activism.
            >
            >
            > --- nfttm <nfttm@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Laura,
            > >
            > > Having been involved in the foster care system, I
            > > know
            > > this to be disturbingly true. So many times the
            > > offenders are protected to prevent negative exposure
            > > to the facility. Thank you for raising the awareness
            > > of this and hopefully, the more that people know,
            > > the
            > > more they will become involved in preventing or
            > > exposing it.
            > >
            > > --- Laura <exgaydates@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > > Sexual abuse of Black boys - The Shocking Story
            > > >
            > > > by Nikitta A. Foston
            > > >
            > > > IN Woodbridge, New Jersey, a 3-year-old boy was
            > > > sexually assaulted
            > > > and beat to death by a 10-year-old boy. In Harlem,
            > > a
            > > > schoolteacher
            > > > sodomized a 15-year-old former student and sent
            > > > sexually graphic
            > > > messages to him over the Internet. In Houston, a
            > > > 12-year-old boy was
            > > > abused and assaulted by his cousin.
            > > >
            > > > In Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Atlanta, in
            > > cities
            > > > across the
            > > > United States, young Black boys are being abused
            > > and
            > > > assaulted in
            > > > foster homes, government-run prisons and detention
            > > > centers in a
            > > > shocking national problem that nobody talks about.
            > > >
            > > > The statistics are explosive. One out of six boys
            > > is
            > > > abused before
            > > > age 16, and the rates are dramatically higher in
            > > > Black areas marred
            > > > by systemic poverty, broken homes, high
            > > unemployment
            > > > rates and
            > > > sociological problems.
            > > >
            > > > Scared, alone, and sometimes imprisoned by shame,
            > > > these young boys
            > > > often suffer in silence, choosing to avoid public
            > > > awareness of their
            > > > victimization. "There are elements of shame and
            > > > powerlessness
            > > > associated with male children who are victims of
            > > > sexual abuse," says
            > > > Judith Adams, principal to over 600 incarcerated
            > > > students at
            > > > Jefferson Alternative School, a juvenile detention
            > > > center in
            > > > Chicago. "Because African-American boys are in an
            > > > environment that
            > > > applauds 'macho-ism,' they feel powerless when
            > > they
            > > > are violated and
            > > > they feel as though they have failed themselves by
            > > > allowing
            > > > something like this to happen. So many young men
            > > who
            > > > haven't been
            > > > exposed to anything other than abuse think it is
            > > > simply a part of
            > > > life."
            > > >
            > > > A major reason for the increasing rates of sexual
            > > > abuse in Black
            > > > America is that young Black boys are
            > > > indiscriminately arrested at an
            > > > early age and sent to local or state facilities
            > > > where they are
            > > > routinely raped or assaulted. "Sexual assault,
            > > > violence and abuse
            > > > occur so often in group home settings and foster
            > > > homes, and
            > > > rehabilitative centers, simply because you don't
            > > > have the quality of
            > > > care or the necessary supervision. When you don't
            > > > have a controlled
            > > > environment, you don't have control," says Adams,
            > > > whose detention
            > > > center in Chicago offers single-celled, visible
            > > > rooms in an attempt
            > > > to limit such occurrences.
            > > >
            > > > Yet, even in the supposed confines of a family
            > > > environment, where a
            > > > child should be protected, boys are still at risk.
            > > > Poverty, racism
            > > > and broken families exacerbate the problem. "We
            > > have
            > > > young mothers
            > > > who are under 30 years old who are trying to raise
            > > > teenage
            > > > children," says Adams. "We see our kids coming
            > > from
            > > > mixed families
            > > > and transitory families where the mother or father
            > > > has numerous
            > > > partners in and out of the house over short
            > > periods
            > > > of time."
            > > >
            > > > Part of the difficulty in dealing with child
            > > sexual
            > > > abuse cases,
            > > > experts say, is identifying the victim-perpetrator
            > > > relationship. "In
            > > > many cases, the abuse isn't thrust upon the boy
            > > all
            > > > at once. It's
            > > > often a slow process, or a courtship, where the
            > > > perpetrator
            > > > befriends the boy, gains his trust and creates
            > > > avenues of access to
            > > > him," says Dr. Nathan Hare of San Francisco.
            > > >
            > > > In fact, a recent study found that over 78 percent
            > > > of child victims
            > > > knew their attackers. "A predator is less likely
            > > to
            > > > be the natural
            > > > father, but rather, a stepfather, an uncle, cousin
            > > > or family friend
            > > > who has access and interest in the child," says
            > > Dr.
            > > > Hare. "It tends
            > > > to be someone close by, someone they respect, and
            > > > someone with the
            > > > need and audacity to approach them."
            > > >
            > > > Despite the alarming rate of sexual abuse against
            > > > young Black boys,
            > > > most male perpetrators are not homosexual.
            > > According
            > > > to a study by
            > > > the American Medical Association, 98 percent of
            > > > males who raped boys
            > > > reported that they were heterosexual. Additional
            > > > research suggests
            > > > that while male child molesters may have gender
            > > > and/or age
            > > > preferences, of those who seek out boys, the vast
            > > > majority are not
            > > > homosexual. They are pedophiles.
            > > >
            > > > Recent allegations against some celebrities for
            > > > sexual assault
            > > > indicate that power and pedophilia are the
            > > catalysts
            > > > behind many
            > > > headline stories and that many abusers are
            > > reliving
            > > > images of their
            > > > own abuse. In fact, a study conducted by the
            > > Journal
            > > > of Traumatic
            > > > Stress found that up to 80 percent perpetrators
            > > were
            > > > themselves
            > > > abused.
            > > >
            > > > In an effort to deal with the escalating problems
            > > of
            > > > young Black men
            > > > and sexual abuse, experts say encouraging parental
            > > > involvement is
            > > > integral to addressing the issue. "Unfortunately,
            > > > some parents would
            > > > rather keep quiet once they learn about the abuse
            > > of
            > > > their child.
            > > > They may choose to ignore it because the
            > > perpetrator
            > > > is a respected
            > > > individual such as a father, stepfather or a
            > > > priest," says Adams.
            > > >
            > > > Failing to deal with the problem may be more
            > > > damaging than the
            > > > problem itself, says Dr. Bell. Nor is a parent's
            > > > anger or revenge an
            > > > effective strategy. "I tell parents, 'Your child
            > > > needs you, they
            > > > don't need you in prison.' They need you to be
            > > > supportive and to
            > > > help them through this. Quite often, when a child
            > > is
            > > > traumatized, it
            > > > is the parents' reaction that shapes the child's
            > > > response, and
            > >
            > === message truncated ===
            >
            >
            > __________________________________________________
            > Do You Yahoo!?
            > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            > http://mail.yahoo.com
            >
          • nfttm
            Christa, I know a great deal about the foster care system and they have a very selective process and memory in identifying the offenders and an even more
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 2, 2007
              Christa,

              I know a great deal about the foster care system and
              they have a very selective process and memory in
              identifying the offenders and an even more selective
              process when it comes to holding them accountable.
              Many times one is considered a snitch if you tell and
              put the home, residential facility or institution in
              jeporady because it can close down and that stops all
              incoming funds - eliminating jobs, etc. I have been a
              very vocal force in speaking up everytime I can about
              any injustice - and there are many - within the foster
              care system. The best way anyone can help is not with
              money and gifts but to get personally involved as a
              volunteer and when an observation is made - REPORT IT!


              --- ctickle777 <ctickle777@...> wrote:

              > Great information, guys. I'm wondering how the
              > foster care system
              > can better protect these young boys? I just cringe
              > at the thought of
              > young children being removed from a harmful
              > environment, only to be
              > hand-delivered to a reportedly "safe" foster home
              > and endure even
              > more trauma. What types of controls, if any, are in
              > place in the
              > foster care system to prevent the abuse of children?
              > Seems as though
              > this is a serious problem based upon everyone's
              > responses - and it
              > would seem to me to be a broken system in need of
              > significant
              > repair, if not a system that needs to be entirely
              > reorganized!!
              >
              > Christa
              >
              > --- In exgaydiscussionboard@yahoogroups.com, Thomas
              > Morey
              > <moreytom@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Great article, but sadly so true!
              > >
              > > However, this one statement, "According to a study
              > by
              > > the American Medical Association, 98 percent of
              > males
              > > who raped boys reported that they were
              > heterosexual",
              > > makes it sound as though MSM (men who have sex
              > with
              > > men) don't hardly ever with boys. According to
              > some
              > > traditionalist researchers' stats, such as from
              > Judith
              > > Reisman, who I believe wrote "Homosexualization of
              > > Today's American Youth", up to 40% of all
              > pedophiles
              > > and ephebophiles (with adolescent boys) are same
              > sex
              > > attracted and/or frequently have sex with male
              > adults
              > > as well, or MSM's.
              > >
              > > Again, attribute this to AMA liberal spin taking
              > > advantage of males in denial of the composite
              > nature
              > > of their sexual inclinations, as well as some
              > smooth
              > > misuse of the proper nomenclature, in order to
              > > preserve and protect their allegiance to political
              > > correctness and gay activism.
              > >
              > >
              > > --- nfttm <nfttm@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > > Laura,
              > > >
              > > > Having been involved in the foster care system,
              > I
              > > > know
              > > > this to be disturbingly true. So many times the
              > > > offenders are protected to prevent negative
              > exposure
              > > > to the facility. Thank you for raising the
              > awareness
              > > > of this and hopefully, the more that people
              > know,
              > > > the
              > > > more they will become involved in preventing or
              > > > exposing it.
              > > >
              > > > --- Laura <exgaydates@...> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > > Sexual abuse of Black boys - The Shocking
              > Story
              > > > >
              > > > > by Nikitta A. Foston
              > > > >
              > > > > IN Woodbridge, New Jersey, a 3-year-old boy
              > was
              > > > > sexually assaulted
              > > > > and beat to death by a 10-year-old boy. In
              > Harlem,
              > > > a
              > > > > schoolteacher
              > > > > sodomized a 15-year-old former student and
              > sent
              > > > > sexually graphic
              > > > > messages to him over the Internet. In Houston,
              > a
              > > > > 12-year-old boy was
              > > > > abused and assaulted by his cousin.
              > > > >
              > > > > In Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Atlanta, in
              > > > cities
              > > > > across the
              > > > > United States, young Black boys are being
              > abused
              > > > and
              > > > > assaulted in
              > > > > foster homes, government-run prisons and
              > detention
              > > > > centers in a
              > > > > shocking national problem that nobody talks
              > about.
              > > > >
              > > > > The statistics are explosive. One out of six
              > boys
              > > > is
              > > > > abused before
              > > > > age 16, and the rates are dramatically higher
              > in
              > > > > Black areas marred
              > > > > by systemic poverty, broken homes, high
              > > > unemployment
              > > > > rates and
              > > > > sociological problems.
              > > > >
              > > > > Scared, alone, and sometimes imprisoned by
              > shame,
              > > > > these young boys
              > > > > often suffer in silence, choosing to avoid
              > public
              > > > > awareness of their
              > > > > victimization. "There are elements of shame
              > and
              > > > > powerlessness
              > > > > associated with male children who are victims
              > of
              > > > > sexual abuse," says
              > > > > Judith Adams, principal to over 600
              > incarcerated
              > > > > students at
              > > > > Jefferson Alternative School, a juvenile
              > detention
              > > > > center in
              > > > > Chicago. "Because African-American boys are in
              > an
              > > > > environment that
              > > > > applauds 'macho-ism,' they feel powerless when
              > > > they
              > > > > are violated and
              > > > > they feel as though they have failed
              > themselves by
              > > > > allowing
              > > > > something like this to happen. So many young
              > men
              > > > who
              > > > > haven't been
              > > > > exposed to anything other than abuse think it
              > is
              > > > > simply a part of
              > > > > life."
              > > > >
              > > > > A major reason for the increasing rates of
              > sexual
              > > > > abuse in Black
              > > > > America is that young Black boys are
              > > > > indiscriminately arrested at an
              > > > > early age and sent to local or state
              > facilities
              > > > > where they are
              > > > > routinely raped or assaulted. "Sexual assault,
              > > > > violence and abuse
              > > > > occur so often in group home settings and
              > foster
              > > > > homes, and
              > > > > rehabilitative centers, simply because you
              > don't
              > > > > have the quality of
              > > > > care or the necessary supervision. When you
              > don't
              > > > > have a controlled
              > > > > environment, you don't have control," says
              > Adams,
              > > > > whose detention
              > > > > center in Chicago offers single-celled,
              > visible
              > > > > rooms in an attempt
              > > > > to limit such occurrences.
              > > > >
              > > > > Yet, even in the supposed confines of a family
              > > > > environment, where a
              > > > > child should be protected, boys are still at
              > risk.
              > > > > Poverty, racism
              > > > > and broken families exacerbate the problem.
              > "We
              > > > have
              > > > > young mothers
              > > > > who are under 30 years old who are trying to
              > raise
              > > > > teenage
              > > > > children," says Adams. "We see our kids coming
              > > > from
              > > > > mixed families
              > > > > and transitory families where the mother or
              > father
              > > > > has numerous
              > > > > partners in and out of the house over short
              > > > periods
              > > > > of time."
              > > > >
              > > > > Part of the difficulty in dealing with child
              > > > sexual
              > > > > abuse cases,
              > > > > experts say, is identifying the
              > victim-perpetrator
              > > > > relationship. "In
              > > > > many cases, the abuse isn't thrust upon the
              > boy
              > > > all
              > > > > at once. It's
              > > > > often a slow process, or a courtship, where
              > the
              > > > > perpetrator
              > > > > befriends the boy, gains his trust and creates
              > > > > avenues of access to
              > > > > him," says Dr. Nathan Hare of San Francisco.
              > > > >
              > > > > In fact, a recent study found that over 78
              > percent
              > > > > of child victims
              > > > > knew their attackers. "A predator is less
              > likely
              > > > to
              > > > > be the natural
              > > > > father, but rather, a stepfather, an uncle,
              > cousin
              > > > > or family friend
              > > > > who has access and interest in the child,"
              > says
              > > > Dr.
              > > > > Hare. "It tends
              > > > > to be someone close by, someone they respect,
              > and
              > > > > someone with the
              > > > > need and audacity to approach them."
              > > > >
              > > > > Despite the alarming rate of sexual abuse
              > against
              > > > > young Black boys,
              > > > > most male perpetrators are not homosexual.
              > > > According
              > > > > to a study by
              > > > > the American Medical Association, 98 percent
              > of
              > > > > males who raped boys
              > > > > reported that they were heterosexual.
              > Additional
              > > > > research suggests
              > > > > that while male child molesters may have
              > gender
              > > > > and/or age
              > > > > preferences, of those who seek out boys, the
              > vast
              > > > > majority are not
              > > > > homosexual. They are pedophiles.
              > > > >
              > > > > Recent allegations against some celebrities
              > for
              > > > > sexual assault
              > > > > indicate that power and pedophilia are the
              > > > catalysts
              > > > > behind many
              > > > > headline stories and that many abusers are
              > > > reliving
              > > > > images of their
              > > > > own abuse. In fact, a study conducted by the
              > > > Journal
              > > > > of Traumatic
              > > > > Stress found that up to 80 percent
              > perpetrators
              > > > were
              > > > > themselves
              > > > > abused.
              > > > >
              > > > > In an effort to deal with the escalating
              > problems
              > > > of
              > > > > young Black men
              > > > > and sexual abuse, experts say encouraging
              > parental
              > > > > involvement is
              > > > > integral to addressing the issue.
              > "Unfortunately,
              > > > > some parents would
              > > > > rather keep quiet once they learn about the
              > abuse
              > > > of
              > > > > their child.
              > > > > They may choose to ignore it because the
              > > > perpetrator
              > > > > is a respected
              > > > > individual such as a father, stepfather or a
              > > > > priest," says Adams.
              > > > >
              > > > > Failing to deal with the problem may be more
              > > > > damaging than the
              > > > > problem itself, says Dr. Bell. Nor is a
              > parent's
              > > > > anger or revenge an
              > > > > effective strategy. "I tell parents, 'Your
              > child
              > > > > needs you, they
              > > > > don't need you in prison.' They need you to be
              > > > > supportive and to
              > > > > help them through this. Quite often, when a
              > child
              > > > is
              > > > > traumatized, it
              > > > > is the parents' reaction that shapes the
              > child's
              > > > > response, and
              > > >
              > > === message truncated ===
              > >
              > >
              > > __________________________________________________
              > > Do You Yahoo!?
              > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
              > protection around
              > > http://mail.yahoo.com
              > >
              >
              >
              >


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