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RE: [ex-Libertarian] introduction

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  • Heidi I. Jones
    ... The ... says ... Yep. It s called the Nash Equilibrium: a kind of optimal strategy for games involving two or more players, whereby the players reach an
    Message 1 of 10 , May 1, 2005
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      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "Mark Monson" <monsonmark@...>
      > To: <ex-Libertarian@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 9:59 PM
      > Subject: Re: [ex-Libertarian] introduction
      > > There are those who affirm the one side and demonize the other.
      The
      > Marxist
      > > says the good of the community is everything. The Libertarian
      says
      > personal
      > > choice is everything. They are both wrong.

      Yep. It's called the Nash Equilibrium: a kind of optimal strategy for
      games involving two or more players, whereby the players reach an
      outcome to mutual advantage
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nash_equilibrium

      Another way to look at it (for social purposes) is that if individuals
      do what's best for the individual and the community/society/group, the
      best out come will be achieved. (this is a loose interpretation)
    • hoorpaarkraat
      ... Actually, I consider this often-but-not-always myself. It s just that you can think of so many different situations where the overly simplistic, natural
      Message 2 of 10 , May 2, 2005
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        --- In ex-Libertarian@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin" <lightonliberty@a...>
        wrote:
        > --- In ex-Libertarian@yahoogroups.com, "Jonathan Hammond"
        > <dmlaenker@m...> wrote:
        > >
        > > "I certainly do not deny that a business which provides a better
        > > product is going to have more business, and be more successful, in
        > > the market."
        > >
        > > I consider this often-but-not-always.

        Actually, I consider this often-but-not-always myself. It's just that
        you can think of so many different situations where the overly
        simplistic, natural law models of economics fail, that it's impossible
        for a person like me who isn't a professional to know all of them.
        That's the whole point, isn't it? So many things are "often-but-not-
        always", but Libertarianism seems to move people, at least closer to
        the position of "always". It's not that all Libertarians think that
        way, but Libertarianism certainly encourages them to ignore more of
        the occasions that don't fit into the "always" category.
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