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Weblogs in Education

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  • Agata Zieba-Warcholak
    I have just received this e-mail with a list of really interesting weblogs dealing with education. I thought some of the Webheads might be interested in this
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 29, 2004
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      I have just received this e-mail with a list of really interesting weblogs dealing with education.

      I thought some of the Webheads might be interested in this topic.

      Cheers,
      Agata


      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


      There is a discussion on POD about the use of weblogs for helping faculty
      become reflective practitioners. The following list of blogs has some
      outstanding examples of how blogs can be used with students as well as with
      faculty: (Thanks to Derek Chirnside from New Zealand for the list). I'm
      very impressed by Mike Arnzen's (SetonHall) reflections on the practice of
      teaching. What I most love is that technology, professional practice, and
      instructional are seamless in his thinking.


      >The answer of course is yes, blogs can help reflective preactice. It is
      >an art in some respects, and needs some careful lead ins.
      >
      >I think if the link doesn't get mangled you will find some comments of
      >interest here:
      >
      >http://www.jonathanbriggs.com/articles/Designing%20blogs%20for%20education_335BA.html
      ><http://www.jonathanbriggs.com/articles/Designing%20blogs%20for%20education_335BA.html>
      >(I'm highlighting the section that says 'Blogging is not a trivial
      >activity') This was a talk I attended today.
      >
      >See:
      >http://possibleworlds.blogs.com/blogsperiment/2004/09/reflective_prac.html
      ><http://possibleworlds.blogs.com/blogsperiment/2004/09/reflective_prac.html>
      >(some links to some basic research) (and this tells you how basic it is!!)
      >
      >http://blogs.setonhill.edu/MikeArnzen/
      ><http://blogs.setonhill.edu/MikeArnzen/> is a veryhigh level blog.
      >
      >http://www.progsoc.org/~vik/blogs.php
      ><http://www.progsoc.org/~vik/blogs.php> puts a different spin on
      >things. Take JB's comment (not trivial) and ideas in this web page
      >(reflections on blogging) including this:
      >"The more reflective style of blog mentioned above can, of course, be
      >tremendous tool for self discovery. Initially, a blogger might just do a
      >brain-dump into their blog, but over time, particularly when others read
      >and comment on their journal, the blogger may begin to delve a bit deeper
      >into their thoughts, s/he might hold onto an idea and tease out some
      >possibilities from it. Confidence in writing and expression will hopefully
      >improve." and reflective practice could emerge.
      >
      >Educational use of blogs is new. Probably about a year. So while the
      >answer is yes, Blogs can help, we don't yet know what is possible, and we
      >are only just learning how to do it. 'We' in this case, meaning as much
      >as I can find out from anyone anywhere. And I don't know where I am going
      >to end up in my views on the role of a facilitator.
      >
      >We are looking at Blog tools in our institution, offering flexible blogs
      >and/or reflective journals (public or private) to staff and students
      >though our home grown virtual learning environment/intranet. (which is
      >available free an open source)
      >
      >see http://www.interactlms.org <http://www.interactlms.org>
      >
      >We have had an 80 plus cross institution community of lecturers online at
      >http://t4t4t.interact.ac.nz/spaces/space.php?space_key=112
      ><http://t4t4t.interact.ac.nz/spaces/space.php?space_key=112> as a pilot
      >for a few months now. For some (with NO orientation) blogs have been
      >great. With orientation and support (and we think we know where to go in
      >this direction) we think we could create some valuable reflection for a
      >lot more.
      >
      >-Derek
      >Christchurch College of Education




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