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Brain dance

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  • Susanne Nyrop
    Dear Buth and Vance, I an so grateful to Buth for taking and sharing these very lively and lovely situations from an unplugged musical event, and to Vance
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 7, 2004
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      Dear Buth and Vance,

      I an so grateful to Buth for taking and sharing these very lively and lovely
      situations from an "unplugged" musical event, and to Vance for doing the
      dance demo, as well as sharing with us all how to ameliorate the images with
      a well proportioned shrink procedure so that the faces will look less
      squeezed.
      Dancing is something that can only be simluated wirh great difficulty -
      although I know that some dance lessons are given online.

      http://www.linedancelessons.com/
      http://future.newsday.com/8/fvideo.htm

      Besides, recent brain research has been dealing with the question on what
      "switches on in the head of a dancer during a performance? "The difference
      between Baryshnikov and me could be that his cerebellum works better than
      mine," says James Ashe, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. This small
      part of the brain tissue called cerebellum at the back and base of your
      skull crackles with electrical activity when lessons learned during a
      training session shine through in performance. Ashe's work explains with
      science what many dancers know intuitively. The cerebellum is unable to
      multitask,this is why performing new coreography demands a clear mind...
      http://www.findarticles.com/cf_dls/m1083/12_76/94671982/p1/article.jhtml



      hehe; I get a little hint that those of you who are routined & renowned
      multitaskers may have rehearsed the online facilitation choreography deeply
      :-)

      Sus
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