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  • Teresa Almeida d'Eca
    Hello, everybody! I just came across an interesting article titled Ten Ways Online Education Matches, or Surpasses, Face-to-Face Learning by Mark Kassop.
    Message 1 of 21 , May 6, 2003
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      Hello, everybody!

      I just came across an interesting article titled "Ten Ways Online Education Matches, or Surpasses, Face-to-Face Learning" by Mark Kassop.

      "Can online courses match traditional face-to-face (F2F) courses in academic quality and rigor? Can online courses achieve the same learning objectives as F2F courses? Can students learn as much and as well online as they do in F2F courses? Not only is the answer to these questions a resounding "yes," but there are many ways that online courses may actually surpass traditional F2F classes in quality and rigor."

      http://ts.mivu.org/default.asp?show=article&id=1059

      Hope it may be of interest to some of you.

      Teresa

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • glenngo@aol.com
      Dear Teresa, In which journal may this interesting article be found? Thanks. David (a silent member) glenngo@aol.com
      Message 2 of 21 , May 7, 2003
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        Dear Teresa,
        In which journal may this interesting article be found?
        Thanks.
        David (a silent member)
        glenngo@...
      • Teresa Almeida d'Eca
        Hi, everybody! Here s an interesting read that has a lot to do with WiA. I really enjoyed it! Online learning communitites: Investigating a design framework
        Message 3 of 21 , Dec 19, 2004
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          Hi, everybody!

          Here's an interesting read that has a lot to do with WiA. I really enjoyed it!

          Online learning communitites: Investigating a design framework

          "This paper reports the development of a design framework intended to support and guide online instructors in the development of a learning community. The study was guided by an investigation of contemporary literature focused on the community construct, online learning community development and the collaborative construction of knowledge and the practices of experienced professionals working in the field. The intended outcome is a design framework that may be useful in guiding instructors in the development of said communities."

          http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet19/brook.html


          Season's greetings!

          Teresa

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Barbara Dieu
          An interesting article in Techlearning News (recovered from Stephen Downes Old Daily) Editor s Notebook: School of the Future World Summit
          Message 4 of 21 , Aug 25, 2005
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            An interesting article in Techlearning News (recovered from Stephen Downes
            Old Daily)

            Editor's Notebook: School of the Future World Summit
            http://techlearning.com/story/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=166402604

            Regards from Brazil,
            Bee

            Barbara Dieu
            http://dekita.org
            http://members.tripod.com/the_english_dept
          • Teresa Almeida d'Eca
            Interesting, indeed, Bee! I ve added to the OLE page. Tanks for sharing! Hugs, Teresa
            Message 5 of 21 , Aug 26, 2005
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              Interesting, indeed, Bee!

              I've added to the OLE page. Tanks for sharing!

              Hugs,

              Teresa


              > Editor's Notebook: School of the Future World Summit
              > http://techlearning.com/story/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=166402604
              > Bee
            • Teresa Almeida d'Eca
              Hi, everyone! Please excuse the second cross-post today, but I ve just finished reading a very interesting article by David Warlick that I strongly suggest you
              Message 6 of 21 , Nov 1, 2006
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                Hi, everyone!

                Please excuse the second cross-post today, but I've just finished reading a very interesting article by David Warlick that I strongly suggest you read.

                A Day in the Life of Web 2.0
                http://www.techlearning.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=193200296&pgno=1

                Hugs, Teresa

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Elizabeth Hanson-Smith
                Great article, Tere- Thank you! --Elizabeth ... reading a very interesting article by David Warlick that I strongly suggest you read.
                Message 7 of 21 , Nov 2, 2006
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                  Great article, Tere-
                  Thank you!
                  --Elizabeth

                  --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, "Teresa Almeida d'Eca"
                  <tmvaz@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi, everyone!
                  >
                  > Please excuse the second cross-post today, but I've just finished
                  reading a very interesting article by David Warlick that I strongly
                  suggest you read.
                  >
                  > A Day in the Life of Web 2.0
                  > http://www.techlearning.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=193200296&pgno=1
                  >
                  > Hugs, Teresa
                • dnewson2001
                  Teresa, I have just read David Warlick s article: A Day in the life of Web 2.0. Thanks greatly for the reference. It paints a very ideal picture, though,
                  Message 8 of 21 , Nov 3, 2006
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                    Teresa,

                    I have just read David Warlick's article: A Day in the life of Web
                    2.0. Thanks greatly for the reference.

                    It paints a very ideal picture, though, doesn't it? All those
                    efficient, well-organised, motivated teachers and schools heads and
                    librarians, and interested, computer-literate parents. Not a whiff of
                    shortage of funds, bad pupil behavious, schools or kids without PCs or
                    without the slightest interest in using them for educational
                    purposes.I'm afraid Germany, as I experience it, is not going to be a
                    place for such a digital paradise. My wife's university students may
                    answer text messages instantly, as long as they are not from their
                    parents, but many of them don't seem to check emails for days or even
                    weeks on end.Many schools have computer labs, but they are places you
                    go into by appointment on certain days, eletronic communications with
                    wikis, blogs, RSS aren't imbedded in day-to-day teaching and learning.
                    Teachers aren't to blame. There are natiional and local guide-lines to
                    follow, text books have to be chosen from a list recommeed by local
                    government, and teachers have to keep in step with colleagues if they
                    are teaching parallel classes so their pupils can do the regular class
                    tests. And, especially amongst teacher and university people, there
                    seems to me to be scepticism about "the internet"."Young people spend
                    too much time as it is, watching TV, sending and receiving text
                    messages, fiddling with their play stations. They do not need more
                    contact with the digital world." And apart from those people whose
                    children have gone abroad and introduced their parents to Skype, so
                    many people around me are suspicious, deeply suspicious of emailing,
                    surfing and, heavens above, electronic banking. If I pull out my
                    simple MP3 player, they shake their heads and obviously think: "He's
                    like a teenager". And when I mention emailing, someone always says:
                    "The old-fashioned, hand-written letter is good enugh for me.

                    Dennis
                  • YD Chen
                    Dear Dennis, You feedback is just what I was going to say but my English is not that good so as to describe the situation here in my university. Students would
                    Message 9 of 21 , Nov 3, 2006
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                      Dear Dennis,
                      You feedback is just what I was going to say but my English is not that good so as to describe the situation here in my university. Students would play games online for 24 hours if possible instead of learning...........
                      Don

                      dnewson2001 <djn@...> wrote:
                      Teresa,

                      I have just read David Warlick's article: A Day in the life of Web
                      2.0. Thanks greatly for the reference.

                      It paints a very ideal picture, though, doesn't it? All those
                      efficient, well-organised, motivated teachers and schools heads and
                      librarians, and interested, computer-literate parents. Not a whiff of
                      shortage of funds, bad pupil behavious, schools or kids without PCs or
                      without the slightest interest in using them for educational
                      purposes.I'm afraid Germany, as I experience it, is not going to be a
                      place for such a digital paradise. My wife's university students may
                      answer text messages instantly, as long as they are not from their
                      parents, but many of them don't seem to check emails for days or even
                      weeks on end.Many schools have computer labs, but they are places you
                      go into by appointment on certain days, eletronic communications with
                      wikis, blogs, RSS aren't imbedded in day-to-day teaching and learning.
                      Teachers aren't to blame. There are natiional and local guide-lines to
                      follow, text books have to be chosen from a list recommeed by local
                      government, and teachers have to keep in step with colleagues if they
                      are teaching parallel classes so their pupils can do the regular class
                      tests. And, especially amongst teacher and university people, there
                      seems to me to be scepticism about "the internet"."Young people spend
                      too much time as it is, watching TV, sending and receiving text
                      messages, fiddling with their play stations. They do not need more
                      contact with the digital world." And apart from those people whose
                      children have gone abroad and introduced their parents to Skype, so
                      many people around me are suspicious, deeply suspicious of emailing,
                      surfing and, heavens above, electronic banking. If I pull out my
                      simple MP3 player, they shake their heads and obviously think: "He's
                      like a teenager". And when I mention emailing, someone always says:
                      "The old-fashioned, hand-written letter is good enugh for me.

                      Dennis






                      ---------------------------------
                      Cheap Talk? Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call rates.

                      ---------------------------------
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                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Michael Coghlan
                      Dennis, Yaodong and all, What I liked about the scenario presented in David Warlick s article (A Day in the life of Web 2.0 -
                      Message 10 of 21 , Nov 4, 2006
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                        Dennis, Yaodong and all,

                        What I liked about the scenario presented in David Warlick's article
                        (A Day in the life of Web 2.0 -
                        http://www.techlearning.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=193200296&pgno=1)
                        is that it gives examples of what could be done if you had just a few
                        motivated teachers (or administrators) who chose to work like this,
                        independent of whether or not you have students who are motivated to
                        use computers for educational purposes. So in OUR working lives we
                        can start changing the way we do things (which is what webheads have
                        always done with each other anyway).

                        But yes Dennis - you would need access to Internet enabled computers!

                        - Michael,

                        At 01:56 AM 4/11/2006, you wrote:

                        >Dear Dennis,
                        >You feedback is just what I was going to say but my English is not
                        >that good so as to describe the situation here in my university.
                        >Students would play games online for 24 hours if possible instead of
                        >learning...........
                        >Don
                        >
                        >dnewson2001 <<mailto:djn%40dennisnewson.de>djn@...> wrote:
                        >Teresa,
                        >
                        >I have just read David Warlick's article: A Day in the life of Web
                        >2.0. Thanks greatly for the reference.
                        >
                        >It paints a very ideal picture, though, doesn't it? All those
                        >efficient, well-organised, motivated teachers and schools heads and
                        >librarians, and interested, computer-literate parents. Not a whiff of
                        >shortage of funds, bad pupil behavious, schools or kids without PCs or
                        >without the slightest interest in using them for educational
                        >purposes.I'm afraid Germany, as I experience it, is not going to be a
                        >place for such a digital paradise. My wife's university students may
                        >answer text messages instantly, as long as they are not from their
                        >parents, but many of them don't seem to check emails for days or even
                        >weeks on end.Many schools have computer labs, but they are places you
                        >go into by appointment on certain days, eletronic communications with
                        >wikis, blogs, RSS aren't imbedded in day-to-day teaching and learning.
                        >Teachers aren't to blame. There are natiional and local guide-lines to
                        >follow, text books have to be chosen from a list recommeed by local
                        >government, and teachers have to keep in step with colleagues if they
                        >are teaching parallel classes so their pupils can do the regular class
                        >tests. And, especially amongst teacher and university people, there
                        >seems to me to be scepticism about "the internet"."Young people spend
                        >too much time as it is, watching TV, sending and receiving text
                        >messages, fiddling with their play stations. They do not need more
                        >contact with the digital world." And apart from those people whose
                        >children have gone abroad and introduced their parents to Skype, so
                        >many people around me are suspicious, deeply suspicious of emailing,
                        >surfing and, heavens above, electronic banking. If I pull out my
                        >simple MP3 player, they shake their heads and obviously think: "He's
                        >like a teenager". And when I mention emailing, someone always says:
                        >"The old-fashioned, hand-written letter is good enugh for me.
                        >
                        >Dennis
                        >
                        >---------------------------------
                        >Cheap Talk? Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call rates.
                        >
                        >---------------------------------
                        >Get your email and see which of your friends are online - Right on
                        >the new Yahoo.com
                        >
                        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >No virus found in this incoming message.
                        >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                        >Version: 7.1.409 / Virus Database: 268.13.22/512 - Release Date: 1/11/2006


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Rita Zeinstejer
                        Dennis, dear friend, you seem to have described a perfect picture of what s going on here in Argentina, which, sorry to say....., makes me feel better..:-) I
                        Message 11 of 21 , Nov 4, 2006
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                          Dennis, dear friend, you seem to have described a perfect picture of what's going on here in Argentina, which, sorry to say....., makes me feel better..:-)
                          I thought that because I live in the "south pole", away from the countries where advances spread more easily, and are accepted more readily...., being looked upon as a geek was sort of "expected"..., though, to be honest, I need to get my own ego boosted by connecting with you all to see I'm not alone...;-)))

                          But if that's the picture in Germany, as well, I sadly conclude that we won't be seeing too much of a change during our short life... I don't want to read pessimistic, but we are soooooooo very few, everywhere! In the private institute I work at, I'm the only one, and we are 60 teachers, who's adapted and integrated some tools in my daily teaching, and have managed to do so despite having to comply with a syllabus, a book, and specific exam preparation...(Cambridge CAE)

                          Anyway, here we all are, striving to survive and to follow our gut feelings..., as true believers and advocates of our common ideas and purposes. Let's pat ourselves on our backs in turns, one day we'll be a multitude...;-))

                          Hugs from the south pole!!!!

                          Rita

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Teresa Almeida d'Eca
                          Hi, Dennis! I m glad you liked David Warlick s article. I think it paints a picture that s accessible to anyone withsome e-literacy. It s very similar to what
                          Message 12 of 21 , Nov 4, 2006
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                            Hi, Dennis!

                            I'm glad you liked David Warlick's article.

                            I think it paints a picture that's accessible to anyone withsome e-literacy. It's very similar to what we, Webheads, do among ourselves and with our students. It's similar to what I'm doing with my students, though with blogs.

                            One of the non-similarities is that my school board, and most teachers, couldn't care less about what I do! And I couldn't care less that they don't, because what's important is that my students truly enjoy what we do and, above all, learn from it. As a mother commented yesterday evening in the Have Fun with English!2 blog, CALL lessons "are also a pleasant way of learning without knowing", without perceiving it. Absolutely.

                            Portugal is generally out of step and behind re: the rest of Europe, but not in terms of some of these new tools. Kids love new gadjets and will use them if they're shown how. That's why I think it's so important to blend these new tools in our traditional lessons. And my kids like both blogs so much that they will go to the school library during their lunch break and send me messages.

                            Computers have been in Portuguese school for 20 years, however, teachers are still very far behind. They've had enough time to be far ahead, because there has been training, though not the type I like. I believe the biggest problem has been, and will continue to be, that my colleagues in general think this is all too much work and trouble, and they don't have the time!!! How come me, and a few others like me, do?!

                            There are many computers at my school and, as I've said on other occasions, I'm the only one using them in an interactive way. I'm not joking! The only other groups that use computers now and then are the Math and Geography groups, basically for showing content. We even have an interactive whiteboard this year (thanks for the link to the video, I'll add it to my OLE and EFL/ESL pages) and will be getting 24 laptops this month. What for?! No comment!!!

                            Well, enough said! These are my two Portuguese cents.

                            Hugs, Teresa

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Dafne
                            Dennis and all, I have to agree regarding teachers´attitude towards ICT. I have been lucky to motivate a small group (around 6) of teachers in my department
                            Message 13 of 21 , Nov 4, 2006
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                              Dennis and all,

                              I have to agree regarding teachers´attitude towards
                              ICT. I have been lucky to motivate a small group
                              (around 6) of teachers in my department (aroud 40
                              teachers) who are now using web tools.

                              However, I am very happy to say, that my students are
                              really motivated and working comfortably with all the
                              tools we use in our classes (both graduate and
                              undergraduate). In my English for architecture course
                              we are using many tools. In 8 weeks my students have
                              been regularly using:

                              pbwiki, wikispaces, podomatic, springdoo, mychingo,
                              Gliffy, 3D-architecture studio, Google SketchUp,
                              bubble share, Moodle, Quia and SitePal

                              And they just love them all. They keep asking if they
                              will also be using computers next trimester.

                              Last week when I was out of town, and I they had to
                              work on their own, they not only completed the
                              activities for the week, they had the time to record a
                              song for me :-) You can listen to it here:
                              http://id2124-dg.wikispaces.com

                              So, I don´t give up, I keep using web tools, and
                              trying to recruite more teachers. I teach what I
                              preach :-)


                              hugs,

                              Daf

                              --- Rita Zeinstejer <rita@...> wrote:

                              > Dennis, dear friend, you seem to have described a
                              > perfect picture of what's going on here in
                              > Argentina, which, sorry to say....., makes me feel
                              > better..:-)
                              > I thought that because I live in the "south pole",
                              > away from the countries where advances spread more
                              > easily, and are accepted more readily...., being
                              > looked upon as a geek was sort of "expected"...,
                              > though, to be honest, I need to get my own ego
                              > boosted by connecting with you all to see I'm not
                              > alone...;-)))
                              >
                              > But if that's the picture in Germany, as well, I
                              > sadly conclude that we won't be seeing too much of a
                              > change during our short life... I don't want to read
                              > pessimistic, but we are soooooooo very few,
                              > everywhere! In the private institute I work at, I'm
                              > the only one, and we are 60 teachers, who's adapted
                              > and integrated some tools in my daily teaching, and
                              > have managed to do so despite having to comply with
                              > a syllabus, a book, and specific exam
                              > preparation...(Cambridge CAE)
                              >
                              > Anyway, here we all are, striving to survive and to
                              > follow our gut feelings..., as true believers and
                              > advocates of our common ideas and purposes. Let's
                              > pat ourselves on our backs in turns, one day we'll
                              > be a multitude...;-))
                              >
                              > Hugs from the south pole!!!!
                              >
                              > Rita
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                              > removed]
                              >
                              >




                              ____________________________________________________________________________________
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                            • Michael Coghlan
                              ... Rita - I think you ve written about it before, but WHY are you the only one of 60 teachers who is interested in this stuff? Lack of access? Laziness? I do
                              Message 14 of 21 , Nov 4, 2006
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                                At 12:28 AM 5/11/2006, you wrote:

                                >Dennis, dear friend, you seem to have described a perfect picture of
                                >what's going on here in Argentina, which, sorry to say....., makes
                                >me feel better..:-)
                                >I thought that because I live in the "south pole", away from the
                                >countries where advances spread more easily, and are accepted more
                                >readily...., being looked upon as a geek was sort of "expected"...,
                                >though, to be honest, I need to get my own ego boosted by connecting
                                >with you all to see I'm not alone...;-)))
                                >
                                >But if that's the picture in Germany, as well, I sadly conclude that
                                >we won't be seeing too much of a change during our short life... I
                                >don't want to read pessimistic, but we are soooooooo very few,
                                >everywhere! In the private institute I work at, I'm the only one,
                                >and we are 60 teachers, who's adapted and integrated some tools in
                                >my daily teaching, and have managed to do so despite having to
                                >comply with a syllabus, a book, and specific exam preparation...(Cambridge CAE)

                                Rita - I think you've written about it before, but WHY are you the
                                only one of 60 teachers who is interested in this stuff? Lack of
                                access? Laziness? I do find it hard to believe that you don't have at
                                least a few other teachers on your staff who are willing to try and
                                incorporate web based approaches in their teaching.

                                - Michael.



                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Rita Zeinstejer
                                Hi, dear Michael, As soon as I sent my previous email, where I wrote AGAIN, yes, sorry about this....:-(..., about my loneliness on this stuff, I realized
                                Message 15 of 21 , Nov 5, 2006
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                                  Hi, dear Michael,

                                  As soon as I sent my previous email, where I wrote AGAIN, yes, sorry about this....:-(..., about my "loneliness" on this stuff, I realized I'd make a mistake. In fact, it's not only the 60 teachers who are ignoring all this, but thousands of EFL teachers in Rosario..., if you can believe that...

                                  I´ve been conducting the CALL SIG here for 6 years now, through the Association of Teachers of English in Rosario, and I've always had JUST between 4 and 5 teachers attending sessions (which I hold once a month). And out of these 5 I have this year, only ONE is intrinsically involved, the other 4, just "comply" with requisites...., and follow a very slow pace...

                                  Why??? That's my hardest question, a rhetorical one... They will complain about their lack of time, about low pay and more demands, and those very few who are somehow working with the computer use it to retrieve information and for email writing. Incredible but true, believe me.
                                  I've tried giving open presentations, free sessions, and some will turn up and show interest, but that's it.

                                  Anyway, as "optimist Tere" says..., it'll be a question of time, and in the meantime, we need to go on preaching. True, "Rome was not built in a day".

                                  Sorry to be dwelling on this once again, just needed to answer Michael's question, if this can be called an answer.

                                  Thanks, Michael, for your interest, can understand you disbelief!

                                  Rita

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • John Hibbs
                                  ... I am not involved in teaching English and I am not involved in trying to motivate teachers to use the new tools. But I am involved in a collegiate
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Nov 5, 2006
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                                    At 2:03 AM +1030 11/5/06, Michael Coghlan wrote:
                                    >
                                    >Rita - I think you've written about it before, but WHY are you the
                                    >only one of 60 teachers who is interested in this stuff? Lack of
                                    >access? Laziness? I do find it hard to believe that you don't have at
                                    >least a few other teachers on your staff who are willing to try and
                                    >incorporate web based approaches in their teaching.


                                    I am not involved in teaching English and I am not involved in trying
                                    to motivate teachers to use the new tools. But I am involved in a
                                    collegiate organizations where the leaders of same are as reluctant
                                    to use the new tools as those Rita talks about. They still operate
                                    as if there is no Internet -- or that the best (and exclusive?) use
                                    of the Net is to pass around jokes, or send birthday cards, or chit
                                    chat. VoiP - you kidding. Web 2.0? huh -- what kind of nut are your?
                                    desktop sharing? sure, you can put your coffee on my desk anytime and
                                    we can have a nice talk. Empower students? heck, we are doing that
                                    all the time; that's why we give them the same tests every year.
                                  • Carla arena
                                    Dear all, Michael, Dennis, Tere, Daf, Rita, Webheads, My situation in Brazil is no different from you. In the Binational I teach there are 150 English teachers
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Nov 6, 2006
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                                      Dear all, Michael, Dennis, Tere, Daf, Rita, Webheads,

                                      My situation in Brazil is no different from you. In the Binational I teach
                                      there are 150 English teachers (yes, 150!) and I'd say that Erika and I are
                                      the ones really involved in Ed Tech. We could count on one hand the teachers
                                      that also have been carrying on some interactive online collaboration, but
                                      only when we give them full support (creating blogs, helping with tools and
                                      even answering emails!!!).

                                      We don't have laptops for students, but we do have a computer lab with nice
                                      computers. The computer lab is always packed, but the teachers generally go
                                      there to do the online exercises we prepare and make it available on an
                                      e-folder for the school with all levels we have, separated by units. Most of
                                      the online exercises could be done at home, but we never give up! We keep
                                      offering teacher training on how to use tech tools in an interactive,
                                      motivating way. We've had some success with online collaboration, but the
                                      teachers are not willing to try by themselves. We need to be there, checking
                                      if the project is moving ahead...

                                      We hold all kinds of training throughout the semester and during in-service.
                                      The attendance is good, teachers think what we do is "Cool", but not for
                                      them!

                                      Well, here we are and we never give up!

                                      Carla

                                      On 11/5/06, Rita Zeinstejer <rita@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Hi, dear Michael,
                                      >
                                      > As soon as I sent my previous email, where I wrote AGAIN, yes, sorry about
                                      > this....:-(..., about my "loneliness" on this stuff, I realized I'd make a
                                      > mistake. In fact, it's not only the 60 teachers who are ignoring all this,
                                      > but thousands of EFL teachers in Rosario..., if you can believe that...
                                      >
                                      > I´ve been conducting the CALL SIG here for 6 years now, through the
                                      > Association of Teachers of English in Rosario, and I've always had JUST
                                      > between 4 and 5 teachers attending sessions (which I hold once a month). And
                                      > out of these 5 I have this year, only ONE is intrinsically involved, the
                                      > other 4, just "comply" with requisites...., and follow a very slow pace...
                                      >
                                      > Why??? That's my hardest question, a rhetorical one... They will complain
                                      > about their lack of time, about low pay and more demands, and those very few
                                      > who are somehow working with the computer use it to retrieve information and
                                      > for email writing. Incredible but true, believe me.
                                      > I've tried giving open presentations, free sessions, and some will turn up
                                      > and show interest, but that's it.
                                      >
                                      > Anyway, as "optimist Tere" says..., it'll be a question of time, and in
                                      > the meantime, we need to go on preaching. True, "Rome was not built in a
                                      > day".
                                      >
                                      > Sorry to be dwelling on this once again, just needed to answer Michael's
                                      > question, if this can be called an answer.
                                      >
                                      > Thanks, Michael, for your interest, can understand you disbelief!
                                      >
                                      > Rita
                                      >
                                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >


                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Dennis Newson
                                      Carla, Thanks for writing. (Very busy people are the ones that always find time, because they are good at using their time, I think). Perwonally, I find it
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Nov 6, 2006
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                                        Carla,

                                        Thanks for writing. (Very busy people are the ones that always find time,
                                        because they are good at using their time, I think). Perwonally, I find it
                                        very helpful, more than just interesting, to learn how it is for others. It
                                        relatavises one's own experience.

                                        Best wishes,

                                        Dennis


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                                      • Teresa Almeida d'Eca
                                        Hello, Webheads! The NYTimes Online has an interesting article this morning related to our degree of connectedness (link 1) and then testimonies of people who
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Aug 16, 2010
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                                          Hello, Webheads!

                                          The NYTimes Online has an interesting article this morning related to our degree of connectedness (link 1) and then testimonies of people who took part in their unplugged challenge with some interesting lessons learned (link 2). Hope you enjoy them, as I did. After all, they're related to what I wrote about.

                                          Outdoors and Out of Reach, Studying the Brain
                                          http://tinyurl.com/26ktj4a

                                          The Unplugged Challenge
                                          http://tinyurl.com/26ugtep

                                          Hugs, Teresa


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                                        • Barbara Dieu
                                          Great, Teresa. Thank you. Let me complement it with this podcast and various links: A Brief History of Noise
                                          Message 20 of 21 , Aug 16, 2010
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                                            Great, Teresa. Thank you.
                                            Let me complement it with this podcast and various links:
                                            A Brief History of Noise
                                            http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/mediaberkman/2010/08/05/radio-berkman-161-a-brief-history-of-noise/

                                            Warm regards,
                                            B.

                                            --
                                            Barbara Dieu
                                            http://barbaradieu.com
                                            http://beespace.net


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                                          • Teresa Almeida d'Eca
                                            Bee, I liked the interview so much that afterwards I listened to her (Kate Crawford s) presentation Mobile Social Media and Attention followed by a long Q&A
                                            Message 21 of 21 , Aug 16, 2010
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                                              Bee, I liked the interview so much that afterwards I listened to her (Kate
                                              Crawford's) presentation "Mobile Social Media and Attention" followed by a
                                              long Q&A time. Thanks. :-)
                                              http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/mediaberkman/2010/08/04/kate-crawford-on-mobile-social-media-and-attention/

                                              Hugs, Teresa



                                              Sent: Monday, August 16, 2010 2:09 PM
                                              Subject: Re: [evonline2002_webheads] interesting article


                                              > Great, Teresa. Thank you.
                                              > Let me complement it with this podcast and various links:
                                              > A Brief History of Noise
                                              > http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/mediaberkman/2010/08/05/radio-berkman-161-a-brief-history-of-noise/
                                              >
                                              > Warm regards,
                                              > B.
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