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Re: Authoring tools for supplementary language activities

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  • Vance
    Hi folks, I m still curating your comments here http://toolkit4learning.blogspot.ca/2012/11/online-tools-for-creating-engaging.html Plus I d like to ask you if
    Message 1 of 28 , Nov 19, 2012
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      Hi folks,

      I'm still curating your comments here
      http://toolkit4learning.blogspot.ca/2012/11/online-tools-for-creating-engaging.html

      Plus I'd like to ask you if any of you uses http://socrative.com This seems to be a neat little site for getting feedback on the fly via student laptops or mobile devices.

      Vance


      --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, "ElizabethA" <eanne_grenoble@...> wrote:
      >
      > The flurry of activity made me laugh because of course,everyone still needs "supplemental online activies" :-)
      > The great thing about Quizlet is that it tranfers your word lists onto the mobile app. My students think it's very cool:-)
      > I like the way the Thai group have changed the concept with their whole sentences :)
      >
      > Educaplay looks very attractive - thx
      >
      > My two cents :
      > Not so attractive, but fantastically quick to use is http://www.textivate.com/ I sometimes make additional cloze texts with it (just copy paste and select the words) although Larry Ferlanzzo seems to think that http://www.learnclick.com/ is preferable. hmmmm another one to look at :-(
      > Anyways - thx for all the suggestions
      > Amitiés
      > ElizabethA
      >
      >
      > --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, "Squires, Robert" <robert.squires@> wrote:
      > >
      > looking for a way to create supplemental online activities because they were fed up with the ones offered by the McGraw-Hill textbook that they use.
      >
    • Dr. Elizabeth Hanson-Smith
      Just slightly tangentially, I m interested in authoring tools for games (e.g., like arcade games at classtools.net or proprofs.com) that can be created in
      Message 2 of 28 , Nov 20, 2012
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        Just slightly tangentially, I'm interested in authoring tools for games (e.g., like arcade games at classtools.net or proprofs.com) that can be created in languages other than English, e.g., for Spanish native speakers who are learning English or math, but who still need the interface to be in Spanish. Spanish can be found, but how about Arabic, Russian, Chinese, and some of the less familiar languages?

        I realize there may be a culture gap, in that teachers/profs in other languages/countries may not feel that games have much value for learning. Well, come to think of it, that's true of many teachers in the U.S., too. (Learning is serious, not fun!)

        So tools for writing educational games in non-English languages that are a step beyond flashcards or matching -- anyone?

        --Elizabeth H-S


        --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, "Vance" <vancestev@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi folks,
        >
        > I'm still curating your comments here
        > http://toolkit4learning.blogspot.ca/2012/11/online-tools-for-creating-engaging.html
        >
        > Plus I'd like to ask you if any of you uses http://socrative.com This seems to be a neat little site for getting feedback on the fly via student laptops or mobile devices.
        >
        > Vance
        >
        >
        > --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, "ElizabethA" <eanne_grenoble@> wrote:
        > >
        > > The flurry of activity made me laugh because of course,everyone still needs "supplemental online activies" :-)
        > > The great thing about Quizlet is that it tranfers your word lists onto the mobile app. My students think it's very cool:-)
        > > I like the way the Thai group have changed the concept with their whole sentences :)
        > >
        > > Educaplay looks very attractive - thx
        > >
        > > My two cents :
        > > Not so attractive, but fantastically quick to use is http://www.textivate.com/ I sometimes make additional cloze texts with it (just copy paste and select the words) although Larry Ferlanzzo seems to think that http://www.learnclick.com/ is preferable. hmmmm another one to look at :-(
        > > Anyways - thx for all the suggestions
        > > Amitiés
        > > ElizabethA
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, "Squires, Robert" <robert.squires@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > looking for a way to create supplemental online activities because they were fed up with the ones offered by the McGraw-Hill textbook that they use.
        > >
        >
      • Barbara Dieu
        My young teens love the 20 questions game. http://www.20q.net/ (offered in different languages) and Akinator is loads of fun as well http://en.akinator.com/ B.
        Message 3 of 28 , Nov 20, 2012
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          My young teens love the 20 questions game.
          http://www.20q.net/ (offered in different languages)
          and Akinator is loads of fun as well
          http://en.akinator.com/

          B.

          --
          Barbara Dieu
          http://barbaradieu.com
          http://beespace.net


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Barbara Dieu
          Oh..I m sorry..neither game I mentioned is a tool for writing/creating but kids love them nevertheless. B. -- Barbara Dieu http://barbaradieu.com
          Message 4 of 28 , Nov 20, 2012
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            Oh..I'm sorry..neither game I mentioned is a tool for writing/creating but
            kids love them nevertheless.
            B.


            --
            Barbara Dieu
            http://barbaradieu.com
            http://beespace.net


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Maryanne
            Robert, Robert, In researching information on games in language learning, I found A Comparison of Computer Game and Language-Learning Task Design Using Flow
            Message 5 of 28 , Nov 26, 2012
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              Robert,
              Robert,
              In researching information on games in language learning, I found A
              Comparison of Computer Game and Language-Learning Task Design Using Flow
              Theory <http://callej.org/journal/12-1/Franciosi_2011.pdf> by Stephan
              J. Franciosi quite on target regarding supplemental material for L2.
              In his article Franciosi suggests that both serious games
              <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serious_games> and casual games
              <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casual_games> can play a role in second
              language development. He states that arcade type or flashcard games
              would work well for practicing discrete subsets of skills because they
              tend to be repetitive and require players to practice isolated or very
              small sets of skills, and come with the added benefit of a dynamic,
              computer-mediated interaction that supports flow ( p. 21). On the
              other hand, role play games, strategy games or simulations can be used
              to integrate skills in holistic problem-solving activities... ( p. 15)
              What the Spanish professors seemed to be looking for were casual games
              templates that they could use to create additional practice for discrete
              subsets of skills, but they might also consider looking for "serious" or
              "strategy games" to use as motivational supplemental activities. For
              strategy games they could look at Big Fish Games
              <http://www.bigfishgames.com/online-games/index.html> . I believe you
              have 1 hour of free play, but some games require a download). You
              click the word English in the upper right-hand corner for a drop down
              menu of languages available and then click strategy games. Third World
              Farmer in Spanish <http://p-3rd-world-farmer.bajar.toggle.com/> is also
              an option. A good blog with ideas for using games for L2 is Kyle
              Mawer's Digital Play <http://www.digitalplay.info/blog/> . He offers
              practical ideas for having students work alone or collaboratively to
              create "walk-throughs" for games. Personally, I have been looking for
              more good strategy games in Spanish, French or other languages. If
              anyone knows of any, please share. :-)
              Maryanne








              --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, "Squires, Robert"
              <robert.squires@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi all,
              >
              > I had a visit from a couple of professors in our Spanish department on
              Friday, who were looking for a way to create supplemental online
              activities because they were fed up with the ones offered by the
              McGraw-Hill textbook that they use. We discussed some options for the
              creation of online activities, but these weren't completely satisfying:
              quia, hot potatoes, etc. Are there some newer authoring tools that allow
              for more complex activity development. The kinds of activities were fill
              in the blank with the correct tense, re-write the sentence, re-organize
              the sentence, etc. (Not generally my favorite, but still a staple of
              foreign/second language teaching on our campus it seems). Have any of
              you setup a website/wiki/blog with supplemental activities like this
              that I could perhaps point them to? Thinking in more general terms, what
              tools are you using to provide textbook reinforcing activities for your
              students?
              >
              > Thanks for considering,
              >
              > Robert
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Squires, Robert
              Thanks Maryanne, That s very helpful. Vance is doing a great job of pulling these resources together for further exploration. One area that there is some
              Message 6 of 28 , Nov 26, 2012
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                Thanks Maryanne,

                That's very helpful. Vance is doing a great job of pulling these resources together for further exploration. One area that there is some interest in is developing an app or interactive ibook, which might serve a more strategic need. Ibook's, in spite of their seemingly simple interface, are not that easy to work with. (They were created in order to convert an existing book into an iBook, so unless you have all of your content clearly laid out before you begin, you quickly run into organizational difficulties. Interactive media is also difficult to make work-and, of course, the books only work on Apple devices). A more promising approach is the use of Corona SDK to develop a cross-platform e-book application: http://www.coronalabs.com/i-want-to-build/ebooks-comics/ . There's some additional plugins that allow you to work directly in Adobe Creative Suite to create your images, animations, and you can preview the whole book on various devices as you progress. It's still a fair amount of work, but at least you get a product of maximum value.

                Robert

                From: evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com [mailto:evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Maryanne
                Sent: Monday, November 26, 2012 7:24 AM
                To: evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [evonline2002_webheads] Re: Authoring tools for supplementary language activities



                Robert,
                Robert,
                In researching information on games in language learning, I found A
                Comparison of Computer Game and Language-Learning Task Design Using Flow
                Theory <http://callej.org/journal/12-1/Franciosi_2011.pdf> by Stephan
                J. Franciosi quite on target regarding supplemental material for L2.
                In his article Franciosi suggests that both serious games
                <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serious_games> and casual games
                <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casual_games> can play a role in second
                language development. He states that arcade type or flashcard games
                would work well for practicing discrete subsets of skills because they
                tend to be repetitive and require players to practice isolated or very
                small sets of skills, and come with the added benefit of a dynamic,
                computer-mediated interaction that supports flow ( p. 21). On the
                other hand, role play games, strategy games or simulations can be used
                to integrate skills in holistic problem-solving activities... ( p. 15)
                What the Spanish professors seemed to be looking for were casual games
                templates that they could use to create additional practice for discrete
                subsets of skills, but they might also consider looking for "serious" or
                "strategy games" to use as motivational supplemental activities. For
                strategy games they could look at Big Fish Games
                <http://www.bigfishgames.com/online-games/index.html> . I believe you
                have 1 hour of free play, but some games require a download). You
                click the word English in the upper right-hand corner for a drop down
                menu of languages available and then click strategy games. Third World
                Farmer in Spanish <http://p-3rd-world-farmer.bajar.toggle.com/> is also
                an option. A good blog with ideas for using games for L2 is Kyle
                Mawer's Digital Play <http://www.digitalplay.info/blog/> . He offers
                practical ideas for having students work alone or collaboratively to
                create "walk-throughs" for games. Personally, I have been looking for
                more good strategy games in Spanish, French or other languages. If
                anyone knows of any, please share. :-)
                Maryanne

                --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com<mailto:evonline2002_webheads%40yahoogroups.com>, "Squires, Robert"
                <robert.squires@...<mailto:robert.squires@...>> wrote:
                >
                > Hi all,
                >
                > I had a visit from a couple of professors in our Spanish department on
                Friday, who were looking for a way to create supplemental online
                activities because they were fed up with the ones offered by the
                McGraw-Hill textbook that they use. We discussed some options for the
                creation of online activities, but these weren't completely satisfying:
                quia, hot potatoes, etc. Are there some newer authoring tools that allow
                for more complex activity development. The kinds of activities were fill
                in the blank with the correct tense, re-write the sentence, re-organize
                the sentence, etc. (Not generally my favorite, but still a staple of
                foreign/second language teaching on our campus it seems). Have any of
                you setup a website/wiki/blog with supplemental activities like this
                that I could perhaps point them to? Thinking in more general terms, what
                tools are you using to provide textbook reinforcing activities for your
                students?
                >
                > Thanks for considering,
                >
                > Robert
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • morteza barin
                Dear Robert,I m Morteza Barin one of the webheadsinaction members need some info about multi-media lessons for creating e lessons for mobile phones.I ll be
                Message 7 of 28 , Nov 26, 2012
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                  Dear Robert,I'm Morteza Barin one of the webheadsinaction members need some info about multi-media lessons for creating e lessons for mobile phones.I'll be very happy if you and others members to help me to find more info about it.All the best.Morteza Barin






















                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Maria Rosario Di Mónaco
                  Hi Morteza, This is what I ve found in my Diigo library: http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/are-you-ready-mobile-learning
                  Message 8 of 28 , Nov 26, 2012
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                    Hi Morteza,

                    This is what I've found in my Diigo library:
                    http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/are-you-ready-mobile-learning
                    http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/blogs/rob-lewis/ten-ideas-mobile-learning
                    http://mobilestudy.org/home/

                    I also suggest you look at the thread "Authoring tools for supplementary
                    language activities" in this group. There are loads of great ideas there.
                    Not sure about this, but I think some of them might lend themselves to
                    mobile learning.

                    Best,
                    Mary

                    On Mon, Nov 26, 2012 at 1:34 PM, morteza barin <mbarin623@...> wrote:

                    > **
                    >
                    >
                    > Dear Robert,I'm Morteza Barin one of the webheadsinaction members need
                    > some info about multi-media lessons for creating e lessons for mobile
                    > phones.I'll be very happy if you and others members to help me to find more
                    > info about it.All the best.Morteza Barin
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Maryanne
                    Hi Robert, Thanks for the information on creating e-books, but I am more interested in online strategy games for language learning, particularly in foreign
                    Message 9 of 28 , Nov 26, 2012
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Hi Robert,
                      Thanks for the information on creating e-books, but I am more interested
                      in online strategy games for language learning, particularly in foreign
                      languages. There are very few if any strategy/serious games made
                      specifically for language learning due to the complexities involved as
                      outlined in 10 Key Principles for Designing Video Games for Foreign
                      Language Learning
                      <http://lingualgames.wordpress.com/article/10-key-principles-for-designi\
                      ng-video-27mkxqba7b13d-2/> , but some strategy games made simply for
                      entertainment and available in languages other than English can be used
                      as supplemental material for L2 learning. Those are the types of games
                      I am looking for. Any help would be appreciated.
                      Maryanne

                      --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, "Squires, Robert"
                      <robert.squires@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Thanks Maryanne,
                      >
                      > That's very helpful. Vance is doing a great job of pulling these
                      resources together for further exploration. One area that there is some
                      interest in is developing an app or interactive ibook, which might serve
                      a more strategic need. Ibook's, in spite of their seemingly simple
                      interface, are not that easy to work with. (They were created in order
                      to convert an existing book into an iBook, so unless you have all of
                      your content clearly laid out before you begin, you quickly run into
                      organizational difficulties. Interactive media is also difficult to make
                      work-and, of course, the books only work on Apple devices). A more
                      promising approach is the use of Corona SDK to develop a cross-platform
                      e-book application:
                      http://www.coronalabs.com/i-want-to-build/ebooks-comics/ . There's some
                      additional plugins that allow you to work directly in Adobe Creative
                      Suite to create your images, animations, and you can preview the whole
                      book on various devices as you progress. It's still a fair amount of
                      work, but at least you get a product of maximum value.
                      >
                      > Robert
                      >
                      > From: evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com
                      [mailto:evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Maryanne
                      > Sent: Monday, November 26, 2012 7:24 AM
                      > To: evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: [evonline2002_webheads] Re: Authoring tools for supplementary
                      language activities
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Robert,
                      > Robert,
                      > In researching information on games in language learning, I found A
                      > Comparison of Computer Game and Language-Learning Task Design Using
                      Flow
                      > Theory <http://callej.org/journal/12-1/Franciosi_2011.pdf> by Stephan
                      > J. Franciosi quite on target regarding supplemental material for L2.
                      > In his article Franciosi suggests that both serious games
                      > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serious_games> and casual games
                      > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casual_games> can play a role in second
                      > language development. He states that arcade type or flashcard games
                      > would work well for practicing discrete subsets of skills because they
                      > tend to be repetitive and require players to practice isolated or very
                      > small sets of skills, and come with the added benefit of a dynamic,
                      > computer-mediated interaction that supports flow ( p. 21). On the
                      > other hand, role play games, strategy games or simulations can be used
                      > to integrate skills in holistic problem-solving activities... ( p. 15)
                      > What the Spanish professors seemed to be looking for were casual games
                      > templates that they could use to create additional practice for
                      discrete
                      > subsets of skills, but they might also consider looking for "serious"
                      or
                      > "strategy games" to use as motivational supplemental activities. For
                      > strategy games they could look at Big Fish Games
                      > <http://www.bigfishgames.com/online-games/index.html> . I believe you
                      > have 1 hour of free play, but some games require a download). You
                      > click the word English in the upper right-hand corner for a drop down
                      > menu of languages available and then click strategy games. Third World
                      > Farmer in Spanish <http://p-3rd-world-farmer.bajar.toggle.com/> is
                      also
                      > an option. A good blog with ideas for using games for L2 is Kyle
                      > Mawer's Digital Play <http://www.digitalplay.info/blog/> . He offers
                      > practical ideas for having students work alone or collaboratively to
                      > create "walk-throughs" for games. Personally, I have been looking for
                      > more good strategy games in Spanish, French or other languages. If
                      > anyone knows of any, please share. :-)
                      > Maryanne




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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