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Your feedback sought: ESL-oriented video film review (Pirates of the Caribbean

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  • not_ants
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6wgacoTJ3E I made this clip after watching a video film review with my students and realizing that watching the trailer while
    Message 1 of 5 , May 19, 2011
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      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6wgacoTJ3E

      I made this clip after watching a video film review with my students and realizing that watching the trailer while listening to the reviewer is much more engaging to the student than just hearing or reading the review.  I "ESL-ified"  the review by speaking slowly, using simple vocabulary, and glossing words and expressions both orally and using Youtube's annotation feature (which can be turned on or off).  Exercises, discussion questions could easily be added.
      The technique I used is as follows:
      1. Go to http://www.hd-trailers.net to download a trailer (I was unable to download this POC clip using the more common Youtube download methods -- perhaps there was some kind of block on commercial movie trailers)
      2. Convert the downloaded trailer to .avi (if it's .flv or .mov, etc.).   Use http://www.Pazeera-software.com tools or find your own  free 'something to .avi converter' online.
      3. Load the .avi file into Moviemaker version 2.6  (available at http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=d6ba5972-328e-4df7-8f9d-068fc0f80cfc%c2%a0  )
      4. Click Tools/Narrate Timeline to add your spoken commentary on the voice track (over the video sound track). Prepare some notes so it flows better.
      5. Click Tools/Audio Levels to make the movie soundtrack softer than your voice. This is key!
      6. Save the movie as .avi (Save to my computer)
      7. Upload to Youtube (you'll need a Youtube account - free)
      8. In Youtube add annotations as desired (see Youtube help for how to do this.. it's not hard)
      9. Get the link and post it on Facebook, Twitter, here, etc.

















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Study
      How-To Update on making video-based film reviews for ESL students Students have reported that the movie soundtrack is too loud and my voice too soft and too
      Message 2 of 5 , May 21, 2011
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        How-To Update on making video-based film reviews for ESL students

        Students have reported that the movie soundtrack is too loud and my voice too soft and too many 'umms' so I tweaked the review of Pirates of the Caribbean (at http://www.youtube.com/studycom) as follows:

        -Converted the .wma audio file to .mp3 using wma mp3 Free Converter from http://www.koyotesoft.com

        -Imported the resulting .mp3 into Audacity

        -Used Audacity's Noise Removal tool to get rid of background hiss

        -Inserted silence where there were 'umms' and 'ahs'

        -Boosted the bass for a more mellifluous sound

        -Increased the volume

        -THEN using the wma mp3 tool from Koyotesoft I reconverted the tweaked sound file to .wma and saved it to the Moviemaker 2.6 default directory (in my case it's MyVideos/Narration)

        -Opened Moviemaker 2.6 (remember: not the new version! 2.6 only!) with the previous version of the review already loaded, cut the audio track and replaced it with the new one, saved the movie, uploaded to Youtube and redid the annotations.



        --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, not_ants <not_ants@...> wrote:
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6wgacoTJ3E
        >
        > I made this clip after watching a video film review with my students and realizing that watching the trailer while listening to the reviewer is much more engaging to the student than just hearing or reading the review.  I "ESL-ified"  the review by speaking slowly, using simple vocabulary, and glossing words and expressions both orally and using Youtube's annotation feature (which can be turned on or off).  Exercises, discussion questions could easily be added.
        > The technique I used is as follows:
        > 1. Go to http://www.hd-trailers.net to download a trailer (I was unable to download this POC clip using the more common Youtube download methods -- perhaps there was some kind of block on commercial movie trailers)
        > 2. Convert the downloaded trailer to .avi (if it's .flv or .mov, etc.).   Use http://www.Pazeera-software.com tools or find your own  free 'something to .avi converter' online.
        > 3. Load the .avi file into Moviemaker version 2.6  (available at http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=d6ba5972-328e-4df7-8f9d-068fc0f80cfc%c2%a0  )
        > 4. Click Tools/Narrate Timeline to add your spoken commentary on the voice track (over the video sound track). Prepare some notes so it flows better.
        > 5. Click Tools/Audio Levels to make the movie soundtrack softer than your voice. This is key!
        > 6. Save the movie as .avi (Save to my computer)
        > 7. Upload to Youtube (you'll need a Youtube account - free)
        > 8. In Youtube add annotations as desired (see Youtube help for how to do this.. it's not hard)
        > 9. Get the link and post it on Facebook, Twitter, here, etc.
        >
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        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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      • Vance Stevens
        Dave, this looks brilliant I wonder if you d be willing to come online one Sunday morning (your time) and tell us more about it / discuss it with us / walk us
        Message 3 of 5 , May 25, 2011
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          Dave, this looks brilliant

          I wonder if you'd be willing to come online one Sunday morning (your time)
          and tell us more about it / discuss it with us / walk us through it (and
          we'll record your presentation) ...

          You can see our cfp here: http://learning2gether.pbworks.com/cfp

          and you (or anybody) can join the wiki and pencil in your date, time, and
          presentation details here:
          http://learning2gether.pbworks.com/volunteersneeded

          Hope you can join us one Sunday, or on another day if need be,

          Vance


          On Sat, May 21, 2011 at 6:19 PM, Study <dwinet@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          > How-To Update on making video-based film reviews for ESL students
          >
          > Students have reported that the movie soundtrack is too loud and my voice
          > too soft and too many 'umms' so I tweaked the review of Pirates of the
          > Caribbean (at http://www.youtube.com/studycom) as follows:
          >
          > -Converted the .wma audio file to .mp3 using wma mp3 Free Converter from
          > http://www.koyotesoft.com
          >
          > -Imported the resulting .mp3 into Audacity
          >
          > -Used Audacity's Noise Removal tool to get rid of background hiss
          >
          > -Inserted silence where there were 'umms' and 'ahs'
          >
          > -Boosted the bass for a more mellifluous sound
          >
          > -Increased the volume
          >
          > -THEN using the wma mp3 tool from Koyotesoft I reconverted the tweaked
          > sound file to .wma and saved it to the Moviemaker 2.6 default directory (in
          > my case it's MyVideos/Narration)
          >
          > -Opened Moviemaker 2.6 (remember: not the new version! 2.6 only!) with the
          > previous version of the review already loaded, cut the audio track and
          > replaced it with the new one, saved the movie, uploaded to Youtube and redid
          > the annotations.
          >
          >
          > --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, not_ants <not_ants@...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6wgacoTJ3E
          > >
          > > I made this clip after watching a video film review with my students and
          > realizing that watching the trailer while listening to the reviewer is much
          > more engaging to the student than just hearing or reading the review. I
          > "ESL-ified" the review by speaking slowly, using simple vocabulary, and
          > glossing words and expressions both orally and using Youtube's annotation
          > feature (which can be turned on or off). Exercises, discussion questions
          > could easily be added.
          > > The technique I used is as follows:
          > > 1. Go to http://www.hd-trailers.net to download a trailer (I was unable
          > to download this POC clip using the more common Youtube download methods --
          > perhaps there was some kind of block on commercial movie trailers)
          > > 2. Convert the downloaded trailer to .avi (if it's .flv or .mov, etc.).
          > Use http://www.Pazeera-software.com tools or find your own free
          > 'something to .avi converter' online.
          > > 3. Load the .avi file into Moviemaker version 2.6 (available at
          > http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=d6ba5972-328e-4df7-8f9d-068fc0f80cfc
          > )
          > > 4. Click Tools/Narrate Timeline to add your spoken commentary on the
          > voice track (over the video sound track). Prepare some notes so it flows
          > better.
          > > 5. Click Tools/Audio Levels to make the movie soundtrack softer than your
          > voice. This is key!
          > > 6. Save the movie as .avi (Save to my computer)
          > > 7. Upload to Youtube (you'll need a Youtube account - free)
          > > 8. In Youtube add annotations as desired (see Youtube help for how to do
          > this.. it's not hard)
          > > 9. Get the link and post it on Facebook, Twitter, here, etc.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
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          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
          >
          >



          --
          Vance Stevens
          http://adVancEducation.blogspot.com
          http://vancesdiveblogs.blogspot.com


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Dr. Elizabeth Hanson-Smith
          Hi David-- I was really interested in the annotated video you made, but it had been removed when I clicked to go. Is this because the trailer was
          Message 4 of 5 , May 25, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi David--
            I was really interested in the annotated video you made, but it had been removed when I clicked to go. Is this because the trailer was copyright-protected or something?

            Anyway, I'd like to do the same thing on my Mac and make up a lesson plan for teachers on my Website--with kudos to you and Study.com, of course.

            Have you re-mounted the video?
            --Elizabeth HS


            --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, not_ants <not_ants@...> wrote:
            >
            > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6wgacoTJ3E
            >
            > I made this clip after watching a video film review with my students and realizing that watching the trailer while listening to the reviewer is much more engaging to the student than just hearing or reading the review.  I "ESL-ified"  the review by speaking slowly, using simple vocabulary, and glossing words and expressions both orally and using Youtube's annotation feature (which can be turned on or off).  Exercises, discussion questions could easily be added.
            > The technique I used is as follows:
            > 1. Go to http://www.hd-trailers.net to download a trailer (I was unable to download this POC clip using the more common Youtube download methods -- perhaps there was some kind of block on commercial movie trailers)
            > 2. Convert the downloaded trailer to .avi (if it's .flv or .mov, etc.).   Use http://www.Pazeera-software.com tools or find your own  free 'something to .avi converter' online.
            > 3. Load the .avi file into Moviemaker version 2.6  (available at http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=d6ba5972-328e-4df7-8f9d-068fc0f80cfc%c2%a0  )
            > 4. Click Tools/Narrate Timeline to add your spoken commentary on the voice track (over the video sound track). Prepare some notes so it flows better.
            > 5. Click Tools/Audio Levels to make the movie soundtrack softer than your voice. This is key!
            > 6. Save the movie as .avi (Save to my computer)
            > 7. Upload to Youtube (you'll need a Youtube account - free)
            > 8. In Youtube add annotations as desired (see Youtube help for how to do this.. it's not hard)
            > 9. Get the link and post it on Facebook, Twitter, here, etc.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Study
            Thank you Vance. The video is still up on Youtube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5AlaDEuHjx8. They made a little noise about how it might be infringing
            Message 5 of 5 , May 28, 2011
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              Thank you Vance. The video is still up on Youtube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5AlaDEuHjx8. They made a little noise about how it might be infringing on copyright but haven't yanked it. I figure it's covered under educational exceptions anyway.

              I'd love to present my how-to on a Sunday if it's not during my teaching time (i.e. GMT 17:00-18:00) -- What time and where do you guys meet? I'm partial to www.twiddla.com at the moment but open to other venues of course. I think before I present I should try to put together a how-to video that would clarify things, as there are lots of steps unfortunately to this particular endeavor.

              Hope you and all Webheads are well and flourishing.

              Let's talk about mobile learning one of these days... I'm trying to get my head around it.

              --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, Vance Stevens <vancestev@...> wrote:
              >
              > Dave, this looks brilliant
              >
              > I wonder if you'd be willing to come online one Sunday morning (your time)
              > and tell us more about it / discuss it with us / walk us through it (and
              > we'll record your presentation) ...
              >
              > You can see our cfp here: http://learning2gether.pbworks.com/cfp
              >
              > and you (or anybody) can join the wiki and pencil in your date, time, and
              > presentation details here:
              > http://learning2gether.pbworks.com/volunteersneeded
              >
              > Hope you can join us one Sunday, or on another day if need be,
              >
              > Vance
              >
              >
              > On Sat, May 21, 2011 at 6:19 PM, Study <dwinet@...> wrote:
              >
              > >
              > >
              > > How-To Update on making video-based film reviews for ESL students
              > >
              > > Students have reported that the movie soundtrack is too loud and my voice
              > > too soft and too many 'umms' so I tweaked the review of Pirates of the
              > > Caribbean (at http://www.youtube.com/studycom) as follows:
              > >
              > > -Converted the .wma audio file to .mp3 using wma mp3 Free Converter from
              > > http://www.koyotesoft.com
              > >
              > > -Imported the resulting .mp3 into Audacity
              > >
              > > -Used Audacity's Noise Removal tool to get rid of background hiss
              > >
              > > -Inserted silence where there were 'umms' and 'ahs'
              > >
              > > -Boosted the bass for a more mellifluous sound
              > >
              > > -Increased the volume
              > >
              > > -THEN using the wma mp3 tool from Koyotesoft I reconverted the tweaked
              > > sound file to .wma and saved it to the Moviemaker 2.6 default directory (in
              > > my case it's MyVideos/Narration)
              > >
              > > -Opened Moviemaker 2.6 (remember: not the new version! 2.6 only!) with the
              > > previous version of the review already loaded, cut the audio track and
              > > replaced it with the new one, saved the movie, uploaded to Youtube and redid
              > > the annotations.
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, not_ants <not_ants@>
              > > wrote:
              > > >
              > > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6wgacoTJ3E
              > > >
              > > > I made this clip after watching a video film review with my students and
              > > realizing that watching the trailer while listening to the reviewer is much
              > > more engaging to the student than just hearing or reading the review. I
              > > "ESL-ified" the review by speaking slowly, using simple vocabulary, and
              > > glossing words and expressions both orally and using Youtube's annotation
              > > feature (which can be turned on or off). Exercises, discussion questions
              > > could easily be added.
              > > > The technique I used is as follows:
              > > > 1. Go to http://www.hd-trailers.net to download a trailer (I was unable
              > > to download this POC clip using the more common Youtube download methods --
              > > perhaps there was some kind of block on commercial movie trailers)
              > > > 2. Convert the downloaded trailer to .avi (if it's .flv or .mov, etc.).
              > > Use http://www.Pazeera-software.com tools or find your own free
              > > 'something to .avi converter' online.
              > > > 3. Load the .avi file into Moviemaker version 2.6 (available at
              > > http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=d6ba5972-328e-4df7-8f9d-068fc0f80cfc
              > > )
              > > > 4. Click Tools/Narrate Timeline to add your spoken commentary on the
              > > voice track (over the video sound track). Prepare some notes so it flows
              > > better.
              > > > 5. Click Tools/Audio Levels to make the movie soundtrack softer than your
              > > voice. This is key!
              > > > 6. Save the movie as .avi (Save to my computer)
              > > > 7. Upload to Youtube (you'll need a Youtube account - free)
              > > > 8. In Youtube add annotations as desired (see Youtube help for how to do
              > > this.. it's not hard)
              > > > 9. Get the link and post it on Facebook, Twitter, here, etc.
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              > --
              > Vance Stevens
              > http://adVancEducation.blogspot.com
              > http://vancesdiveblogs.blogspot.com
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
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