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great article in the NYT today

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  • Teresa Almeida d'Eca
    Dear friends, Here s an article really worth reading. I relate to it totally. The High Cost of Low Teacher Salaries http://nyti.ms/mfbg5e I believe that this
    Message 1 of 3 , May 1, 2011
      Dear friends,

      Here's an article really worth reading. I relate to it totally.
      The High Cost of Low Teacher Salaries
      http://nyti.ms/mfbg5e

      I believe that this perspective would make all the difference, namely, recruiting the best, "the top graduates to the profession". But others referred, such training, trust, "support, not punishment", pay, are also extremely relevant.

      Enjoy your Sunday!

      Hugs, Teresa

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • dk
      I m not sure everyone would agree with that evaluation that low pay for teachers is the main problem. First of all, there is a problem with the author s
      Message 2 of 3 , May 1, 2011
        I'm not sure everyone would agree with that evaluation that low pay for
        teachers is the main problem.

        First of all, there is a problem with the author's comparison of soldiers to
        teachers. He says we don't blame soldiers, we support them, but we do blame
        teachers. I think the soldier's task is more clear cut. "Take that hill!"
        "Capture that position!" I mean, what if the soldiers' task was: "Win the
        war!" I'm sure if the war wasn't "won" we'd find some reason to blame them.

        Whereas in many cases, teachers' tasks are more nebulous. They are left to
        their own devices and, until recently, without required measurable outcomes.


        Teachers have a powerful union and we can't say that the union has always
        acted in the best interest of students. What if soldiers had a powerful
        union like teachers did?

        An Associated Press article says:

        "The gap between the highest performing countries and the United States is
        stark - students in Shanghai, for example, had an average score of 556
        points in reading, 56 points higher than the 500-point average reached by
        United States students. Shanghai students also posted the highest score in
        math, with an average of 600 points, 113 points higher than the U.S.
        average."

        Why did the authors of the NY Times article not suggest studying how
        Shanghai teachers do it? Are Shanghai teachers so highly paid?

        The Associated Press article continues:

        "The United States spends more per student, on average, than other
        countries. In the 2009 PISA study, only Luxembourg spent more. The report
        notes that countries like Estonia and Poland perform at about the same level
        as the United States, while spending less than half the amount per student."

        And today we are watching and, especially WebHeads, are participating in,
        the commoditization of education. As Bill Gates said, the best education
        will be on the Net by 2015.

        What is the trend? The trend is not going in the direction of more personal
        feely touchy attention from teachers, more one-on-one, smaller class sizes,
        etc. I know we all have passionate feelings about the importance of the
        personal touch from the teacher. But WebHeads are working towards a more
        technological touch to teaching. The tools developed and explored by
        WebHeads allow more distant teaching. They allow mass teaching.

        Admittedly, in the best form this is a sort of "mass customization" which is
        better than the "education factory" approach. It can allow for
        "differentiated instruction" which may be more useful than the traditional
        classroom model.

        I don't see any government in the world saying, "Oh yeah, we need to pay
        teachers more money. Let's jack up their salaries." The fact is, good or
        bad, things are not going in that direction.

        Dave Kees
        GUANGZHOU, CHINA

        Email - DAVEKEES@...
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        Blog - http://davekees.wordpress.com/

        TEFL TEACHERS
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      • glenngo@aol.com
        Dear Tersa, I read the two articles in the NYT, and they are true and relevant. David [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 3 , May 3, 2011
          Dear Tersa, I read the two articles in the NYT, and they are true and
          relevant. David

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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