Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Growing up Digital - Wired for Distraction

Expand Messages
  • John Hibbs
    For all Webheads, and my favorite teacher in the North Island of N.Z., required reading: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/21/technology/21brain.html A long read.
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 22, 2010
      For all Webheads, and my favorite teacher in the North Island of
      N.Z., required reading:

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/21/technology/21brain.html

      A long read. But as good as it gets. I promise.
      John Hibbs
      www.bfranklin.edu/johnhibbs
    • dk
      This article, currently the most Emailed article at the New York Times, is very disturbing. In the first three sentences we can see the problem: REDWOOD CITY,
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 25, 2010
        This article, currently the most Emailed article at the New York Times, is
        very disturbing. In the first three sentences we can see the problem:

        "REDWOOD CITY, Calif. - On the eve of a pivotal academic year in Vishal
        Singh's life, he faces a stark choice on his bedroom desk: book or computer?
        By all rights, Vishal, a bright 17-year-old, should already have finished
        the book, Kurt Vonnegut's 'Cat's Cradle', his summer reading assignment. But
        he has managed 43 pages in two months."

        It is disturbing for two different and opposite reasons. What is the problem
        here? Multiple choice, choose one:

        A. Vishal is so computer addicted that he cannot get his homework done.

        B. Vishal's teacher asked him to read "Cat's Cradle".

        If your answer is "A", congratulations, that is the "correct" answer and the
        answer that all civilized people would give. But some of us answer "B".

        I read the whole article and watched the video report a couple days ago. The
        article is quite balanced in featuring this boy who is obsessed using his
        computer on a film project using some very advanced software that he taught
        himself to use but is getting very low scores in school.

        I never read Kurt Vonnegut's "Cat's Cradle" before although a couple years
        ago I tried to read "Slaughterhouse Five" and just couldn't get into it. If
        a teacher's job is to stimulate the mind of the student to spark and equip
        his creative ingenuity to face the unknown challenges and opportunities of
        the future then I don't think forcing this kind of literature on him is the
        way to do it. If the teacher's job is to drive, force, whip the student into
        mindless submission to prepare them to be driven, forced and whipped by a
        Dilbert-iquese type boss in a mindless job then this is a great way to do it
        and this is very disturbing.

        The principal, David Reilly, is pretty cool. He said he is not worried about
        Vishal because Vishal is pursuing his dream of being a filmmaker. The
        principal is "a former musician who says he sympathizes when young people
        feel disenfranchised, is determined to engage these 21st-century students.
        He has asked teachers to build Web sites to communicate with students,
        introduced popular classes on using digital tools to record music, secured
        funding for iPads to teach Mandarin and obtained $3 million in grants for a
        multimedia center."

        In short, I think the principal would be a good candidate for Webhead
        membership. Let's hope the teacher pushing "Cat's Cradle" can catch on.

        Dave Kees


        LEGAL DISCLAIMER: This message represents the official view of the voices in
        my head.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.