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Re: [evonline2002_webheads] Re: Workshop for EFL Teachers at University of Khartoum

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  • Hala Fawzi
    Dear Vida, I am glad you like the wiki. Thank you for refering me to the dead link. Resolved!Cheers, Hala   ... [Non-text portions of this message have been
    Message 1 of 15 , Sep 1, 2009
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      Dear Vida,
      I am glad you like the wiki. Thank you for refering me to the dead link. Resolved!Cheers,
      Hala  


      > http://uofkworkshop .pbworks. com/

      >



































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    • Hala Fawzi
      Dearest Susan, I am glad you liked the wiki. Please feel free to use ALL what s found on the wiki.I digged, compiled, googled, put three Youtube videos,
      Message 2 of 15 , Sep 1, 2009
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        Dearest Susan,
        I am glad you liked the wiki. Please feel free to use ALL what's found on the wiki.I digged, compiled, googled, put three Youtube videos, applied to our context in Sudan on the PPP, added webheads' flavor to the workshop and voila!
        Thanks again, Susan.A huge hug from Khartoum( watch out the mud on my hands! Raining heavily now!)
        HalaP.S. I am having trouble uploading my three ppp to Slideshare. I am not sure if anyone else is having the same problem.














         

































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      • Vance Stevens
        Hi Hala, I m perusing your materials now. I ve just written an introduction to social networking for our students and my teaching colleagues here at Petroleum
        Message 3 of 15 , Sep 2, 2009
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          Hi Hala,

          I'm perusing your materials now. I've just written an introduction to
          social networking for our students and my teaching colleagues here at
          Petroleum Institute and I'm amazed yet not all that surprised actually at
          how our teaching points intersect. I am planning to put my materials online
          shortly. But I'm still struggling with that one last lesson, as I explain
          here:
          http://advanceducation.blogspot.com/2009/08/social-networking-for-students-and.html

          Interestingly I published this post on Aug 27. Then on Sept 1 Russell
          Stanard wrote in Times Higher Education exactly what I was getting at in
          that last lesson. Who was it that said that Blogs are always works in
          progress since you can go back and edit them any time? I think it's so cool
          that I can write something on the 27th and come across something published
          on the 1st and improve your original "publication" based on emerging
          information.

          These technologies are so exciting yet so difficult to get across not only
          to students but especially to one's colleagues. That's the real choke
          point, but when approached correctly, not condescendingly but in a spirit of
          assistance, and when they are ready, colleagues might just come around. How
          do we improve our world? One person at a time.

          It's a real challenge to write materials that are approachable to both these
          cohorts, teachers and students (where is my mind today? Who just completed a
          survey asking 10,000 teens why they were turned off to Twitter?).

          I've turned a corner on my own personal work situation just by having been
          given the opportunity to articulate some of these concepts in curriculum.
          Initial feedback from colleagues is positive, one told me he learned a lot
          from my materials. With that attitude he's in an excellent position to
          convey his new enthusiasm to students. However, my materials have students
          and colleague examine social networking as observers, a step short of doing
          it. Will it take?? Recidivism is a big problem with weekend converts to new
          technologies. It will be interesting to see if Hala's workshops actually
          bring about a change in people's teaching in Sudan.

          Meanwhile, I'll be referring my colleagues to Hala's workshop for additional
          information since our topics intertwine so well:
          http://uofkworkshop.pbworks.com/

          Good work Hala! And I can't wait to share my materials with everyone

          Vance

          ps: email cc'd to my posterous account
          http://vancestevens.posterous.com/





          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Hala Fawzi" <haloolahakema@...>
          To: <evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, September 01, 2009 12:31 PM
          Subject: Re: [evonline2002_webheads] Workshop for EFL Teachers at University
          of Khartoum



          Dear Teresinha,
          Thank you for the congrats and the nice words about the wiki.
          Also, I would like to thank all of you, wonderful webheads who dropped some
          lines to the chat area on the homepage of the wiki.
          You are right in writing that" we are unique. And I keep having new motives
          to continue to be very proud to be a Webhead in Action". Me too!

          Tight hugs and lots of beijinhos.Hala

          > http://uofkworkshop .pbworks. com/

          >

          >


























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        • haloolahakema@yahoo.com
          Vance,   On the workshop evaluation, most of the answers to a question about the pace of the workshop, were (too fast). Others commented that a one day
          Message 4 of 15 , Sep 2, 2009
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            Vance,
             
            On the workshop evaluation, most of the answers to a question about the pace of the workshop, were (too fast). Others commented that a one day workshop about Google app. (Googling by the Nile:-) will be great, while others asked for more readings about the benefits of using social networking with students, esp. in Sudan.
             
             The impact of playing the YouTube  videos ( the book+ did you know) at the beginning of the day (day1 +day 2) was fantastic. It generated a rich discussion, especially when they applied the content to our context. It was definitely a good choice! The PPP also had a good impact. Most of the teachers admitted that it was their first time to have seen a PPP in a different style from the bullet style ( you know, they meant photos from flickr (now blocked in Sudan!!!!) cartoons, Google images, etc.). I still have problems in uploading them to Slideshare:-(
             
             
            Hala Salih says that she is glad to see her staff now talking about blogs and wikis after the workshop.
             
            So, how would I have done all the above without technology?
             
            Let me assure you that I will share with you the impact of this workshop on the teachers' teaching, hopefully, soon!
             
            Looking forward to your material.
             
            Hala
             





            http://advanceducat ion.blogspot. com/2009/ 08/social- networking- for-students- and.html




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          • Gary Harwell
            While having a workshop anywhere is good, it would have been better if you had included a session about Darfur and teaching English during a famine and
            Message 5 of 15 , Sep 3, 2009
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              While having a workshop anywhere is good, it would have been better if you had included a session about Darfur and teaching English during a famine and extermination of one group by another and how the rest of the world doesn't really give a squat.

              Gary Harwell
              www.teachergary.wikispaces.com


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            • Hala Fawzi
              I believe we don’t discuss politics and religion here, especially when it comes to the power of governments over people. Btw, one of the participants in the
              Message 6 of 15 , Sep 3, 2009
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                I believe we don’t discuss politics and religion here, especially when it comes to the power of governments over people.
                Btw, one of the participants in the workshop about Web 2.0 for TPD, who happened to be an English language teacher in University of Khartoum, is doing his PhD on the impact of learning English on sustaining peace and promoting development in war areas in Sudan.
                Because you seem interested, and I don’t want to copy-paste a long blog post on this list, you may kindly view what an English language teacher in Sudan does, a part from conducting workshops for using technology for TPD:
                http://englishonlinects.blogspot.com/search/label/Darfur
                As Sudanese citizens, we don’t include a session in a workshop about Darfur or Southern Sudan, simply, because we live with the issue; discuss our hopes and concerns for our country’s future 24/7. If you mean as English language teachers, we believe our role is to teach a language to practitioners and decision makers to  improve the skills necessary to manage conflict in all its phases,  with one objective in mind: to help in promoting peace and development.
                Btw, during a famine or extermination of a group, we, Sudanese, don’t speak English. We are more concerned about searching for funds, looking for ways to resolve the conflict and distributing food. Those who speak English with the IOs, NGO’s and organizations who distribute food are already excellent in English.
                Who says the international community “didn’t give a squat “? Check reports of the UNAMID, African Union, International Criminal Court, etc.
                Thank you for your concern about Darfur.
                Nice wiki you have, teacher Gary.  The correct URL is: http://teachergary.wikispaces.com/
                Hala Fawzi (a Sudanese Webhead)
                 



                 

                --- On Thu, 9/3/09, Gary Harwell <gharwell1@...> wrote:


                From: Gary Harwell <gharwell1@...>
                Subject: [evonline2002_webheads] Re: Workshop for EFL Teachers at University of Khartoum
                To: evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Thursday, September 3, 2009, 7:12 PM


                 



                While having a workshop anywhere is good, it would have been better if you had included a session about Darfur and teaching English during a famine and extermination of one group by another and how the rest of the world doesn't really give a squat.

                Gary Harwell
                www.teachergary. wikispaces. com

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



















                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • McMorrow, Martin
                I very much concur with Hala s finely-worded response to Gary s posting. And I do hope that this forum doesn t become a focus of political debate and, even
                Message 7 of 15 , Sep 3, 2009
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                  I very much concur with Hala's finely-worded response to Gary's posting. And I do hope that this forum doesn't become a focus of political debate and, even worse, of finger-pointing. The internet is not short of resources for either.

                  My view is that all of us, all the time, are teaching English during times of famine, war, extermination and all kinds of maladies going on - just for most of us here, those problems are relatively far away from our doorsteps. I, for example, live in a quiet, leafy suburb in Auckland where the news stories tend to revolve around cats caught up trees and diamond anniversaries. You could argue that it is people like me, rather than colleagues working in much more challenging environments, who have an obligation to devote greater efforts towards addressing the many problems suffered by people who are much less fortunate than me. I have total freedom to say what I want, when and where I want. I have economic means to do so; I have the technical resources and time to do so. In actual fact, I do next to nothing to right the wrongs of which I am fully aware. I hardly even contribute anything to this forum, of which I am a grateful, but almost entirely passive member. A taker, not a giver, you see. So, anyway, if anyone feels they want to point the finger at someone for not pulling their weight in the social justice area, well, look no further. Seriously, I'm the guilty one.

                  You know, it's not as if I even lack opportunities to highlight all manner of issues. Most of the students I assist in my job here are Chinese, for instance. I can't remember even once, during a learning consultation, saying "Oh by the way, what do you think of the Dall-eye Lamarr?' (deliberate misspelling, of course). I've even been involved in organising a conference of learning advisors here in New Zealand later this year. I have to admit there's not a single presentation on greenhouse gases, for instance, in which NZ is a major offender. Are we all totally oblivious to global warming? It gets worse - my colleague from Fiji seems to have neglected to mention the military dictatorship in her homeland anywhere in her abstract - on a project for writing development, as it happens. And our Australian visitors, one and all, have gone for topics such as 'Online plagiarism software' and 'Activities for database familiarisation' rather than their country's involvement in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan or, indeed, about the ongoing hardships experienced by indigenous people over there. And, once again, I have to put my hand up. I was the one who approved all of these papers, not raising a single objection over the absence of reference to starvation, disease, injustice and conflict.

                  So, are we all - and especially me - just hard-hearted fools - or worse - content to dwell in a trivialised, amoral cocoon of our own making? Or is it just that there's a time and a place for everything?

                  The latter, I hope!

                  Martin McMorrow
                  Massey University, Albany, NZ
                  International Student Podcast http://tinyurl.com/6xy9hy





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                • Hala Fawzi
                  Martin, I truly enjoyed reading your post! I believe this what makes the webheads list fascinating. One day you are stretching your hand for help, the next day
                  Message 8 of 15 , Sep 3, 2009
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                    Martin,
                    I truly enjoyed reading your post!
                    I believe this what makes the webheads list fascinating. One day you are stretching your hand for help, the next day you are lending a helping hand, most of the days you're only a lurker.
                    No one will ever point a finger to you, or any lurker around.
                    Hala


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                  • nina_liakos
                    I read both Hala s and Martin s thoughtful responses. I am currently reading What Is the What? , the story of Valentino Achak Deng, one of the lost boys of
                    Message 9 of 15 , Sep 7, 2009
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                      I read both Hala's and Martin's thoughtful responses. I am currently reading "What Is the What?", the story of Valentino Achak Deng, one of the "lost boys of Sudan", so I am thinking more than usual about this tragic situation. I agree with Martin that I could and should do more than I do to make the world a better place. And I do support the general policy on this board not to talk politics. Thanks to all for writing.

                      Nina
                    • Vance Stevens
                      Cat herder is catching up on these emails and is generally pleased with the way webheads are intelligently and amicably resolving this issue. licking paws,
                      Message 10 of 15 , Sep 7, 2009
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                        Cat herder is catching up on these emails and is generally pleased with the
                        way webheads are intelligently and amicably resolving this issue.

                        licking paws,
                        Vance

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "nina_liakos" <nina.liakos@...>
                        To: <evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Monday, September 07, 2009 7:19 AM
                        Subject: [evonline2002_webheads] Re: Workshop for EFL Teachers at University
                        of Khartoum


                        >I read both Hala's and Martin's thoughtful responses. I am currently
                        >reading "What Is the What?", the story of Valentino Achak Deng, one of the
                        >"lost boys of Sudan", so I am thinking more than usual about this tragic
                        >situation. I agree with Martin that I could and should do more than I do
                        >to make the world a better place. And I do support the general policy on
                        >this board not to talk politics. Thanks to all for writing.
                        >
                        > Nina
                        >
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