Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [evonline2002_webheads] New issue of Innovate on the Net Generation

Expand Messages
  • Aiden Yeh
    Hi Elizabeth, you forgot to include the URL ;-) aiden Dr Elizabeth Hanson-Smith wrote: Thought this
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 3, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Elizabeth, you forgot to include the URL ;-)

      aiden

      Dr Elizabeth Hanson-Smith <ehansonsmi@...> wrote: Thought this free online journal's issue might be of interest to some.
      --Elizabeth

      The April/May issue of Innovate focuses on the Net Generation, a generation that grew up with video games, computers, and the Internet. The expectations, attitudes, and fluency with technology of this new generation present both a challenge and an opportunity for educators. In this special issue of Innovate, guest edited by Chris Davis, we examine how educators and educational systems can respond to the challenge and leverage the opportunity.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






      ---------------------------------
      Don't pick lemons.
      See all the new 2007 cars at Yahoo! Autos.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Paula Emmert
      Great article, Elizabeth. I see both my children, who are 9 and 13, as well as my students being in the Net Geners group, as described in the article. It
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 4, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Great article, Elizabeth. I see both my children, who are 9 and 13,
        as well as my students being in the Net Geners group, as described in
        the article. It definately poses some challenges for us as educators,
        but if anyone can face such challenges- the webheads can! :-)

        Paula

        P.S. It was so great to see you and everyone in Seattle. I'm still
        happy and haven't come down yet from the warmth, comaraderie, and fun
        that we had. Huge hugs and backrubs!


        > Thought this free online journal's issue might be of interest to
        some.
        > --Elizabeth
        >
        > The April/May issue of Innovate focuses on the Net Generation, a
        generation that grew up with video games, computers, and the Internet.
      • Evelyn Izquierdo
        Hi dear Elizabeth and all! Thank you so much for the reference. It is very important to me as a mother, a teacher and a researcher. My 3-year-old baby girl has
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 4, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi dear Elizabeth and all!

          Thank you so much for the reference. It is very important to me as a mother, a teacher and a researcher. My 3-year-old baby girl has already learned how to use the mouse, click and play with pages like www.nickjr.com, www.tudiscoverykids.com, www.sesameworkshop.org and others. My husband and I are really amazed!

          Several weeks ago, Dafne and I were chatting and she placed the emoticons with the mouse. Last week, I was chatting with a student of mine who also had a young kid next to her. Well, both kids didn't allow us to chat until they both chatted too (just using the microphone and the camera, of course). My daughter doesn't know how to read or write, but she learned that when I want to do some Web searching I click on the Internet Explorer icon. Well, she does the same thing. She clicks on the icon and waits until Google' page pops up. She pretends being typing her name in the blank space. It's so funny! After that, I realized that I have a Net kid! Every night, when she sees me in front of the computer, she inmediately starts struggling for having the chance to play.

          I wonder if we are talking about the Net generation entering universities, what to say about my daughter who just celebrated her third birthday in January, and plays her favorite movies in the DVD, turns on/off the TV, turns the volume up and down, and changes the TV channels with the remote control. She doen't use the microwave oven yet because I don't allow her to touch anything in the kitchen. What comes next? Oh, my God!

          Evelyn



          Dr Elizabeth Hanson-Smith <ehansonsmi@...> escribió:
          Thought this free online journal's issue might be of interest to some.
          --Elizabeth

          The April/May issue of Innovate focuses on the Net Generation, a generation that grew up with video games, computers, and the Internet. The expectations, attitudes, and fluency with technology of this new generation present both a challenge and an opportunity for educators. In this special issue of Innovate, guest edited by Chris Davis, we examine how educators and educational systems can respond to the challenge and leverage the opportunity.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






          Evelyn Izquierdo
          Profesora de Inglés
          Escuela de Educación
          Facultad de Humanidades y Educación
          Universidad Central de Venezuela
          Tel: 605.2974 / 2975
          E-mail: izquierdo_evelyn@...

          __________________________________________________
          Correo Yahoo!
          Espacio para todos tus mensajes, antivirus y antispam ¡gratis!
          Regístrate ya - http://correo.espanol.yahoo.com/

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jim
          I just checked the same article out.. but from following another thread. I m currently finishing an MA (Open U) in Distance Ed.. current focus is on
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 5, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            I just checked the same article out.. but from following another
            thread. I'm currently finishing an MA (Open U) in Distance Ed..
            current focus is on "innovations in eLearning" and we've been looking
            at Blogs.. which has led me to "social networking".. .which had led me
            to the article.

            Wow.. it feels like deja vu. I've got two teenagers.. both heavy users
            of IM.. but one is into Bebo (UK equivalent of MySpace) and after
            reading this article.. I took a moment to ask her for a "guided tour".
            Highly recommended folks. What I thought would be a 15 minute tour ..
            turned into almost two hours. What I had assumed to be a pretty simple
            and fun tool opened my ideas to the complexity of the interactions,
            the care in grooming a "digital identity", the attention to building
            and maintaining these "digital communities" that today's teens are
            realizing with such a "simple tool".

            I also read Stephen Downes' piece on Blogging and it was equally
            interesting.

            The $64,000 Question: How do we educators wrestle with incorporating
            such technologies that are "in" with today's Net Gen .. and at the
            same time, work within the restrictions often imposed on us by
            educational systems?

            Cheers


            --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, Evelyn Izquierdo
            <izquierdo_evelyn@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi dear Elizabeth and all!
            >
            > Thank you so much for the reference. It is very important to me as
            a mother, a teacher and a researcher. My 3-year-old baby girl has
            already learned how to use the mouse, click and play with pages like
            www.nickjr.com, www.tudiscoverykids.com, www.sesameworkshop.org and
            others. My husband and I are really amazed!
            >
            > Several weeks ago, Dafne and I were chatting and she placed the
            emoticons with the mouse. Last week, I was chatting with a student of
            mine who also had a young kid next to her. Well, both kids didn't
            allow us to chat until they both chatted too (just using the
            microphone and the camera, of course). My daughter doesn't know how to
            read or write, but she learned that when I want to do some Web
            searching I click on the Internet Explorer icon. Well, she does the
            same thing. She clicks on the icon and waits until Google' page pops
            up. She pretends being typing her name in the blank space. It's so
            funny! After that, I realized that I have a Net kid! Every night,
            when she sees me in front of the computer, she inmediately starts
            struggling for having the chance to play.
            >
            > I wonder if we are talking about the Net generation entering
            universities, what to say about my daughter who just celebrated her
            third birthday in January, and plays her favorite movies in the DVD,
            turns on/off the TV, turns the volume up and down, and changes the TV
            channels with the remote control. She doen't use the microwave oven
            yet because I don't allow her to touch anything in the kitchen. What
            comes next? Oh, my God!
            >
            > Evelyn
            >
            >
            >
            > Dr Elizabeth Hanson-Smith <ehansonsmi@...> escribió:
            > Thought this free online journal's issue might be of
            interest to some.
            > --Elizabeth
            >
            > The April/May issue of Innovate focuses on the Net Generation, a
            generation that grew up with video games, computers, and the Internet.
            The expectations, attitudes, and fluency with technology of this new
            generation present both a challenge and an opportunity for educators.
            In this special issue of Innovate, guest edited by Chris Davis, we
            examine how educators and educational systems can respond to the
            challenge and leverage the opportunity.
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Evelyn Izquierdo
            > Profesora de Inglés
            > Escuela de Educación
            > Facultad de Humanidades y Educación
            > Universidad Central de Venezuela
            > Tel: 605.2974 / 2975
            > E-mail: izquierdo_evelyn@...
            >
            > __________________________________________________
            > Correo Yahoo!
            > Espacio para todos tus mensajes, antivirus y antispam ¡gratis!
            > Regístrate ya - http://correo.espanol.yahoo.com/
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Eric Baber
            Hi Jim, ... of IM.. but one is into Bebo (UK equivalent of MySpace) and after reading this article.. I took a moment to ask her for a guided tour . Highly
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 5, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Jim,

              >Wow.. it feels like deja vu. I've got two teenagers.. both heavy users
              of IM.. but one is into Bebo (UK equivalent of MySpace) and after
              reading this article.. I took a moment to ask her for a "guided tour".
              Highly recommended folks. What I thought would be a 15 minute tour ..
              turned into almost two hours. What I had assumed to be a pretty simple
              and fun tool opened my ideas to the complexity of the interactions,
              the care in grooming a "digital identity", the attention to building
              and maintaining these "digital communities" that today's teens are
              realizing with such a "simple tool".

              <snip>

              >The $64,000 Question: How do we educators wrestle with incorporating
              such technologies that are "in" with today's Net Gen

              I think you just took one of the first, best steps - asking your teenage
              kids to show you what they actually do online and how they do it! One of the
              things we (as in we adults involved in education) have to realise is that we
              live and work in a situation which has built-in tensions: education at the
              moment is top-down - adults at the top design the curriculums and adults in
              the middle implement them to youngsters down below. However, what we're
              *supposed* to be doing is prepare those youngsters for the real world, and
              they are far more in touch with their real world than most adults can be, or
              at least are at the moment. One of the more enlightening experiences I had
              on that front was a few years ago at the Online Educa in Germany. It's a big
              exhibition and conference about online education, with, predictably enough,
              lots of adults giving talks. The one session that stood out to me was one in
              which a couple of high school teachers got their kids up on stage for a Q&A
              session, with the adults in the audience asking the kids questions. After a
              couple of days of talks on educational theory and technological hoo-ha it
              was great. The kids talked about the technology like we in our day would
              have talked about books, or chalk. Of course they used laptops; yes, their
              schools had electronic whiteboards. So? What was all the ruckus about? After
              that was got out of the way the next 40 minutes or so was spent with them
              talking about their use of social networking tools, primarily MSN and
              myspace.

              I think what we need to do is acknowledge that kids are using technology in
              different ways than we might predict or assume (remember what they say about
              assumptions...), and try to find out how they actually use it. That's not to
              say that we then should incorporate their way of doing things into our
              teaching - we might choose to if it makes sense and is useful, but I don't
              think we should force it. Kids will always have their own lives (whether
              it's to do with how they use technology, what sports they play, what they
              watch on TV etc) and we won't always be able to integrate their lives in our
              classrooms, but it can never hurt to find out exactly what it is they're up
              to :-)

              Eric
            • Gavin Dudeney
              Folks, There s an interesting debate going on over on the SLED (Second Life Educators) list about digital immigrants and natives, with lost of people not
              Message 6 of 10 , Apr 5, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                Folks,

                There's an interesting debate going on over on the SLED (Second Life
                Educators) list about digital immigrants and natives, with lost of people
                not approving of the terminology for various reasons - but I'm taking the
                liberty of posting a little of one posting which I found very interesting:

                "out of a recent class of 11 under-grad students I asked to write blogs,
                only one had previously kept a blog. Several used their first post as an
                opportunity to vent their spleens about how much they disliked blogs. ..

                - A recent UK survey found that almost 1 in 5 children play digital games
                less than once every two weeks.

                - One of the first posts on my blog was a link to a piece where a tutor
                discovered to his surprise that a group of his students simply did not like
                using the internet.

                - A BBC Newsround piece on games for learning in the classroom had quotes
                from many children who didn't see why games should be used for teaching and
                (without being given examples of why it could be good) argued that they
                spent enough time playing games without playing them in school too. "

                Gavin



                Gavin Dudeney - Project Director, The Consultants-E
                c/ Ceramica 54, 08035 Barcelona, Spain
                Tel: +34 93 427 4240 | +44 20 7193 0770
                HYPERLINK "http://www.theconsultants-e.com/"http://www.theconsultants-e.com

                Winners, 2007 British Council ELTON awards - HYPERLINK
                "http://tinyurl.com/3e2c54"http://tinyurl.com/3e2c54
                Owners of the Second Life sim EduNation - HYPERLINK
                "http://tinyurl.com/yehbto"http://tinyurl.com/yehbto
                Sponsors of the 2006 UK Moodle Conference - HYPERLINK
                "http://www.moodlemoot.org/"http://www.moodlemoot.org


                CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLAIMER NOTICE
                This email and any attachments are private and confidential. It is intended
                for the recipient only. If you are not the intended recipient, any use,
                disclosure, distribution, printing or copying of this email is unauthorised.
                You may not read, use or take any action in reliance on it. If you have
                received this email in error please notify the sender immediately by
                replying to this email and permanently delete the email from your computer.
                The contents of any attachments to this e-mail may contain software viruses
                which could damage your own computer system. While we have taken every
                reasonable precaution to minimise this risk, we cannot accept liability for
                any damage which you sustain as a result of software viruses. You should
                carry out your own virus checks before opening any attachments.



                _____

                From: evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com
                [mailto:evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eric Baber
                Sent: 05 April 2007 14:05
                To: evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [evonline2002_webheads] Re: The Net Generation



                Hi Jim,

                >Wow.. it feels like deja vu. I've got two teenagers.. both heavy users
                of IM.. but one is into Bebo (UK equivalent of MySpace) and after
                reading this article.. I took a moment to ask her for a "guided tour".
                Highly recommended folks. What I thought would be a 15 minute tour ..
                turned into almost two hours. What I had assumed to be a pretty simple
                and fun tool opened my ideas to the complexity of the interactions,
                the care in grooming a "digital identity", the attention to building
                and maintaining these "digital communities" that today's teens are
                realizing with such a "simple tool".

                <snip>

                >The $64,000 Question: How do we educators wrestle with incorporating
                such technologies that are "in" with today's Net Gen

                I think you just took one of the first, best steps - asking your teenage
                kids to show you what they actually do online and how they do it! One of the

                things we (as in we adults involved in education) have to realise is that we

                live and work in a situation which has built-in tensions: education at the
                moment is top-down - adults at the top design the curriculums and adults in
                the middle implement them to youngsters down below. However, what we're
                *supposed* to be doing is prepare those youngsters for the real world, and
                they are far more in touch with their real world than most adults can be, or

                at least are at the moment. One of the more enlightening experiences I had
                on that front was a few years ago at the Online Educa in Germany. It's a big

                exhibition and conference about online education, with, predictably enough,
                lots of adults giving talks. The one session that stood out to me was one in

                which a couple of high school teachers got their kids up on stage for a Q&A
                session, with the adults in the audience asking the kids questions. After a
                couple of days of talks on educational theory and technological hoo-ha it
                was great. The kids talked about the technology like we in our day would
                have talked about books, or chalk. Of course they used laptops; yes, their
                schools had electronic whiteboards. So? What was all the ruckus about? After

                that was got out of the way the next 40 minutes or so was spent with them
                talking about their use of social networking tools, primarily MSN and
                myspace.

                I think what we need to do is acknowledge that kids are using technology in
                different ways than we might predict or assume (remember what they say about

                assumptions.-..), and try to find out how they actually use it. That's not
                to
                say that we then should incorporate their way of doing things into our
                teaching - we might choose to if it makes sense and is useful, but I don't
                think we should force it. Kids will always have their own lives (whether
                it's to do with how they use technology, what sports they play, what they
                watch on TV etc) and we won't always be able to integrate their lives in our

                classrooms, but it can never hurt to find out exactly what it is they're up
                to :-)

                Eric






                --
                No virus found in this incoming message.
                Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 268.18.26/746 - Release Date: 04/04/2007
                13:09



                --
                No virus found in this outgoing message.
                Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 268.18.26/746 - Release Date: 04/04/2007
                13:09



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Alfred Hopkins
                Jim Perhaps it is not exactly down your line, but you might check out my Spanish-English blog at http://jaquematepress.blogia.com Your comments are welcome!
                Message 7 of 10 , Apr 5, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  Jim
                  Perhaps it is not exactly down your line, but you might check out my Spanish-English blog at
                  http://jaquematepress.blogia.com

                  Your comments are welcome!

                  Alfred
                  <james.buckingham@...> escribió:
                  I just checked the same article out.. but from following another
                  thread. I'm currently finishing an MA (Open U) in Distance Ed..
                  current focus is on "innovations in eLearning" and we've been looking
                  at Blogs.. which has led me to "social networking".. .which had led me
                  to the article.

                  Wow.. it feels like deja vu. I've got two teenagers.. both heavy users
                  of IM.. but one is into Bebo (UK equivalent of MySpace) and after
                  reading this article.. I took a moment to ask her for a "guided tour".
                  Highly recommended folks. What I thought would be a 15 minute tour ..
                  turned into almost two hours. What I had assumed to be a pretty simple
                  and fun tool opened my ideas to the complexity of the interactions,
                  the care in grooming a "digital identity", the attention to building
                  and maintaining these "digital communities" that today's teens are
                  realizing with such a "simple tool".

                  I also read Stephen Downes' piece on Blogging and it was equally
                  interesting.

                  The $64,000 Question: How do we educators wrestle with incorporating
                  such technologies that are "in" with today's Net Gen .. and at the
                  same time, work within the restrictions often imposed on us by
                  educational systems?

                  Cheers

                  --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, Evelyn Izquierdo
                  <izquierdo_evelyn@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi dear Elizabeth and all!
                  >
                  > Thank you so much for the reference. It is very important to me as
                  a mother, a teacher and a researcher. My 3-year-old baby girl has
                  already learned how to use the mouse, click and play with pages like
                  www.nickjr.com, www.tudiscoverykids.com, www.sesameworkshop.org and
                  others. My husband and I are really amazed!
                  >
                  > Several weeks ago, Dafne and I were chatting and she placed the
                  emoticons with the mouse. Last week, I was chatting with a student of
                  mine who also had a young kid next to her. Well, both kids didn't
                  allow us to chat until they both chatted too (just using the
                  microphone and the camera, of course). My daughter doesn't know how to
                  read or write, but she learned that when I want to do some Web
                  searching I click on the Internet Explorer icon. Well, she does the
                  same thing. She clicks on the icon and waits until Google' page pops
                  up. She pretends being typing her name in the blank space. It's so
                  funny! After that, I realized that I have a Net kid! Every night,
                  when she sees me in front of the computer, she inmediately starts
                  struggling for having the chance to play.
                  >
                  > I wonder if we are talking about the Net generation entering
                  universities, what to say about my daughter who just celebrated her
                  third birthday in January, and plays her favorite movies in the DVD,
                  turns on/off the TV, turns the volume up and down, and changes the TV
                  channels with the remote control. She doen't use the microwave oven
                  yet because I don't allow her to touch anything in the kitchen. What
                  comes next? Oh, my God!
                  >
                  > Evelyn
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Dr Elizabeth Hanson-Smith <ehansonsmi@...> escribió:
                  > Thought this free online journal's issue might be of
                  interest to some.
                  > --Elizabeth
                  >
                  > The April/May issue of Innovate focuses on the Net Generation, a
                  generation that grew up with video games, computers, and the Internet.
                  The expectations, attitudes, and fluency with technology of this new
                  generation present both a challenge and an opportunity for educators.
                  In this special issue of Innovate, guest edited by Chris Davis, we
                  examine how educators and educational systems can respond to the
                  challenge and leverage the opportunity.
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Evelyn Izquierdo
                  > Profesora de Inglés
                  > Escuela de Educación
                  > Facultad de Humanidades y Educación
                  > Universidad Central de Venezuela
                  > Tel: 605.2974 / 2975
                  > E-mail: izquierdo_evelyn@...
                  >
                  > __________________________________________________
                  > Correo Yahoo!
                  > Espacio para todos tus mensajes, antivirus y antispam ¡gratis!
                  > Regístrate ya - http://correo.espanol.yahoo.com/
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >






                  Alfredo Hopkins
                  The Buenos Aires Voz Journal
                  http://www.aglat.com/voz (The Voz News magazine)
                  http://www.a-hopkins.com (workshops and shows)
                  http://www.video-scratching.com (películas mudas)
                  4334-1561 Cel: 15 6252 1028





                  ---------------------------------
                  Preguntá. Respondé. Descubrí.
                  Todo lo que querías saber, y lo que ni imaginabas,
                  está en Yahoo! Respuestas (Beta).
                  Probalo ya!

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Susan Burg
                  Dear group, Here in Italy they are reading INNOVATE, too....nice to know... here is the discussion for those of you who understand a little Italian or Spanish!
                  Message 8 of 10 , Apr 6, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Dear group,

                    Here in Italy they are reading INNOVATE, too....nice to know... here is
                    the discussion for those of you who understand a little Italian or
                    Spanish!
                    http://www.lte-unifi.net/elgg/_weblog/everyone.php

                    There were some comments on this recent issue on the Net Geners,
                    comparing students here in Italy to those in North America. Antonio
                    Fini, university professor at the University of Florence made the below
                    statements...to which I replied. He says that:

                    "Un momento però, è necessario precisare che nell'articolo si
                    parla dei giovani statunitensi e canadesi! Ecco il punto: mi chiedo
                    infatti se, qui da noi, esiste questo tipo di Net-gen? E se esiste, la
                    pensa allo stesso modo, riguardo all'educazione? Possibile che tutti
                    i secchioni si siano improvvisamente trasferiti in America e a noialtri
                    abbiano lasciato qui soltanto lazzaroni dediti alla discoteca, ai
                    reality e alle riprese di sederi e sherzacci con il videofonino?"

                    It is necessary to clarify that the rticle talks about young Americans!
                    This is my point: I wonder if here this type of Net gen exists? If so,
                    does it think in the same way with regards to education? Is it possible
                    that all the studious ones have been suddenly transferred to America and
                    we have been left with the lazy students didicated to going to discos,
                    reality shows and to cell phone
                    videos...?

                    I wrote him back discussing the difference between the American and
                    Italian educational system: the main difference lies in the high
                    schools. Here in Italy they are really tough to get through:

                    * students are easily flunked and have to start the whole year over
                    to continue

                    * to get a diploma it takes 5 years with tough state exams at the end
                    * emphasis is on the class and not the individual student
                    * there are no incentives for students to take on more challanging
                    subjects (thus gaining more credits towards diploma)
                    * at 14, students must choose a high school in a specialized field,
                    ie. science/math, art, language, tecnical, tourism, classsical.... one
                    who unwisely chooses can waste time at a very crucial age
                    It is difficult to pass here in Italy...feels to me, educated in the
                    States, like education is for the elite and not for everyone. Old world
                    thinking in the midst of new world learning times!!

                    that is my 2 cents for the day. However, when I responded to Fini in
                    the university blog, he was very interested in what I said and wanted me
                    to continue the discussion....who knows, maybe we can DO SOMETHING TO
                    MAKE IMPROVEMENTS!!!!

                    Susan!






                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Alfred Hopkins
                    Flash! A smashing and dashing tea party will be held at Perroandaluz, 852 Bolivar street, in San Telmo, Buenos Aires, on Saturday 21st, with the presentation
                    Message 9 of 10 , Apr 15, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Flash!
                      A smashing and dashing tea party will be held at Perroandaluz, 852 Bolivar street, in San Telmo, Buenos Aires, on Saturday 21st, with the presentation of the ELT reader "Tea for Two, a tale for you," by Alfred Hopkins and Alicia Ramasco. There will be games, improvisations and...participants will take home a copy of the book!
                      Just $25 pesos. Contacts: 15 62 52 10 28 or alfshopkins@...
                      There is more information at http://jaquematepress.blogia.com


                      Jim <james.buckingham@...> escribió: I just checked the same article out.. but from following another
                      thread. I'm currently finishing an MA (Open U) in Distance Ed..
                      current focus is on "innovations in eLearning" and we've been looking
                      at Blogs.. which has led me to "social networking".. .which had led me
                      to the article.

                      Wow.. it feels like deja vu. I've got two teenagers.. both heavy users
                      of IM.. but one is into Bebo (UK equivalent of MySpace) and after
                      reading this article.. I took a moment to ask her for a "guided tour".
                      Highly recommended folks. What I thought would be a 15 minute tour ..
                      turned into almost two hours. What I had assumed to be a pretty simple
                      and fun tool opened my ideas to the complexity of the interactions,
                      the care in grooming a "digital identity", the attention to building
                      and maintaining these "digital communities" that today's teens are
                      realizing with such a "simple tool".

                      I also read Stephen Downes' piece on Blogging and it was equally
                      interesting.

                      The $64,000 Question: How do we educators wrestle with incorporating
                      such technologies that are "in" with today's Net Gen .. and at the
                      same time, work within the restrictions often imposed on us by
                      educational systems?

                      Cheers

                      --- In evonline2002_webheads@yahoogroups.com, Evelyn Izquierdo
                      <izquierdo_evelyn@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hi dear Elizabeth and all!
                      >
                      > Thank you so much for the reference. It is very important to me as
                      a mother, a teacher and a researcher. My 3-year-old baby girl has
                      already learned how to use the mouse, click and play with pages like
                      www.nickjr.com, www.tudiscoverykids.com, www.sesameworkshop.org and
                      others. My husband and I are really amazed!
                      >
                      > Several weeks ago, Dafne and I were chatting and she placed the
                      emoticons with the mouse. Last week, I was chatting with a student of
                      mine who also had a young kid next to her. Well, both kids didn't
                      allow us to chat until they both chatted too (just using the
                      microphone and the camera, of course). My daughter doesn't know how to
                      read or write, but she learned that when I want to do some Web
                      searching I click on the Internet Explorer icon. Well, she does the
                      same thing. She clicks on the icon and waits until Google' page pops
                      up. She pretends being typing her name in the blank space. It's so
                      funny! After that, I realized that I have a Net kid! Every night,
                      when she sees me in front of the computer, she inmediately starts
                      struggling for having the chance to play.
                      >
                      > I wonder if we are talking about the Net generation entering
                      universities, what to say about my daughter who just celebrated her
                      third birthday in January, and plays her favorite movies in the DVD,
                      turns on/off the TV, turns the volume up and down, and changes the TV
                      channels with the remote control. She doen't use the microwave oven
                      yet because I don't allow her to touch anything in the kitchen. What
                      comes next? Oh, my God!
                      >
                      > Evelyn
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Dr Elizabeth Hanson-Smith <ehansonsmi@...> escribió:
                      > Thought this free online journal's issue might be of
                      interest to some.
                      > --Elizabeth
                      >
                      > The April/May issue of Innovate focuses on the Net Generation, a
                      generation that grew up with video games, computers, and the Internet.
                      The expectations, attitudes, and fluency with technology of this new
                      generation present both a challenge and an opportunity for educators.
                      In this special issue of Innovate, guest edited by Chris Davis, we
                      examine how educators and educational systems can respond to the
                      challenge and leverage the opportunity.
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Evelyn Izquierdo
                      > Profesora de Inglés
                      > Escuela de Educación
                      > Facultad de Humanidades y Educación
                      > Universidad Central de Venezuela
                      > Tel: 605.2974 / 2975
                      > E-mail: izquierdo_evelyn@...
                      >
                      > __________________________________________________
                      > Correo Yahoo!
                      > Espacio para todos tus mensajes, antivirus y antispam ¡gratis!
                      > Regístrate ya - http://correo.espanol.yahoo.com/
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >






                      Alfredo Hopkins
                      The Buenos Aires Voz Journal
                      http://jaquematepress.blogia.com and http://www.aglat.com/voz
                      http://www.a-hopkins.com (workshops and shows)
                      http://www.video-scratching.com (películas mudas)
                      4334-1561 Cel: 15 6252 1028





                      ---------------------------------
                      Preguntá. Respondé. Descubrí.
                      Todo lo que querías saber, y lo que ni imaginabas,
                      está en Yahoo! Respuestas (Beta).
                      Probalo ya!

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.