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Re: interesting article: Too good to be true?

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  • Rita Zeinstejer
    Hi, dear Michael, As soon as I sent my previous email, where I wrote AGAIN, yes, sorry about this....:-(..., about my loneliness on this stuff, I realized
    Message 1 of 21 , Nov 5, 2006
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      Hi, dear Michael,

      As soon as I sent my previous email, where I wrote AGAIN, yes, sorry about this....:-(..., about my "loneliness" on this stuff, I realized I'd make a mistake. In fact, it's not only the 60 teachers who are ignoring all this, but thousands of EFL teachers in Rosario..., if you can believe that...

      I´ve been conducting the CALL SIG here for 6 years now, through the Association of Teachers of English in Rosario, and I've always had JUST between 4 and 5 teachers attending sessions (which I hold once a month). And out of these 5 I have this year, only ONE is intrinsically involved, the other 4, just "comply" with requisites...., and follow a very slow pace...

      Why??? That's my hardest question, a rhetorical one... They will complain about their lack of time, about low pay and more demands, and those very few who are somehow working with the computer use it to retrieve information and for email writing. Incredible but true, believe me.
      I've tried giving open presentations, free sessions, and some will turn up and show interest, but that's it.

      Anyway, as "optimist Tere" says..., it'll be a question of time, and in the meantime, we need to go on preaching. True, "Rome was not built in a day".

      Sorry to be dwelling on this once again, just needed to answer Michael's question, if this can be called an answer.

      Thanks, Michael, for your interest, can understand you disbelief!

      Rita

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John Hibbs
      ... I am not involved in teaching English and I am not involved in trying to motivate teachers to use the new tools. But I am involved in a collegiate
      Message 2 of 21 , Nov 5, 2006
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        At 2:03 AM +1030 11/5/06, Michael Coghlan wrote:
        >
        >Rita - I think you've written about it before, but WHY are you the
        >only one of 60 teachers who is interested in this stuff? Lack of
        >access? Laziness? I do find it hard to believe that you don't have at
        >least a few other teachers on your staff who are willing to try and
        >incorporate web based approaches in their teaching.


        I am not involved in teaching English and I am not involved in trying
        to motivate teachers to use the new tools. But I am involved in a
        collegiate organizations where the leaders of same are as reluctant
        to use the new tools as those Rita talks about. They still operate
        as if there is no Internet -- or that the best (and exclusive?) use
        of the Net is to pass around jokes, or send birthday cards, or chit
        chat. VoiP - you kidding. Web 2.0? huh -- what kind of nut are your?
        desktop sharing? sure, you can put your coffee on my desk anytime and
        we can have a nice talk. Empower students? heck, we are doing that
        all the time; that's why we give them the same tests every year.
      • Carla arena
        Dear all, Michael, Dennis, Tere, Daf, Rita, Webheads, My situation in Brazil is no different from you. In the Binational I teach there are 150 English teachers
        Message 3 of 21 , Nov 6, 2006
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          Dear all, Michael, Dennis, Tere, Daf, Rita, Webheads,

          My situation in Brazil is no different from you. In the Binational I teach
          there are 150 English teachers (yes, 150!) and I'd say that Erika and I are
          the ones really involved in Ed Tech. We could count on one hand the teachers
          that also have been carrying on some interactive online collaboration, but
          only when we give them full support (creating blogs, helping with tools and
          even answering emails!!!).

          We don't have laptops for students, but we do have a computer lab with nice
          computers. The computer lab is always packed, but the teachers generally go
          there to do the online exercises we prepare and make it available on an
          e-folder for the school with all levels we have, separated by units. Most of
          the online exercises could be done at home, but we never give up! We keep
          offering teacher training on how to use tech tools in an interactive,
          motivating way. We've had some success with online collaboration, but the
          teachers are not willing to try by themselves. We need to be there, checking
          if the project is moving ahead...

          We hold all kinds of training throughout the semester and during in-service.
          The attendance is good, teachers think what we do is "Cool", but not for
          them!

          Well, here we are and we never give up!

          Carla

          On 11/5/06, Rita Zeinstejer <rita@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi, dear Michael,
          >
          > As soon as I sent my previous email, where I wrote AGAIN, yes, sorry about
          > this....:-(..., about my "loneliness" on this stuff, I realized I'd make a
          > mistake. In fact, it's not only the 60 teachers who are ignoring all this,
          > but thousands of EFL teachers in Rosario..., if you can believe that...
          >
          > I´ve been conducting the CALL SIG here for 6 years now, through the
          > Association of Teachers of English in Rosario, and I've always had JUST
          > between 4 and 5 teachers attending sessions (which I hold once a month). And
          > out of these 5 I have this year, only ONE is intrinsically involved, the
          > other 4, just "comply" with requisites...., and follow a very slow pace...
          >
          > Why??? That's my hardest question, a rhetorical one... They will complain
          > about their lack of time, about low pay and more demands, and those very few
          > who are somehow working with the computer use it to retrieve information and
          > for email writing. Incredible but true, believe me.
          > I've tried giving open presentations, free sessions, and some will turn up
          > and show interest, but that's it.
          >
          > Anyway, as "optimist Tere" says..., it'll be a question of time, and in
          > the meantime, we need to go on preaching. True, "Rome was not built in a
          > day".
          >
          > Sorry to be dwelling on this once again, just needed to answer Michael's
          > question, if this can be called an answer.
          >
          > Thanks, Michael, for your interest, can understand you disbelief!
          >
          > Rita
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Dennis Newson
          Carla, Thanks for writing. (Very busy people are the ones that always find time, because they are good at using their time, I think). Perwonally, I find it
          Message 4 of 21 , Nov 6, 2006
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            Carla,

            Thanks for writing. (Very busy people are the ones that always find time,
            because they are good at using their time, I think). Perwonally, I find it
            very helpful, more than just interesting, to learn how it is for others. It
            relatavises one's own experience.

            Best wishes,

            Dennis


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Teresa Almeida d'Eca
            Hello, Webheads! The NYTimes Online has an interesting article this morning related to our degree of connectedness (link 1) and then testimonies of people who
            Message 5 of 21 , Aug 16, 2010
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              Hello, Webheads!

              The NYTimes Online has an interesting article this morning related to our degree of connectedness (link 1) and then testimonies of people who took part in their unplugged challenge with some interesting lessons learned (link 2). Hope you enjoy them, as I did. After all, they're related to what I wrote about.

              Outdoors and Out of Reach, Studying the Brain
              http://tinyurl.com/26ktj4a

              The Unplugged Challenge
              http://tinyurl.com/26ugtep

              Hugs, Teresa


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Barbara Dieu
              Great, Teresa. Thank you. Let me complement it with this podcast and various links: A Brief History of Noise
              Message 6 of 21 , Aug 16, 2010
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                Great, Teresa. Thank you.
                Let me complement it with this podcast and various links:
                A Brief History of Noise
                http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/mediaberkman/2010/08/05/radio-berkman-161-a-brief-history-of-noise/

                Warm regards,
                B.

                --
                Barbara Dieu
                http://barbaradieu.com
                http://beespace.net


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Teresa Almeida d'Eca
                Bee, I liked the interview so much that afterwards I listened to her (Kate Crawford s) presentation Mobile Social Media and Attention followed by a long Q&A
                Message 7 of 21 , Aug 16, 2010
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                  Bee, I liked the interview so much that afterwards I listened to her (Kate
                  Crawford's) presentation "Mobile Social Media and Attention" followed by a
                  long Q&A time. Thanks. :-)
                  http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/mediaberkman/2010/08/04/kate-crawford-on-mobile-social-media-and-attention/

                  Hugs, Teresa



                  Sent: Monday, August 16, 2010 2:09 PM
                  Subject: Re: [evonline2002_webheads] interesting article


                  > Great, Teresa. Thank you.
                  > Let me complement it with this podcast and various links:
                  > A Brief History of Noise
                  > http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/mediaberkman/2010/08/05/radio-berkman-161-a-brief-history-of-noise/
                  >
                  > Warm regards,
                  > B.
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