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Re: [evol-psych] Article: An End To Periods? Many Women Opt To Stop Their Menstrual Cycles

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  • steve moxon
    In the past women would have very few periods in their whole lives. Without contraception and with long lactation periods (four years as the norm has been
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 4, 2007
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      In the past women would have very few periods in their whole lives. Without contraception and with long lactation periods (four years as the norm has been suggested), then for most of their pre-menopausal lives women would not be cycling: they would be either pregnant or lactating. They would have periods only for as long as it took to get pregnant through regular sex -- or even quicker with extra-pair sex.
      So it is hard to see how contraceptive methods with no periods would harm women. There may well be benefits in less physical and mental stress. I would have thought there'd be more interest in how the absence of the hormone changes experienced in cycling make women feel sexually/emotionally. Don't some women miss the mid-cycle peak in sexual desire and emotionality?
       
      Steve Moxon
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2007 10:54 AM
      Subject: [evol-psych] Article: An End To Periods? Many Women Opt To Stop Their Menstrual Cycles

      An End To Periods? Many Women Opt To Stop Their Menstrual Cycles

      Science Daily — When birth control pills first hit the market in the 1960s, women generally took three weeks of active contraceptive pills followed by one week of placebos or no pills.

      "The thinking was that women would find this more acceptable, that they would feel like they were having their normal menses," says Susan Ernst, M.D., chief of gynecology services for the University Health Service at the University of Michigan and clinical instructor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the U-M Health System.

      Now, many gynecologists believe that the week without contraception -- during which a woman experiences a "withdrawal bleed" that mimics the normal menstrual cycle -- isn't necessary. And while some debate surrounds the issue, numerous women are opting to take hormonal contraceptive products continually as a way of stopping the cycle entirely or for several months at a time.

      Some women use products such as Seasonale or Seasonique, birth control pills that result in four periods a year; others take birth control pills that have been around for years, but without the week of placebos or no pills. An implantable device was approved during the summer for use in the United States, and injections, patches and vaginal rings are other methods of suppressing menses.

      Ernst points out that suppressing one's menstrual cycle is not very different from taking the three-weeks- on, one-week-off cycle of birth control pills, which women have been doing for decades.

      "When a woman chooses to use hormonal contraceptives, she's giving her body estrogen and progesterone, and that suppresses her own hormonal fluctuations, " Ernst says. "So she's already controlling her cycle by taking those hormonal contraceptives and can further control her cycle by eliminating the pill-free interval or placebo pills."

      She notes that the practice of physicians prescribing contraceptives to stop women's menstrual cycles is not new. "Gynecologists have been doing this for years," she says, "using hormonal contraception for treating women with painful, heavy or irregular periods, or painful premenstrual symptoms."

      Menstrual suppression also has been used among women with endometriosis, a painful condition in which tissue that normally lines the inside of the uterus grows outside of the uterus; patients with disabilities who cannot maintain menstrual hygiene; and women athletes who have a difficult time with their period when competing in games and meets.

      One downside experienced by some women is "breakthrough bleeding," or the unplanned days of spotting or bleeding that can occur when they are not having monthly menses. Shedding menses three to four months after beginning menstrual suppression can help to stop or prevent breakthrough bleeding, Ernst says. "If you shed the lining of the uterus at an every three- to four-month interval, there tends to be less breakthrough bleeding than if you try to go completely menses-free for a year," she says.

      Ernst also notes that there are risks related to hormonal contraception, including blood clots, hypertension, stroke and heart attack, especially among women who smoke. Additionally, long-term use of progesterone injections can lead to a decrease in bone density, and even osteoporosis.

      "A woman has to take those risks into account when thinking about using hormonal contraception for menstrual suppression, " Ernst says. Women should discuss the risks and benefits with their doctors before deciding to suppress their menstrual cycles, she says.

      Facts about menstrual suppression

      • One of the main benefits of menstrual suppression is the elimination or reduction of periods among women who experience painful periods due to endometriosis, heavy bleeding or cramping. Many women also say the ability to suppress their menstrual cycles adds a level of convenience to their lives.
      • Critics contend that too much remains unknown about the effects of menstrual suppression. Some say it prevents women from ridding their bodies of excess iron; that it is unnatural to suppress one's cycle; and that more needs to be known about the effects on women's bone health, heart health and cancer risks.
      • A recent survey by the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals found that 71 percent of women surveyed do not enjoy getting their period each month, and that just 36 percent of clinicians surveyed think the monthly period is something that women have to deal with.
      • A 2003 Gallup Organization survey, conducted for The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, found that 69 percent of women obstetrician- gynecologists believe long-term menstrual suppression is safe, and 30 percent who say it is safe if used occasionally. One percent said it is unsafe.

      For more information, visit these Web sites:

      Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by University Of Michigan Health System.

      Source: University Of Michigan Health System
      http://www.scienced aily.com/ releases/ 2007/01/07010210 2016.htm
       
      Posted by
      Robert Karl Stonjek

    • JVKohl
      I suspect that few women are aware that this mid-cycle peak is supposedly due to cyclical changes in estrogen that allow its positive feedback on luteinizing
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 4, 2007
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        I suspect that few women are aware that this mid-cycle peak is supposedly due
        to cyclical changes in estrogen that allow its positive feedback on luteinizing hormone
        and an accompanying surge in testosterone at the same time they are most fertile,
        have the most desirable natural scent, and are most visually preferred by men. And
        if women are not aware of this, it may be men who most miss the mid-cycle peak--
        or perhaps they will seek it out with a woman who permits her cycle to continue.

        Jim Kohl
        www.pheromones.com

        steve moxon wrote:

        In the past women would have very few periods in their whole lives. Without contraception and with long lactation periods (four years as the norm has been suggested), then for most of their pre-menopausal lives women would not be cycling: they would be either pregnant or lactating. They would have periods only for as long as it took to get pregnant through regular sex -- or even quicker with extra-pair sex.
        So it is hard to see how contraceptive methods with no periods would harm women. There may well be benefits in less physical and mental stress. I would have thought there'd be more interest in how the absence of the hormone changes experienced in cycling make women feel sexually/emotionall y. Don't some women miss the mid-cycle peak in sexual desire and emotionality?
         
        Steve Moxon
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2007 10:54 AM
        Subject: [evol-psych] Article: An End To Periods? Many Women Opt To Stop Their Menstrual Cycles

        An End To Periods? Many Women Opt To Stop Their Menstrual Cycles

        Science Daily When birth control pills first hit the market in the 1960s, women generally took three weeks of active contraceptive pills followed by one week of placebos or no pills.

        "The thinking was that women would find this more acceptable, that they would feel like they were having their normal menses," says Susan Ernst, M.D., chief of gynecology services for the University Health Service at the University of Michigan and clinical instructor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the U-M Health System.

        Now, many gynecologists believe that the week without contraception -- during which a woman experiences a "withdrawal bleed" that mimics the normal menstrual cycle -- isn't necessary. And while some debate surrounds the issue, numerous women are opting to take hormonal contraceptive products continually as a way of stopping the cycle entirely or for several months at a time.

        Some women use products such as Seasonale or Seasonique, birth control pills that result in four periods a year; others take birth control pills that have been around for years, but without the week of placebos or no pills. An implantable device was approved during the summer for use in the United States, and injections, patches and vaginal rings are other methods of suppressing menses.

        Ernst points out that suppressing one's menstrual cycle is not very different from taking the three-weeks- on, one-week-off cycle of birth control pills, which women have been doing for decades.

        "When a woman chooses to use hormonal contraceptives, she's giving her body estrogen and progesterone, and that suppresses her own hormonal fluctuations, " Ernst says. "So she's already controlling her cycle by taking those hormonal contraceptives and can further control her cycle by eliminating the pill-free interval or placebo pills."

        She notes that the practice of physicians prescribing contraceptives to stop women's menstrual cycles is not new. "Gynecologists have been doing this for years," she says, "using hormonal contraception for treating women with painful, heavy or irregular periods, or painful premenstrual symptoms."

        Menstrual suppression also has been used among women with endometriosis, a painful condition in which tissue that normally lines the inside of the uterus grows outside of the uterus; patients with disabilities who cannot maintain menstrual hygiene; and women athletes who have a difficult time with their period when competing in games and meets.

        One downside experienced by some women is "breakthrough bleeding," or the unplanned days of spotting or bleeding that can occur when they are not having monthly menses. Shedding menses three to four months after beginning menstrual suppression can help to stop or prevent breakthrough bleeding, Ernst says. "If you shed the lining of the uterus at an every three- to four-month interval, there tends to be less breakthrough bleeding than if you try to go completely menses-free for a year," she says.

        Ernst also notes that there are risks related to hormonal contraception, including blood clots, hypertension, stroke and heart attack, especially among women who smoke. Additionally, long-term use of progesterone injections can lead to a decrease in bone density, and even osteoporosis.

        "A woman has to take those risks into account when thinking about using hormonal contraception for menstrual suppression, " Ernst says. Women should discuss the risks and benefits with their doctors before deciding to suppress their menstrual cycles, she says.

        Facts about menstrual suppression

        • One of the main benefits of menstrual suppression is the elimination or reduction of periods among women who experience painful periods due to endometriosis, heavy bleeding or cramping. Many women also say the ability to suppress their menstrual cycles adds a level of convenience to their lives.
        • Critics contend that too much remains unknown about the effects of menstrual suppression. Some say it prevents women from ridding their bodies of excess iron; that it is unnatural to suppress one's cycle; and that more needs to be known about the effects on women's bone health, heart health and cancer risks.
        • A recent survey by the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals found that 71 percent of women surveyed do not enjoy getting their period each month, and that just 36 percent of clinicians surveyed think the monthly period is something that women have to deal with.
        • A 2003 Gallup Organization survey, conducted for The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, found that 69 percent of women obstetrician- gynecologists believe long-term menstrual suppression is safe, and 30 percent who say it is safe if used occasionally. One percent said it is unsafe.

        For more information, visit these Web sites:

        Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by University Of Michigan Health System.

        Source: University Of Michigan Health System
        http://www.scienced aily.com/ releases/ 2007/01/07010210 2016.htm
         
        Posted by
        Robert Karl Stonjek

        No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG Free Edition. Version: 7.5.432 / Virus Database: 268.16.5/616 - Release Date: 1/4/2007 1:34 PM
      • steve moxon
        Certainly the women who experience the wilder end of mood swings and the most increase in mid-cycle sexual desire will very clearly notice if their
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 5, 2007
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          Certainly the women who experience the wilder end of mood swings and the most increase in mid-cycle sexual desire will very clearly notice if their sexuality/emotionality levels out. They will realize that it is due to the suspension of cycling through contraception: periods and attendant moods are very well discussed!
          I would have thought that most women -- who have less extreme mood/sexual desire variation through the cycle -- are likely to notice that something has changed and in comparing notes with other women and reading women's mags, also realize what is going on.
          There will be many women who are unconcerned, of course: I know women who declare that it would not perturb them in the least if they never had sex ever again.
           
          Steve Moxon
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: JVKohl
          Sent: Friday, January 05, 2007 1:33 AM
          Subject: Re: [evol-psych] Article: An End To Periods? Many Women Opt To Stop Their Menstrual Cycles

          I suspect that few women are aware that this mid-cycle peak is supposedly due
          to cyclical changes in estrogen that allow its positive feedback on luteinizing hormone
          and an accompanying surge in testosterone at the same time they are most fertile,
          have the most desirable natural scent, and are most visually preferred by men. And
          if women are not aware of this, it may be men who most miss the mid-cycle peak--
          or perhaps they will seek it out with a woman who permits her cycle to continue.

          Jim Kohl
          www.pheromones. com

          steve moxon wrote:

          In the past women would have very few periods in their whole lives. Without contraception and with long lactation periods (four years as the norm has been suggested), then for most of their pre-menopausal lives women would not be cycling: they would be either pregnant or lactating. They would have periods only for as long as it took to get pregnant through regular sex -- or even quicker with extra-pair sex.
          So it is hard to see how contraceptive methods with no periods would harm women. There may well be benefits in less physical and mental stress. I would have thought there'd be more interest in how the absence of the hormone changes experienced in cycling make women feel sexually/emotionall y. Don't some women miss the mid-cycle peak in sexual desire and emotionality?
           
          Steve Moxon
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2007 10:54 AM
          Subject: [evol-psych] Article: An End To Periods? Many Women Opt To Stop Their Menstrual Cycles

          An End To Periods? Many Women Opt To Stop Their Menstrual Cycles

          Science Daily — When birth control pills first hit the market in the 1960s, women generally took three weeks of active contraceptive pills followed by one week of placebos or no pills.

          "The thinking was that women would find this more acceptable, that they would feel like they were having their normal menses," says Susan Ernst, M.D., chief of gynecology services for the University Health Service at the University of Michigan and clinical instructor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the U-M Health System.

          Now, many gynecologists believe that the week without contraception -- during which a woman experiences a "withdrawal bleed" that mimics the normal menstrual cycle -- isn't necessary. And while some debate surrounds the issue, numerous women are opting to take hormonal contraceptive products continually as a way of stopping the cycle entirely or for several months at a time.

          Some women use products such as Seasonale or Seasonique, birth control pills that result in four periods a year; others take birth control pills that have been around for years, but without the week of placebos or no pills. An implantable device was approved during the summer for use in the United States, and injections, patches and vaginal rings are other methods of suppressing menses.

          Ernst points out that suppressing one's menstrual cycle is not very different from taking the three-weeks- on, one-week-off cycle of birth control pills, which women have been doing for decades.

          "When a woman chooses to use hormonal contraceptives, she's giving her body estrogen and progesterone, and that suppresses her own hormonal fluctuations, " Ernst says. "So she's already controlling her cycle by taking those hormonal contraceptives and can further control her cycle by eliminating the pill-free interval or placebo pills."

          She notes that the practice of physicians prescribing contraceptives to stop women's menstrual cycles is not new. "Gynecologists have been doing this for years," she says, "using hormonal contraception for treating women with painful, heavy or irregular periods, or painful premenstrual symptoms."

          Menstrual suppression also has been used among women with endometriosis, a painful condition in which tissue that normally lines the inside of the uterus grows outside of the uterus; patients with disabilities who cannot maintain menstrual hygiene; and women athletes who have a difficult time with their period when competing in games and meets.

          One downside experienced by some women is "breakthrough bleeding," or the unplanned days of spotting or bleeding that can occur when they are not having monthly menses. Shedding menses three to four months after beginning menstrual suppression can help to stop or prevent breakthrough bleeding, Ernst says. "If you shed the lining of the uterus at an every three- to four-month interval, there tends to be less breakthrough bleeding than if you try to go completely menses-free for a year," she says.

          Ernst also notes that there are risks related to hormonal contraception, including blood clots, hypertension, stroke and heart attack, especially among women who smoke. Additionally, long-term use of progesterone injections can lead to a decrease in bone density, and even osteoporosis.

          "A woman has to take those risks into account when thinking about using hormonal contraception for menstrual suppression, " Ernst says. Women should discuss the risks and benefits with their doctors before deciding to suppress their menstrual cycles, she says.

          Facts about menstrual suppression

          • One of the main benefits of menstrual suppression is the elimination or reduction of periods among women who experience painful periods due to endometriosis, heavy bleeding or cramping. Many women also say the ability to suppress their menstrual cycles adds a level of convenience to their lives.
          • Critics contend that too much remains unknown about the effects of menstrual suppression. Some say it prevents women from ridding their bodies of excess iron; that it is unnatural to suppress one's cycle; and that more needs to be known about the effects on women's bone health, heart health and cancer risks.
          • A recent survey by the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals found that 71 percent of women surveyed do not enjoy getting their period each month, and that just 36 percent of clinicians surveyed think the monthly period is something that women have to deal with.
          • A 2003 Gallup Organization survey, conducted for The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, found that 69 percent of women obstetrician- gynecologists believe long-term menstrual suppression is safe, and 30 percent who say it is safe if used occasionally. One percent said it is unsafe.

          For more information, visit these Web sites:

          Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by University Of Michigan Health System.

          Source: University Of Michigan Health System
          http://www.scienced aily.com/ releases/ 2007/01/07010210 2016.htm
           
          Posted by
          Robert Karl Stonjek

          No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG Free Edition. Version: 7.5.432 / Virus Database: 268.16.5/616 - Release Date: 1/4/2007 1:34 PM

        • Richard Harper
          ..Margie Profet and menstruation.. Is anyone up to date on the issues raised around the work of Margie Profet? She wrote about the possible evolutionary role
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 5, 2007
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            ..Margie Profet and menstruation..

              Is anyone up to date on the issues raised around the work
            of Margie Profet? She wrote about the possible evolutionary
            role of menstruation (etc.) in washing out pathogens from that
            critical part of the body.


            (She is perhaps better known for
            her ideas about morning sickness?)


            (Last I recall I think she was working at Bruce Ames lab?)


            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margie_Profet


            From http://www.chester.ac.uk/~sjlewis/DM/TEXTS/TEXT8.HTM
            which is from Scientific American, April, 1996

            "According to her argument, the myriad bacteria that are found in and
            around the genitals of men and women hitch rides on sperm, thereby
            gaining access to the uterus and fallopian tubes. The uterine wall
            sheds each month so it can cleanse the system, washing away the
            contaminants that could cause infection or infertility. As with
            the theory of pregnancy sickness, the menstruation idea awaits
            further study but Profet specifically urges that gynecologists
            check women with particularly heavy flows to see if they have
            active infections. She is again outspoken about being proactive:
            "You get bad theories that people adhere to, and it is killing
            people or causing them a lot of harm." In the scientific community,
            debate continues.


             __


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