Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Women decide on speed-date in seconds

Expand Messages
  • Martin Sewell
    [ source: http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article357660.ece ] Women decide on speed-date in seconds By John von Radowitz Published: 14 April 2006
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 14, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      [ source: http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article357660.ece ]

      Women decide on speed-date in seconds

      By John von Radowitz
      Published: 14 April 2006

      Women are much quicker than men at making up their minds about a
      potential partner, a study has found.

      A speed-dating experiment showed that men have only seconds in which
      to impress a woman - and can stand or fall by the quality of their
      opening chat-up lines. Women were also far more picky than men, and
      less willing to make do with second best.

      Richard Wiseman, a psychologist, recruited 100 visitors to the
      Edinburgh International Science Festival to take part in 500 speed dates.

      Initial results revealed that in about a third of cases, participants
      reached decisions about potential partners in less than 30 seconds.

      This was true of 45 per cent of women's decisions, but only 22 per
      cent of men's.

      Professor Wiseman, from the University of Hertfordshire, who
      conducted the study last Sunday, said: "Men are often accused of
      being shallow and judging women very quickly. However, this evidence
      suggests that women may make up their minds much quicker than men. It
      suggests men have only a few seconds to impress a woman, thus
      emphasising the importance of their opening comments."

      Professor Wiseman's team of researchers compared the conversations of
      participants rated as very desirable or undesirable by their dates.
      The most successful charmers encouraged their dates to talk about
      themselves in an unusual or quirky way.

      As an illustration, the top-rated man's best line was: "If you were
      on Stars in Your Eyes, who would you be?", while the top-rated
      female's winning question was: "What's your favourite pizza topping?"
      Failed Casanovas tended to be far less creative as they struggled to
      impress with comments such as "I have a PhD in computing".

      Women were twice as fussy as men when deciding who they liked, but
      the top-rated man and woman both had a 100 per cent success rate -
      every one of their dates wanted to meet them again.

      Participants were asked to chat about different subjects to assess
      which topics of conversation were best for bringing people together.
      When discussing films, fewer than 9 per cent of the pairs wanted a
      second meeting. But this success rate doubled when the talking point
      was travel.

      A questionnaire found that men and women had very different tastes in
      movies, possibly explaining why films were a poor conversation
      choice. Just under half of men said they liked action films, compared
      with 18 per cent of women, and while 29 per cent of women enjoyed
      musicals this was true of 4 per cent of men.

      "Whenever our couples spoke about films they really increased their
      chances of disagreement," said Professor Wiseman. "In contrast,
      conversations about travel tend to revolve around great holidays and
      dream destinations, and that makes people feel good and so appear
      more attractive to one another."

      In a second study a 30-year-old mechanical engineer went on half-hour
      dates with four women. More than 400 festival-goers took part in an
      online experiment, in which they had to predict which he would find
      most attractive. Most of the participants failed to do so.

      Women are much quicker than men at making up their minds about a
      potential partner, a study has found.

      A speed-dating experiment showed that men have only seconds in which
      to impress a woman - and can stand or fall by the quality of their
      opening chat-up lines. Women were also far more picky than men, and
      less willing to make do with second best.

      Richard Wiseman, a psychologist, recruited 100 visitors to the
      Edinburgh International Science Festival to take part in 500 speed dates.

      Initial results revealed that in about a third of cases, participants
      reached decisions about potential partners in less than 30 seconds.

      This was true of 45 per cent of women's decisions, but only 22 per
      cent of men's.

      Professor Wiseman, from the University of Hertfordshire, who
      conducted the study last Sunday, said: "Men are often accused of
      being shallow and judging women very quickly. However, this evidence
      suggests that women may make up their minds much quicker than men. It
      suggests men have only a few seconds to impress a woman, thus
      emphasising the importance of their opening comments."

      Professor Wiseman's team of researchers compared the conversations of
      participants rated as very desirable or undesirable by their dates.
      The most successful charmers encouraged their dates to talk about
      themselves in an unusual or quirky way.

      As an illustration, the top-rated man's best line was: "If you were
      on Stars in Your Eyes, who would you be?", while the top-rated
      female's winning question was: "What's your favourite pizza topping?"
      Failed Casanovas tended to be far less creative as they struggled to
      impress with comments such as "I have a PhD in computing".

      Women were twice as fussy as men when deciding who they liked, but
      the top-rated man and woman both had a 100 per cent success rate -
      every one of their dates wanted to meet them again.

      Participants were asked to chat about different subjects to assess
      which topics of conversation were best for bringing people together.
      When discussing films, fewer than 9 per cent of the pairs wanted a
      second meeting. But this success rate doubled when the talking point
      was travel.

      A questionnaire found that men and women had very different tastes in
      movies, possibly explaining why films were a poor conversation
      choice. Just under half of men said they liked action films, compared
      with 18 per cent of women, and while 29 per cent of women enjoyed
      musicals this was true of 4 per cent of men.

      "Whenever our couples spoke about films they really increased their
      chances of disagreement," said Professor Wiseman. "In contrast,
      conversations about travel tend to revolve around great holidays and
      dream destinations, and that makes people feel good and so appear
      more attractive to one another."

      In a second study a 30-year-old mechanical engineer went on half-hour
      dates with four women. More than 400 festival-goers took part in an
      online experiment, in which they had to predict which he would find
      most attractive. Most of the participants failed to do so.
    • H.M. Hubey
      Maybe it is because men want to maximize the number of potential sex partners and want to keep them hanging around, whereas women decide to prune the tree
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 15, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Maybe it is because men want to maximize the number of potential sex
        partners
        and want to keep them hanging around, whereas women decide to prune the
        tree quickly of rejects.

        If this interpretation is correct, then women are not being shallow.

        Martin Sewell wrote:
        > Professor Wiseman, from the University of Hertfordshire, who
        > conducted the study last Sunday, said: "Men are often accused of
        > being shallow and judging women very quickly. However, this evidence
        > suggests that women may make up their minds much quicker than men. It
        > suggests men have only a few seconds to impress a woman, thus
        > emphasising the importance of their opening comments."
        >
        >
      • Elizabeth Ross
        ... I agree and think this could be a good example of female systematic thinking rather than superficiality. Perhaps the mental (conscious and subconscious)
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 15, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          H.M. Hubey wrote:
          > Maybe it is because men want to maximize the number of potential sex
          > partners
          > and want to keep them hanging around, whereas women decide to prune the
          > tree quickly of rejects.
          >
          > If this interpretation is correct, then women are not being shallow.
          >
          I agree and think this could be a good example of female systematic
          thinking rather than superficiality. Perhaps the mental (conscious and
          subconscious) process that occurs when a woman meets a potential mate is
          much more involved than might be surmised by the "quick judgment"
          Wiseman observed. Since female mate requirements differ from male's,
          maybe women focus systematic thinking on people by analyzing potential
          mates and female competition using verbal and non-verbal cues. I suspect
          that women learn from an early age to gather clues or indicators about
          others and then to categorize and analyze them in order to gage mate
          potential as witnessed in this speed dating study. Human courtship
          probably wasn't always as much of a long and drawn out affair as in
          recent times, and it very likely benefited a female to judge and act
          quickly when coming into contact with a potential mate.

          I raise the idea of systematic thinking because for some reason this
          made me think about Simon Baron-Cohen's theory that (typically) women
          are empathizers and men are systemizers. I wonder if it only appears
          that women are not typically systematic thinkers because context often
          makes it difficult to perceive the underlying systematic process. So
          even though many women focus their thoughts on assessing people and
          social situations rather than objects or subjects such as science or
          mathematics, this may not reflect much about the thought process
          involved, especially since science and math are pursuits which (until
          very recently) could only be afforded by people who did not have to
          bear, protect, and raise young.

          Cheers,
          Elizabeth
          > Martin Sewell wrote:
          >
          >> Professor Wiseman, from the University of Hertfordshire, who
          >> conducted the study last Sunday, said: "Men are often accused of
          >> being shallow and judging women very quickly. However, this evidence
          >> suggests that women may make up their minds much quicker than men. It
          >> suggests men have only a few seconds to impress a woman, thus
          >> emphasising the importance of their opening comments."
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Orlando Döhring
          Article at: http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/548567/ Paper The Ability to Judge the Romantic Interest of Others by Skyler S. Place, Peter M. Todd, Lars
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 1, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Article at: http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/548567/
            Paper "The Ability to Judge the Romantic Interest of Others" by Skyler S. Place, Peter M. Todd, Lars Penke, and Jens B. Asendorpf at http://www.larspenke.eu/pdfs/Place_Todd_Penke_Asendorpf_2009_-_Judging_romantic_interest.pdf

            Newswise — When it comes to assessing the romantic playing field -- who might be interested in whom -- men and women were shown to be equally good at gauging men's interest during an Indiana University study involving speed dating -- and equally bad at judging women's interest.

            Researchers expected women to have a leg up in judging romantic interest, because theoretically they have more to lose from a bad relationship, but no such edge was found.

            "The hardest-to-read women were being misperceived at a much higher rate than the hardest-to-read men. Those women were being flirtatious, but it turned out they weren't interested at all," said lead author Skyler Place, a doctoral student in IU's Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences working with cognitive science Professor Peter Todd. "Nobody could really read what these deceptive females were doing, including other women."

            Place's study, published in the January issue of the journal Psychological Science, focused on the ability of observers to judge romantic interest between others because this ability has evolutionary benefits when it comes to finding a mate. Decisions that other people around us make, said Place, can influence or inform our own choices.

            "So, if you walk into a room and there's 20 people you've never met before, being able to know which individuals might be available and which are clearly smitten by others can make you more efficient in finding your own romantic interest to pursue," he said.

            For the study, 28 women and 26 men of college age watched video clips of couples interacting on speed dates. Speed dating is a popular commercial method for singles to meet a large number of individuals in one evening of successive brief one-on-one conversations. Each participant observed 24 videos, all with different men and women, and after each rated whether the man seemed interested in the woman and the woman in the man.

            The speed dating sessions were all conducted in Germany while the observer ratings were all made by students in Indiana. Despite the language difference, observers were still able to judge men's romantic interest accurately using body language, tone of voice, eye contact, how often each dater spoke and other non-verbal cues.

            "How people talk might convey more than what they say," Place said.

            Observers did not have to see much of this non-verbal behavior. They were just as good at predicting the speed-dating couple's interest if they saw only 10 seconds of the date as they were if they saw 30 seconds. The researchers say this showed that observers, even with limited information, could make quick, accurate inferences using "thin slices" of behavior.

            There was, however, great variability in how well observers could predict the interest of any particular speed-dater, ranging from 90 percent accuracy down to 10 percent. In five of the videos, 80 percent of the observers thought the women shown were interested when in fact they were not -- they were acting friendly even though they had no interest in the men.

            Evolutionary theory, said Place, predicts a certain level of coyness or even deceptiveness in women because if a relationship is abandoned they may face greater costs, including pregnancy and child rearing. When choosing a mate, it is in a woman's best interest to get men to open up and talk honestly to give her a better idea of whether they would be good long-term partners.

            "In a speed dating environment, you would expect to see these effects dramatically, with the women trying to get the men to be more straightforward, while they themselves remain more coy," Place said. "Though the pace is faster than a typical first date, the strategy remains the same."

            Readers can see how successful they are at judging romantic interest by participating in a new online study that contains the same task as the one described here. To learn more or to participate in the 20-minute experiment being conducted by Place and his research colleagues, visit this site: https://www.indiana.edu/~abcwest/webexp/.




          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.