Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome [SIDS] Risk In Black Babies Tied To Gene Defect

Expand Messages
  • artemispub
    SIDS Risk In Black Babies Tied To Gene Defect POSTED: 5:45 pm EST February 1, 2006 A new study suggests that 5 percent of deaths from sudden infant death
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 2, 2006
    • 0 Attachment

      SIDS Risk In Black Babies Tied To Gene Defect

      POSTED: 5:45 pm EST February 1, 2006

      A new study suggests that 5 percent of deaths from sudden infant death syndrome among black babies can be traced to defects in a gene.

      Half of those deaths result from a common genetic variation that increases an infant's risk of developing an abnormal heart rhythm during times of environmental stress, according to University of Chicago researchers.

      Children with two copies of the common genetic variation have a 24-fold increased risk of sudden death as infants. One out of nine blacks carries one copy of the common variant, but one copy does not appear to increase risk for infants, according to the study, which is published in the February issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

      SIDS -- the sudden and unanticipated death of a seemingly healthy infant -- is the leading cause of infant deaths in the United States. Blacks have a three times greater risk of SIDS than whites and six times the risk of Hispanics or Asians, suggesting a genetic role.

      But SIDS is not purely genetic. The researchers said the syndrome appears to require multiple "hits," some from altered genes and some from the environment.

      "The hope is that findings like this may one day allow us to intervene," said Dr. Steven Goldstein, the study's lead researcher. "We might screen to identify children at high risk and teach parents how to lessen the likelihood of secondary challenges. We have already begun to evaluate drugs that may mitigate the risk."

      Distributed by Internet Broadcasting Systems, Inc.

    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.