Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

The end of male parents?

Expand Messages
  • Mike Tintner
    And in April, Japanese scientists created a mouse with two female parents. They did this by combining the genetic material of two egg cells. They also had to
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 3, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      "And in April, Japanese scientists created a mouse with two female parents. They did this by combining the genetic material of two egg cells. They also had to override a biological phenomenon called imprinting which requires a set of chemical markers from both egg and sperm for an embryo to develop. The technique could have implications for the understanding of human biology."

      2004: The year in biology and medicine - 27 December 2004- NewScientist.com

      ------

      I have to confess that the above news entirely passed me by last year. Does it follow from this that male parents are dispensible?


      ALL-NEW Yahoo! Messenger - all new features - even more fun!
    • Irwin Silverman
      ... combining the genetic material of two egg cells. They also had to override a biological phenomenon called imprinting which requires a set of chemical
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 3, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        On Mon, 3 Jan 2005, Mike Tintner wrote:

        > "And in April, Japanese scientists created a mouse with two female parents. They did this by
        combining the genetic material of two egg cells. They also had to override a biological
        phenomenon called imprinting which requires a set of chemical markers from both egg and sperm
        for an embryo to develop. The technique could have implications for the understanding of human
        biology." 2004: The year in biology and medicine - 27 December 2004- NewScientist.com
        > ------
        >
        > I have to confess that the above news entirely passed me by last year. Does it follow from this
        that male parents are dispensible?

        It sounds like they are talking about mouse chimeras, or mixtures,
        which can be produced from one or two egg pronuclei and have been useful
        in studying genomic imprinting. As far as I am aware, these do not come to
        term. Inasmuch as maternally imprinted genes (silent from mother; expressed
        from father) are vital to placental formation, I assume that they had to
        bypass the placenta somehow to bring one to term. But maternally imprinted
        (paternally expressed) genes are also instrumental to growth, metabolism,
        appetitive behaviors and a variety of hypothalamic functions, so I assume it
        won't turn out to be much of a mouse.
        I.S.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.