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Re: [evol-psych] Re: the difference between archaeology and evolutionary theory

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  • David Smith
    In philosophy of science it s called retrodiction . ... From: TWatk75857@aol.com To: evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2004
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 4, 2004
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      In philosophy of science it's called "retrodiction".
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2004 6:50 PM
      Subject: [evol-psych] Re: the difference between archaeology and evolutionary theory

      Robert Stonjek wrote:
      "But prediction does play a big part in evolutionary biology.  The confounding element is that most of the prediction begins at a point far far far in our prehistory.  Given the initial conditions (of some point in the evolutionary past) and the known environmental changes, an evolutionary theory should be able to predict the evolutionary outcome."
       
      A number of prehistoric archaeologists would say the same of archaeology, but they call this kind of pre-diction of the past post-diction.
       
      Professor Trevor Watkins,
      Archaeology,
      School of Arts, Culture and the Environment,
      University of Edinburgh
    • Michael Maddux
      I think it s better and simpler to call it prediction because you re predicting what future FINDINGS will be. Mike David Smith wrote:
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 5, 2004
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        I think it's better and simpler to call it "prediction" because you're predicting what future FINDINGS will be.
         
        Mike

        David Smith <dsmith06@...> wrote:
        In philosophy of science it's called "retrodiction".
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2004 6:50 PM
        Subject: [evol-psych] Re: the difference between archaeology and evolutionary theory

        Robert Stonjek wrote:
        "But prediction does play a big part in evolutionary biology.  The confounding element is that most of the prediction begins at a point far far far in our prehistory.  Given the initial conditions (of some point in the evolutionary past) and the known environmental changes, an evolutionary theory should be able to predict the evolutionary outcome."
         
        A number of prehistoric archaeologists would say the same of archaeology, but they call this kind of pre-diction of the past post-diction.
         
        Professor Trevor Watkins,
        Archaeology,
        School of Arts, Culture and the Environment,
        University of Edinburgh
      • Robert Karl Stonjek
        David Smith wrote: In philosophy of science it s called retrodiction . ... From: TWatk75857@aol.com To:
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 5, 2004
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          David Smith <dsmith06@...> wrote:
          In philosophy of science it's called "retrodiction".
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2004 6:50 PM
          Subject: [evol-psych] Re: the difference between archaeology and evolutionary theory

          Robert Stonjek wrote:
          "But prediction does play a big part in evolutionary biology.  The confounding element is that most of the prediction begins at a point far far far in our prehistory.  Given the initial conditions (of some point in the evolutionary past) and the known environmental changes, an evolutionary theory should be able to predict the evolutionary outcome."
           
          A number of prehistoric archaeologists would say the same of archaeology, but they call this kind of pre-diction of the past post-diction.
           
          Professor Trevor Watkins,
          Archaeology,
          School of Arts, Culture and the Environment,
          University of Edinburgh
          Mike
          I think it's better and simpler to call it "prediction" because you're predicting what future FINDINGS will be.
           
          RKS:
          Doesn't  'Post-diction' also refer to the anticipatory earlier findings based on the findings already made?  For example, if one had catalogued all the trilobite species of a particular era, would 'Post-diction' refer to the anticipated ancestral species based, perhaps, on some theory or other of how the animal must have evolved?
           
          If not, what is the correct or currently used single term for the phrase, which seems appropriate to me,  "retrograde prediction".
           
          Kind Regards
          Robert Karl Stonjek
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