Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

D'Aprano's Comments Absurd

Expand Messages
  • steve reiss
    D Aprano cited similarities between eating and mountain climbing in order to defend the social psychological concept of intrinsic motivation. His position is
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 31, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      D'Aprano cited similarities between eating and
      mountain climbing in order to defend the social
      psychological concept of intrinsic motivation. His
      position is absurd. According to intrinsic motivation
      theory in social psychology, different KINDS of
      motives energize eating and mountain climbing. It is
      absurd to argue for this hypothesis of dissimilarity
      by citing similarities between eating and mountain
      climbing. (Eating is considered a drive; mountain
      climbing an intrinsic motive. Intrinsic motives are
      defined as not being drives.)

      Steven Reiss


      __________________________________
      Do you Yahoo!?
      Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free web site building tool. Try it!
      http://webhosting.yahoo.com/ps/sb/
    • Steven D'Aprano
      ... I admit it: I m no psychologist, and I m not sure of the difference between a drive and an intristic motive. However, I m fairly certain that intrinsic
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 1, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        On Sun, 1 Feb 2004 05:55 pm, steve reiss wrote:

        > D'Aprano cited similarities between eating and
        > mountain climbing in order to defend the social
        > psychological concept of intrinsic motivation. His
        > position is absurd. According to intrinsic motivation
        > theory in social psychology, different KINDS of
        > motives energize eating and mountain climbing. It is
        > absurd to argue for this hypothesis of dissimilarity
        > by citing similarities between eating and mountain
        > climbing. (Eating is considered a drive; mountain
        > climbing an intrinsic motive. Intrinsic motives are
        > defined as not being drives.)

        I admit it: I'm no psychologist, and I'm not sure of the difference
        between a drive and an intristic motive.

        However, I'm fairly certain that intrinsic motives are defined as
        something more than merely "not being drives". Chocolate ice cream and
        hydrogen bombs are not drives, and presumably they aren't intrinsic
        motives. So if anyone would like to educate me as to what intrinsic
        motives are defined as, and what makes them different from drives, I
        would appreciate it.

        Steve Reiss completely ignored my second example, judo. Is it also
        absurd to argue for this hypothesis of dissimilarity by citing
        similarities between judo and mountain climbing?

        If it is not absurd, then perhaps Steve would like to explain what
        mistake I made in my reasoning regarding judo? Is judo also a drive?

        Whether a drive like eating, or an intrinsic motive like mountain
        climbing, the same applies: too much of a good thing is bad. Too much
        food, too much exercise, too much mountain climbing, or too much judo
        is all the same. The important factor is not that one is a drive and
        one is an intrinsic motive, but that for any activity that gives
        pleasure, there comes a time where that pleasure is satiated.



        --
        Steven D'Aprano
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.