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Evolutionary Economics and Human Nature

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  • Ian Pitchford
    Evolutionary Economics and Human Nature by John Laurent (Editor) Hardcover: 240 pages Publisher: Edward Elgar Pub; (March 2003) ISBN: 1840649232 AMAZON - US
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 31, 2003
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      Evolutionary Economics and Human Nature
      by John Laurent (Editor)
      Hardcover: 240 pages
      Publisher: Edward Elgar Pub; (March 2003) ISBN: 1840649232
      AMAZON - US
      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1840649232/darwinanddarwini
      AMAZON - UK
      http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1840649232/humannaturecom

      Editorial Reviews

      Book Description

      For much of the twentieth century, mainstream economists have treated human
      agents in their models as if they were rational beings of unbounded
      computational capacity - the notorious 'Homo Economicus' of much economic
      theory. However, the patent inadequacies of this understanding of human nature
      have become increasingly apparent, and economists have begun looking for more
      realistic models, incorporating the insights of evolutionary theory.

      The authors address the question of human nature in economics, examining not
      only some of the recent writing on this subject in evolutionary psychology and
      related disciplines, but also the ideas of important thinkers in the Western
      intellectual tradition. Beginning with the ancient Greeks and progressing to
      the modern day, the contributors explore the works of such thinkers as
      Augustine, Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, Alfred Marshall and Kenneth Boulding.

      Many of these works are placed in a Darwinian, evolutionary perspective, with
      the imperative that the study of human nature must be consistent with our
      understanding of human evolution, and should consider how human beings are
      molded by cultural and institutional influences. Naturally, Darwin's own view
      of human nature is also explored, undermining the mistaken notion that
      Darwinism promotes human nature as greedy, uncooperative and self-seeking.

      This enlightening, original and highly readable work will be of great interest
      to professional economists and students, researchers and teachers of
      evolutionary economics.

      About the Author
      John Laurent, Lecturer in the History of Science and Technology, School of
      Science, Griffith University, Australia
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