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Behavior, Crime, Brain Function, IQ, Nutrition, Environmental Quality

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  • A. E. Lewis
    CRIME TIMES: series on Behavior, Crime, Brain Function, IQ, Nutrition, Environmental Quality http://www.crime-times.org/00b/w00bp3.htm Vol. 6, No. 2, 2000 Page
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 2, 2002
      CRIME TIMES: series on Behavior, Crime, Brain Function, IQ,
      Nutrition, Environmental Quality

      http://www.crime-times.org/00b/w00bp3.htm
      Vol. 6, No. 2, 2000 Page 3&6
      School study: Supplementation decreases delinquent behaviors,
      raises IQ

      http://www.crime-times.org/99a/w99ap4.htm
      Vol. 5, No. 1, 1999 Page 3
      Enriched formulas increase babies' IQs

      http://www.crime-times.org/00b/w00bp8.htm
      Vol. 6, No. 2, 2000 Page 7
      A formula for higher IQ?

      http://www.crime-times.org/00a/w00ap7.htm
      Vol. 6, No. 1, 2000 Page 5&6
      Can diet change IQ?

      http://www.crime-times.org/97d/w97dp1.htm
      Vol. 3, No. 4, 1997 Page 1&2&3
      Zeroing in on Pollution, Criminality Connection

      http://www.crime-times.org/98a/w98ap4.htm
      Vol. 4, No. 1, 1998 Page 2
      Link Between Diet and Behavior: Related Research

      http://www.crime-times.org/98a/w98ap1.htm
      Vol. 4, No. 1, 1998 Page 1
      Feature Article: Diet and Behavior

      http://www.crime-times.org/98a/w98ap2.htm
      Vol. 4, No. 1, 1998 Pages 1 & 2 & 3 & 4
      New Studies Show Strong Links Between Diet, Behavior

      http://www.crime-times.org/95a/w95ap10.htm
      Vol. 1, No. 1-2 , 1995, Page 7
      Aggression, Suicide: Zeroing In on a Chemical Culprit

      http://www.crime-times.org/96b/w96bp5.htm
      Vol. 2, No. 2 , 1996, Page 4&5
      Intelligence Scores and Behavior: Even a Few Points Matter

      http://www.crime-times.org/02b/w02bp11.htm
      Vol. 8, No. 2, 2002 Page 5
      Highlights from Research Into ADHD and LD

      http://www.crime-times.org/00a/w00ap1.htm
      Vol. 6, No. 1, 2000 Page 1&5
      ADHD: new evidence of crime link; advocacy group calls for
      research on role of diet, food additives

      http://www.crime-times.org/99a/w99ap2.htm
      Vol. 5, No. 1, 1999 Page 1&2&6
      NIH workshop spurred by findings about omega-3 fatty acids'
      effects on mental ills

      http://www.crime-times.org/00d/w00dp4.htm
      Vol. 6, No. 4, 2000 Page 3&6
      Dyslexia, behavior problems: a fatty acid link?

      http://www.crime-times.org/02b/w02bp4.htm
      Vol. 8, No. 2, 2002 Page 2
      Fatty acid supplements improve behavior, cognition in learning
      disabled children

      http://www.crime-times.org/00c/w00cp1.htm
      Vol. 6, No. 3, 2000 Page 1&3
      Study reveals gains in learning-disabled students given nutrients

      ------------------------------------------------------------------

      ***PLUS***

      [Note: apparently the subjects' DIET was not changed. Rather,
      they recieved a nutritional supplement. -- AEL]

      "The nutrients we provided caused the reduction in anti-social
      behaviour... The greatest reduction was for more serious crimes
      including violence... The improvement was huge" -- Dr Bernard
      Gesch

      -----------------

      http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid_2063000/2063117.stm

      Tuesday, 25 June, 2002, 11:56 GMT 12:56 UK

      Healthy eating 'can cut crime'

      Encouraging healthier eating could be the government's secret
      weapon in the fight against crime, according to experts.

      A study by researchers at the University of Oxford has found that
      adding vitamins and other vital nutrients to young people's diets
      can cut crime.

      They found that improving the diets of young offenders at a
      maximum security institution in Buckinghamshire cut offences by
      25%.

      The study - one of the first to show a scientific link between
      healthy eating and crime - has now been extended to see if the
      findings can be applied to the population in general.

      Bernard Gesch and colleagues at the University of Oxford enrolled
      230 young offenders from HM Young Offenders Institution Aylesbury
      in their study.

      Half of the young men received pills containing vitamins, minerals
      and essential fatty acids. The other half received placebo or
      dummy pills.

      The researchers recorded the number and type of offences each of
      the prisoners committed in the nine months before they received
      the pills and in the nine months during the trial.

      They found that the group which received the supplements committed
      25% fewer offences than those who had been given the placebo.

      The greatest reduction was for serious offences, including
      violence which fell by 40%.

      There was no such reduction for those on the dummy pills.

      'Huge difference'

      The authors described the finding as "remarkable".

      Writing in the British Journal of Psychiatry, they said improving
      diets could be a cost-effective way of reducing crime in the
      community and also reducing the prison population.

      Mr Gesch said: "The supplements just provided the vitamins,
      minerals and fatty acids found in a good diet which the inmates
      should get anyway. Yet the improvement was huge."

      He added: "This approach needs to be re-tested but looks
      to be cheap, highly effective and humane."

      He said that given that nutrients were the building blocks of the
      brain and its associated structures, it was highly likely that a
      good diet would have a direct impact on behaviour.

      The study was organised by Natural Justice, a research charity set
      up in 1991 to investigate the social and physical causes of crime.

      Its chairman Bishop Hugh Montefiore of Birmingham, said: "The
      study is of great importance not only to those who work inside
      prisons but also more widely in the community."

      He added: "There are many causes of anti-social behaviour. But our
      project has shown that an important factor is the lack of proper
      nutrition.

      "The reduction of disciplinary offences by 25% among those who
      took the supplements cannot be shrugged off as insignificant."

      Strong evidence

      Sir David Ramsbotham, former chief inspector of prisons, urged
      officials to consider the findings.

      "It must make sense for the prison service to explore every avenue
      that might enable every prisoner to live a useful and law abiding
      life.

      "If healthy eating is part of a healthy lifestyle, and a healthy
      lifestyle is a crime-free lifestyle, I hope that they will look
      seriously at exploiting the evidence presented to them."

      Ron Blackburn, professor of clinical psychology at the University
      of Liverpool, said: "Efforts to reduce offending usually require
      major resources.

      "This research programme promises to have an impact on antisocial
      behaviour with minimal intervention and deserves full support."

      The BBC's James Ingham

      Internet links:
      British Journal of Psychiatry
      Royal College of Psychiatrists
      HM Prison Service

      ------------------------------------------------------------------

      "Giving all prisoners an improved diet of micronutrients might cost
      about �3.5m [3.5 million pounds] a year, against an overall prison
      service budget of nearly �2bn [2.0 billion pounds]." [Hmmmm.
      Think it is worth .17% of the budget? ;-) -- AEL]

      ---------------

      http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4448386,00.html

      Anti-social conduct may be linked to diet, says study

      James Meikle, health correspondent

      Guardian

      Wednesday June 26, 2002

      Improving the vitamins, minerals and fatty acids in the diets of
      young offenders appeared to reduce their anti-social behaviour
      dramatically, according to a Home Office-backed study.

      Yesterday it prompted calls for further research into the impact
      of nutrition on crime.

      Results of trials in one maximum security institution for 18- to
      21-year-old men suggested that inmates who took special
      supplements committed more than a quarter fewer disciplinary
      offences while serving their sentences than those who were
      unknowingly simply taking dummy pills.

      Significant infringements of discipline, including violence, fell
      by 37%, according to authors of the study, which was organised
      with the help of the Home Office and prison service.

      The results will be published soon in the British Journal of
      Psychiatry.

      Hugh Montifiore, former bishop of Birmingham and chairman of
      Natural Justice, the charity behind the study at the young
      offenders' institution in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, suggested
      that there was a correlation, if not a direct connection, between
      the rises in fast food consumption and youth crime.

      "More and more fast food is being consumed. More and more made-up
      dishes are sold in supermarkets. School meals are a matter of
      choice, the less nutritious they [pupils] like best, and there is
      less and less cooking with proper ingredients.

      "None of us claims that lack of proper nutrition is the sole cause
      of anti-social behaviour. But the evidence does show that it is an
      hitherto unknown major contributor."

      Bernard Gesch, who led the study while he was at Surrey
      University, Guildford, said: "The supplements just pro vided the
      vitamins, minerals and fatty acids found in a good diet which the
      inmates should be getting anyway. Yet the improvement in behaviour
      was huge."

      It was not necessarily long-lasting, however. Shortly after the
      experiment ended staff reported that violence against them rose by
      40%.

      Mr Gesch is now a research scientist in physiology at Oxford
      University as well as director of Natural Justice, which
      investigates causes of criminal behaviour.

      His team pointed out nutrients were crucial ingredients in the
      biochemical processes that produced brain transmitters like
      seratonin and dopamine, which affect mood.

      Giving all prisoners an improved diet of micronutrients might cost
      about �3.5m a year, against an overall prison service budget of
      nearly �2bn.

      Mr Gesch added: "This approach needs to be retested, but it looks
      to be cheap, highly effective and humane."

      The results might be even better in adolescent children, he
      suggested.

      Sir David Ramsbotham, former chief inspector of prisons, said the
      Home Office should carefully consider the implications of the
      study.

      Alan Simpson, Labour MP for Nottingham South, called for other
      studies to be conducted in schools and hospitals.

      He said: "We may be sitting on a timebomb which it is entirely
      within our ability to defuse. If we choose to feed up our kids
      rather than just bang them up, we may also discover we have found
      a better way of bringing them up."

      The government is trying to find ways of changing people's eating
      behaviour without acting like a nanny state. Healthy eating
      messages appear to be quite well understood but are far from
      widely converted into action.

      Guardian Unlimited � Guardian Newspapers Limited 2002

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