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[evol-psych] Re: Brains and Tools

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  • Gerry Reinhart-Waller
    Liz Somerville writes: The vast majority of the evidence we have for early stone tools is essentially circumstantial. There is nothing in terms of the
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 1, 1999
      Liz Somerville writes:
      The vast majority of the
      evidence we have for early stone tools is essentially circumstantial.
      There is nothing in terms of the hand-bones which allows us to rule
      out any of the early hominids as potential tool-makers (e.g. Susman,
      1998 J. Human Evol. 35, 23-46).

      Gerry here:  Perhaps there is.  From the Mousterian cave site in the Crimea, excavated by Gleb Bonch-Osmolovskii in 1925 was found the remains of of an adult and a child.  In 1976 the remains were reconstructed by Emanuel Vlcek for the National Museum of Prague.  The adult remains consisted of extremely massive bones even when compared to Classic Neadertahal from France.  Of special interest is the first finger of the hand; the basal bone is flat at the bottom and there is no opposable thumb.

      References:
      Bonch-Osmolovskii, 1941.  "Kist iskopaemogo cheloveka iz grota Kiik-Kooba"; published in Moscow.

      This volume was traslated from the Russian to English in 1952 for Henry Field by Mrs. David Huxley:  "Hand of Kiik Koba man"; published in Washington, DC.

      And publication on the skeletal feet and legs is:

      Bonch-Osmolovskii, 1954.  "Skelet stopy i goleni iskopaemogo cheloveka iz grota Kiik-Koba": published in Moscow: Izatel'stvo Akademii nauk SSSR/

    • Anne Gilbert
      ... From: Gerry Reinhart-Waller To: Liz Somerville ; evolutionary-psychology@egroups.com Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 1999 12:16 PM Subject: [evol-psych] Re:
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 2, 1999
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 1999 12:16 PM
        Subject: [evol-psych] Re: Brains and Tools

        Gerry here:  Perhaps there is.  From the Mousterian cave site in the Crimea, excavated by Gleb Bonch-Osmolovskii in 1925 was found the remains of of an adult and a child.  In 1976 the remains were reconstructed by Emanuel Vlcek for the National Museum of Prague.  The adult remains consisted of extremely massive bones even when compared to Classic Neadertahal from France.  Of special interest is the first finger of the hand; the basal bone is flat at the bottom and there is no opposable thumb.

        Gerry and all:

        That must be where some people get the idea Neandertals couldn't move their thumbs.  But I have a feeling there was something amiss in that reconstruction.

        Anne Gilbert

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