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Re: [evol-psych] Re: Can defects in the brain identify a psychopath?

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  • Keith Sutherland
    In message , Irwin Silverman writes ... Agreed. Indeed one can make a
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 2, 2002
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      In message
      <Pine.WNT.4.10.10204011404520.-495883@...130.63.168.21>,
      Irwin Silverman <isilv@...> writes
      > From my experience, albeit limited, I have the impression that the
      >essential motivating force for retribution on the part of victims and
      >victims' families is a personal sense of closure, particularly when there
      >was loss of life or some enduring disabling condition.

      Agreed. Indeed one can make a reasonable argument that the entire
      criminal justice system has evolved out of the desire for revenge and
      closure. Such emotions are ignored by juristic rationalists at their
      peril.
      --
      Keith Sutherland

      JKB SUTHERLAND, PUBLISHER
      JOURNAL OF CONSCIOUSNESS STUDIES HISTORY OF POLITICAL THOUGHT
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      IMPRINT ACADEMIC, PO BOX 1, THORVERTON EX5 5YX, UK
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    • Catherine Reason
      ... This seems to me a muddled analogy to say the least. Regardless of whether someone might choose to forgive people responsible for acts of criminal
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 3, 2002
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        Irwin Silverman wrote:

        > In any case, who is to decide whether retribution in the service
        > of closure or forgiveness in the name of mental illness represents
        > the scientifically based enlightened view.

        This seems to me a muddled analogy to say the least. Regardless of whether
        someone might choose to "forgive" people responsible for acts of criminal
        insanity (whatever "forgive" might mean in this context), no-one, so far as
        I know, is advocating that society should facilitate, support or encourage
        the expression of violent and criminal tendencies by the criminally insane.

        If someone is going to argue that retribution in the name of closure is
        something society should facilitate or support, then the appropriate analogy
        would be to argue that society should also facilitate and support the
        expression of violent or homicidal tendencies by the criminally insane, by
        the fanatically motivated or indeed by anyone who can justify a claim to
        feel murderous rage in the name of psychological gratification.

        Another way of looking at this whole idea of "closure", is that it's just
        another manifestation of modern consumer society, in which psychological
        self-gratification is just another commodity we should be allowed to buy,
        acquire or have given to us on a plate. Needless to say, this takes no
        account of the vast numbers of people -- including the victims of crimes for
        which the perpetrator is unlikely even to be prosecuted, let alone
        convicted -- for whom this sort of "closure" is a luxury item which will
        never be available.

        Cathy

        [Catherine Reason]
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