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Fatherhood is bad for sex life and makes men fat - study

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  • Maria Guzman
    ... I just had to pitch in here. OF COURSE men have less sex after the baby is born. What DID they expect? It s a temporary thing normally, but there s no
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 31, 2001
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      >A study of first-time fathers shows men have less sex than they expect after
      >their baby is born.
      >
      >It also shows they put on weight and exercise less.
      >
      >Around 60% say they had sex twice a week before the pregnancy but this fell to
      >26% by the time the baby was one.
      >

      I just had to pitch in here. OF COURSE men have less sex after the baby is
      born. What DID they expect? It's a temporary thing normally, but there's
      no way a woman can act the role of mother/nurturer and sex-goddess
      simultaneously and whole-heartedly. Usually after childbirth any desire
      for sex is nil. The body has to repair itself. And the men can't
      understand this? Desire slowly returns, but fatigue and lost sleep can
      interfere mightily.
      However during the pregnancy itself, often a woman's hormones are in
      overdrive and she becomes...shall we say, insatiable. At least that is the
      experience of some :-)

      >"Men can be particularly vulnerable at this time, with few support networks
      >compared to women," she said.
      >
      >She adds men can be overlooked, with the woman getting the majority of
      >attention from health professionals.
      >

      I must admit I have little sympathy or patience with such men. A woman
      needs a real mensch at such a time, not a second baby. We are a
      self-involved, navel-watching society, needing a crutch - known as an
      'expert' or a 'health professional' to advise us about the simplest acts.
      Mothering is handled very well by the animals; why is it such a mystery to
      modern western women? Not to mention the thumb-sucking males?

      I know and expect the diatribes I shall receive in response. I would
      expect nothing else.

      Maria Guzman
    • Bernhard Fink
      Wynne-Edwards has published a few very good papers on the relationships between steroid (estradiol, testosterone, and cortisol) and peptide (oxytocin,
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 1, 2002
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        Wynne-Edwards has published a few very good papers on the relationships
        between steroid (estradiol, testosterone, and cortisol) and peptide
        (oxytocin, vasopressin, and prolactin) hormones and the expression of
        mammalian paternal behavior. In sum, he suggests that men becoming fathers
        for the first time are similar to their female partners (i.e., there are
        homologous neuroendocrine circuits in male and females).

        Mammalian fatherhood involves a muted version of the maternal experience. In
        spite of previous assumptions to the contrary, hormones influence mammalian
        paternal behavior. Naturally paternal males experience dynamic changes in
        the same hormones involved in maternal behavior and these hormones have
        access to the same brain pathways. Men becoming fathers for the first time
        are similar to their female partners too. These recent studies are still
        correlational, but promise to illuminate maternal behavior and to
        biologically validate the experiences of involved fathers.

        Below is a list of most recent studies:

        Storey AE, Walsh CJ, Quinton RL, Wynne-Edwards KE.
        Hormonal correlates of paternal responsiveness in new and expectant fathers.
        Evol Hum Behav. 2000 Mar 1;21(2):79-95.

        Wynne-Edwards KE, Reburn CJ.
        Behavioral endocrinology of mammalian fatherhood.
        Trends Ecol Evol. 2000 Nov 1;15(11):464-468.

        Berg SJ, Wynne-Edwards KE.
        Changes in testosterone, cortisol, and estradiol levels in men becoming
        fathers.
        Mayo Clin Proc. 2001 Jun;76(6):582-92.

        Wynne-Edwards KE.
        Hormonal changes in mammalian fathers.
        Horm Behav. 2001 Sep;40(2):139-45.


        Bernhard

        ******************************************
        Mag.Bernhard Fink
        Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institute for Urban Ethology
        c/o Institute for Anthropology
        University of Vienna
        Althanstrasse 14
        A-1090 Vienna
        phone: ++43 1 4277 54766
        fax: ++43 1 4277 9547
        email: bernhard.fink@...
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        ******************************************
      • Irwin Silverman
        ... That is Kathy, his grandaughter, a biology prof at Queens University in Kingston, Ontario. V. Wynne-Edwards passed on several years ago.
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 1, 2002
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          On Tue, 1 Jan 2002, Bernhard Fink wrote:

          > Wynne-Edwards has published a few very good papers on the relationships
          > between steroid (estradiol, testosterone, and cortisol) and peptide
          > (oxytocin, vasopressin, and prolactin) hormones and the expression of
          > mammalian paternal behavior. In sum, he suggests that men becoming fathers
          > for the first time are similar to their female partners (i.e., there are
          > homologous neuroendocrine circuits in male and females).

          That is Kathy, his grandaughter, a biology prof at Queens
          University in Kingston, Ontario. V. Wynne-Edwards passed on several
          years ago.
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