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News: In parts of the world, nearly a fourth of men admit to having raped

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  • Robert Karl Stonjek
    In parts of the world, nearly a fourth of men admit to having raped Sept. 10, 2013 Courtesy of The Lancet and World Science staff Nearly a fourth of men in the
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 16, 2013
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      In parts of the world, nearly a fourth of men admit to having raped

      Sept. 10, 2013
      Courtesy of The Lancet
      and
      World Science staff

      Nearly a fourth of men in the Asia-Pacific region admit to having raped someone-at least, if they're asked about it in a way that avoids the word "rape," a study has found.

      Researchers surveyed more than 10,000 men aged 50 and under from six different countries in the region, from both urban and rural areas.

      Male interviewers carried out the surveys but participants answered the most sensitive questions alone, by "self-completing" audio recordings in response to questions. Men weren't asked directly whether they had committed rape or violence, but were rather asked questions such as, "Have you ever forced a woman who was not your wife or girlfriend at the time to have sex?" or "Have you ever had sex with a woman who was too drugged or drunk to indicate whether she wanted it?"

      Eleven percent reported having raped a woman who was not their partner. When men who reported having raped a partner were included, this proportion rose to 24 percent. Of those men who reported having committed rape, 45 percent said they had raped more than one woman.

      When asked why they had committed rape, 73 percent said that they did so for reasons of sexual entitlement, 59 percent for some sort of entertainment, and 38 percent for what they perceived as punishment. Men with a history of being victimized themselves, especially sexually, were found to be more likely to have committed rape.

      A history of physical violence towards a partner, having paid for sex, or having had a large number of sexual partners were also associated with an increased likelihood of having committed rape against a non-partner.

      "In view of the high prevalence of rape worldwide, our findings clearly show that prevention strategies need to show increased focus on the structural and social risk factors for rape," said Rachel Jewkes of South Africa's Medical Research Council, who led the study. "We now need to move towards a culture of preventing the perpetration of rape from ever occurring, rather than relying on prevention through responses."

      The surveys were conducted in Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, and Sri Lanka. The findings are published in the medical journal The Lancet to coincide with a U.N. report on violence against women in Asia and the Pacific.

      Source: World Science
      http://www.world-science.net/othernews/130910_rape

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      Robert Karl Stonjek

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