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Re: [evol-psych] Re: Olfaction spontaneously highlights visual saliency map

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  • james kohl
    Article excerpt: ...we reason it was spontaneous binding between congruent olfactory and visual information [25] that formed a multimodal saliency map where
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 18, 2013
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      Article excerpt: "...we reason it was spontaneous binding between congruent olfactory and visual information [25] that formed a multimodal saliency map where the visual object with added olfactory presence gained increased perceptual saliency."

      Evidently, Maarten thinks that visual primacy enables olfactory input to gain salience (see below). That's typical of the misrepresentation of biologically based fact from my most recently published work: Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model.  Note, there is no model of adaptive evolution where visual input is primary in any species.


      James V. Kohl
      Medical laboratory scientist (ASCP)
      Independent researcher
      Kohl, J.V. (2013) Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 3: 20553.
      Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic influences on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 2: 17338.


      From: Maarten <m.aalberse@...>
      To: evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, August 18, 2013 8:56 AM
      Subject: [evol-psych] Re: Olfaction spontaneously highlights visual saliency map

       
      our results indicate that smells are also automatically factored in"

      Note the word "also".

      "Such a mechanism may facilitate localization of food as well as predators in the long course of evolution, particularly when inputs from the visual channel are crowded."

      How well will that work for human beings living in polluted cities?

      Maarten


      --- In evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com, james kohl wrote:
      >
      > Olfaction spontaneously highlights visual saliency map
      > Kepu Chen1, Bin Zhou1, Shan Chen1, Sheng He2,3 and Wen Zhou1
      >
      > 1Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese
      > Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, People's Republic of China
      > 2State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Beijing 100101, People's Republic of China
      > 3Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
      >
      > Abstract excerpt: "Our discoveries provide robust empirical evidence for a multimodal saliency map that weighs not only visual but also olfactory inputs."
      >
      > Article excerpt: "Smells constantly swirl around us and naturally convey object identities. They are the olfactory transcriptions of the intrinsic chemical compositions of objects [26]. In this regard, smell, similar to visual form, is an inherent attribute contributing to the mental constructions of an object [19,27]. Whereas saliency has commonly been associated with basic visual features [2,3] and visual context [28], our results indicate that smells are also automatically factored in. Such a mechanism may facilitate localization of food as well as predators in the long course of evolution, particularly when inputs from the visual channel are crowded."
      >
      > See also: ScienceShot: Forget Plumage, Birds Sniff Out Good Mates
      >
      >  
      > James V. Kohl
      > Medical laboratory scientist (ASCP)
      > Independent researcher
      > Kohl, J.V. (2013) Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 3: 20553.
      > Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic influences on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 2: 17338.
      >


    • Maarten
      Evidently, Maarten thinks that visual primacy enables olfactory input to gain salience (see below) . Evidently? If so, where IS that evidence? Actually I do
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 19, 2013
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        "Evidently, Maarten thinks that visual primacy enables olfactory input to gain salience (see below)".


        Evidently? If so, where IS that evidence?
         Actually I do NOT think this at all.

        What is more evident is that, for the Nth time, Kohl avoids responding to what is actually said, and instead pulls another strawman out of his hat.

        Maarten



        --- In evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com, james kohl wrote:
        >
        > Article excerpt: "...we reason it was spontaneous binding between congruent olfactory and visual information [25] that formed a multimodal saliency map where the visual object with added olfactory presence gained increased perceptual saliency."
        >
        > Evidently, Maarten thinks that visual primacy enables olfactory input to gain salience (see below). That's typical of the misrepresentation of biologically based fact from my most recently published work: Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model.  Note, there is no model of adaptive evolution where visual input is primary in any species.
        >
        >
        >
        > James V. Kohl
        > Medical laboratory scientist (ASCP)
        > Independent researcher
        > Kohl, J.V. (2013) Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 3: 20553.
        > Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic influences on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 2: 17338.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > >________________________________
        > > From: Maarten m.aalberse@...
        > >To: evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com
        > >Sent: Sunday, August 18, 2013 8:56 AM
        > >Subject: [evol-psych] Re: Olfaction spontaneously highlights visual saliency map
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > 
        > >" our results indicate that smells are also automatically factored in"
        > >
        > >
        > >Note the word "also".
        > >
        > >
        > >"Such a mechanism may facilitate localization of food as well as predators in the long course of evolution, particularly when inputs from the visual channel are crowded."
        > >
        > >How well will that work for human beings living in polluted cities?
        > >
        > >
        > >Maarten

        <snip>
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