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Fw: [human-ethology] Fwd: Science 2013 Into the Minds of Birds

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  • james kohl
    For the consideration of others here, this is another post that Feierman blocked, probably because it does not seem to agree with anything he thinks about bird
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 14, 2013
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      For the consideration of others here, this is another post that Feierman blocked, probably because it does not seem to agree with anything he thinks about bird brains For example, if we must now consider the role of olfaction in avian behavior, new evidence refutes old theories. Since most the old theories were derived from ethologist's works at a time when olfaction was not considered, new evidence must be suppressed lest people like Feierman lose the grounding they thought they had in the biology of behavior (e.g., in birds).

      See also Pheromones in birds: myth or reality?
      The neuroanatomical and neuroendocrine evidence from pheromones in other vertebrates extends to brain imaging studies as it does in all other vertebrates via what's neuroscientifically known about classically conditioned behaviors (as opposed to what's believed about behaviors that involve operant conditioning via tone and foot-shock pairing).
       
      James V. Kohl
      Medical laboratory scientist (ASCP)
      Independent researcher
      Kohl, J.V. (2013) Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 3: 20553.
      Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic influences on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 2: 17338.


      From: Jay Feierman <jay.feierman84@...>
      To: human- ethology <human-ethology@...>
      Sent: Friday, July 5, 2013 9:02 AM
      Subject: [human-ethology] Fwd: Science 2013 Into the Minds of Birds

       
      I (jrf) have a PDF of this article. If you want a copy, send me a personal email at jay.feierman84@... and ask for the Morrel article on bird brains.

      Regards,
      Jay R. Feierman

      Science 341(6141):22-25, 5 July 2013; DOI:10.1126/science.341.6141.22
      Into the Minds of Birds
      A new brain-scanning method offers a window into the brains of birds, which have emerged as the surprising stars of many animal cognition studies
      Virginia Morell


      Bird 7, an American Crow Black of feather, beak, and eye, stood unmoving behind the bars of the cage, his right eye fixed on me. Outside the bars, with a mask covering my face, I sat unmoving, looking back at him. In my outstretched hands lay the corpse of a dead crow. For a full minute, Bird 7 stared at me and the cadaver. In the wild with his fellows, he likely would have also cawed, scolded, and mobbed me, perceiving me as a threat because of my association with a dead crow. As a lone captive, he merely studied my masked face. "Focus on one of his eyes and count the number of times he blinks," John Marzluff, the wildlife biologist behind this experiment at the University of Washington, Seattle, had instructed me. Blinks are a simple measure of a bird's nervousness, and in that minute, I counted 29. Relaxed birds average 36 blinks per minute, a statistically significant difference. Looking at me made Bird 7 nervous.






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