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Re: [evol-psych] Re: A logic (or lack thereof) of genome organization

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  • james kohl
    Edgar the antique dealer has no idea who he s dealing with whether or not I m in or out of the lab.   James V. Kohl Medical laboratory scientist (ASCP)
    Message 1 of 52 , Jun 14, 2013
    Edgar the antique dealer has no idea who he's dealing with whether or not I'm in or out of the lab.
     
    James V. Kohl
    Medical laboratory scientist (ASCP)
    Independent researcher
    Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic influences on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 2: 17338.


    From: mark hubey <hubeev@...>
    To: Evol <evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com>
    Sent: Friday, June 14, 2013 2:47 PM
    Subject: Re: [evol-psych] Re: A logic (or lack thereof) of genome organization

     
    If scientists did not do it, who did?


    "And the stereotype is not confined to children. A survey of general public opinion would readily find a scientist depicted as a white male, middle-aged or older, wearing a lab coat and glasses and featuring some type of facial hair. This image and various literary characters from Dr Faust and Dr Frankenstein to Dr Moreau and Dr Jekyll have contributed to a constructed and more or less unattractive vision of the scientist, often at odds with the self-image cherished by the scientists themselves. These fictional representations and the collective imagination of the scientist are reflections of the response to the role of science and technology in the social context. Even more radically, the actual image of scientists is inseparably linked with the transmutations of science itself, of which the scientist is at the same time product and agent."



    On Fri, Jun 14, 2013 at 8:31 AM, Edgar Owen <edgarowen@...> wrote:
    Mark,

    Many thanks for the article which contains this image of Kohl as a scientist

    An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is 5-7400061i1.jpg


    Edgar




    On Jun 13, 2013, at 9:30 PM, mark hubey wrote:

     




    On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:57 PM, hibbsa <hibbsa@...> wrote:
     


    The interest for me is kind of in line with the basic subject of this list. I think science owes its progress to individuals with personal characteristics some of which Kohl exhibits. That total disregard for consensus views...and total commitement to one's own ideas.

    Why do you need a consensus?  If 1+1=2, you have to stick to your guns.

    He is a scientist.






    --
    Regards,
    Mark Hubey

    "Learning to think in mathematical terms is an essential part of becoming a liberally educated person. "
    -- Kenyon College Math Department Web Page 






    --
    Regards,
    Mark Hubey

    "Learning to think in mathematical terms is an essential part of becoming a liberally educated person. "
    -- Kenyon College Math Department Web Page 



  • charles beck
    Hi Dr Hessels Your comment on my query about the bacteria û immune system arms races and the malleability of the mutation-selection process was most
    Message 52 of 52 , Jun 18, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Dr Hessels
      Your comment on my query about the bacteria – immune system arms races and
      the malleability of the mutation-selection process was most interesting.
      Unfortunately I accidentally erased it. Any chance you could resend it?
      I would also like to follow it up with a lit search. Any authors you might
      suggest would be most welcome.
      Best regards
      Charles Beck
      Prof Emer
      Psychology / Neurosci
      University of Alberta


      -----Original Message-----
      From: evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of BramH
      Sent: Friday, June 14, 2013 8:52 AM
      To: evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [evol-psych] Re: A logic (or lack thereof) of genome organization

      Adaptive evolution only makes sense as a two step process. First there is
      mutation and then there is selection. Mutation provides the raw material
      out of which selection fashions adaptation. To isolate one step (by saying
      that mutation explains adaptation) is not meaningful.

      The strong point of this particular model (which is standard evolutionary
      theory) is that it derives its conclusion (adaptive change) from very
      elementary & non-biological premises.
      Such as:
      1 there is fortuitous random change.
      2 Things exist or not. If things can exist and continue existing they will
      have properties that make them good at existing. (In biology these are
      called 'adaptations')

      (--- In evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com, james kohl <jvkohl@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Thanks for your opinion. If you explain adaptive evolution via mutations
      theory what do you end up explaining?
      >
      >  
      > James V. Kohl
      > Medical laboratory scientist (ASCP)
      > Independent researcher
      > Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic influences
      on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. Socioaffective
      Neuroscience & Psychology, 2: 17338.
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: BramH <br.hessels@...>
      > To: evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Friday, June 14, 2013 4:06 AM
      > Subject: [evol-psych] Re: A logic (or lack thereof) of genome organization
      >
      <Snip>


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