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Re: [evol-psych] News: Big brains, no fur, sinuses . are these clues to our ancestors' lives as 'aquatic apes'?

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  • hibbsa
    Really Jim? You think it s crazy and stupid to think a biological system could evolve to harness the occurence of fire? What about the even crazier idea that a
    Message 1 of 19 , May 5 2:36 PM
      Really Jim? You think it's crazy and stupid to think a biological system
      could evolve to harness the occurence of fire? What about the even
      crazier idea that a biological system could evolve to harness photons
      from outer space? What would be the nutrient dependent pheromone
      controlled adaptive evolution leading to the harnessing of photons from
      outer space?


      --- In evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com, james kohl wrote:
      >
      > From: hibbsa hibbsa@...
      >
      > > JK: The straight and direct answer is that I would never attempt to
      >
      > answer such
      > > a foolish question involving the ability of grasses to genetically
      > harness fire.
      > > However, I might attempt to address a model in which mutations
      somehow
      > enabled
      > > grasses to genetically harness fire. Is there a model for that?
      >
      > So then do you (a) deny that fire was the essential component for why
      > grasses rose to dominance? or (b) accept this is the case but call it
      a
      > lucky intersection of random phenomena?
      > JK: I deny that there is any point whatsoever to such questions in the
      context
      > of evolutionary psychology. Please place the rise of grasses to
      dominance is
      > whatever context you wish to discuss it. Do you want to place it in
      the context
      > of random mutations theory, for example?
      >
      >
      > If (b) then can you explain the distinction between that, and an
      > instance of natural selection involving genetic manifestations such as
      > the ability of grasses to survive fires and simply regrow in their
      wake,
      > given fires actually occured and given grasses rose to dominance as a
      > result, as a randomly assigned selective benefit for those traits?
      > JK: The problem for me is that I have never considered thinking about
      this, must
      > less explaining such distinctions.
      >
      > Or did the traits come about as the result of a non-random process
      involving
      > nutrient gradients or any other mechanism?
      >
      > Or do you have another non-random description for what actually
      occured?
      > JK: I have a description for what you are trying to involve me in:
      it's
      > nonsensical "foolishness." Offer me a theory of how mutations randomly
      caused
      > something to occur if that's what you think might have happened.
      >
      >
      > James V. Kohl
      > Medical laboratory scientist (ASCP)
      > Independent researcher
      > Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic
      influences on the
      > socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. Socioaffective
      Neuroscience &
      > Psychology, 2: 17338.
      >
      <Snip>
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