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Re: [evol-psych] Re: The Necessity for Random Mutations (revisited) [Was: Computer scientists suggest new spin on origins of evolvability]

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  • james kohl
    From: Leif Ekblad JK: Teaching evolutionary theory is not the problem; teaching that ...mutations� are the heart and soul of evolutionary
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 29, 2013
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      From: Leif Ekblad
      JK: Teaching evolutionary theory is not the problem; teaching that "...mutations� are the heart and soul of evolutionary theory" is the problem. Epigenetic effects of sensory input are responsible for adaptive evolution, and everyone with any understanding of the basic principles of biology and levels of biological organization knows that. We first addressed it in the context of molecular epigenetics in our 1996 Review article: From fertilization to adult sexual behavior�

      Your approach here is so hopelessly outdated, that others are not even willing to support your position that "...mutations� are the heart and soul of evolutionary theory," when only a few months ago there were several chiming in.

      Leif Ekblad:
      I�agree with DWZ, and most everybody else (except you) that mutations are the heart and soul of evolutionary theory.

      JK: Then stop trying to communicate with me. Your agreement with fools makes it pointless!

      Leif Ekblad: The retroviral inserts in our genomes points to viruses for novel DNA that evolution could use as a raw material for natural selection.

      JK: And author Greg Bear used my model of pheromonal communication to exemplify in science fiction novels how a new human species arose from non-human primates via HERV-dependent changes.

      Congratulations, you have finally hit upon a biological fact, but missed its importance due to a ridiculous theory.

      James V. Kohl
      Medical laboratory scientist (ASCP)
      Independent researcher
      Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic influences on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 2: 17338.




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