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Re: Epigenetic influences on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors

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  • hibbsa
    I see this as much more the sort of question your model could be helpful in answering. You reu offering a feedback look that could explain how epigenetic
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 26, 2013
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      I see this as much more the sort of question your model could be helpful
      in answering. You'reu offering a feedback look that could explain how
      epigenetic /stress influences could sometimes lead to dna changes. The
      key predictive potential in your model is actually by pursuing the sort
      of questions I mentioned, because this would allow you to eventually
      predict what extent such influences can be causally directed, and what
      amount of randomness there is.

      And no coincidence good predictions could come from a process of 'making
      explicit' ....putting things into a strong form. That's always the
      direction.


      --- In evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com, james kohl wrote:
      >
      > Grandma's Experiences Leave a Mark on Your Genes
      > Your ancestors' lousy childhoods or excellent adventures might change
      your
      > personality by altering expression of genes in your brain.
      >
      > I anticipate another "Stay tuned"-type comment from Clarence 'Sonny'
      Williams.
      > Or perhaps he will tell us how aspects of this article are being hotly
      debated.
      > Is that debate framed in the context of mutations theory, or in the
      context of
      > the microRNA / messenger RNA balance that is clearly epigenetically
      effected and
      > clearly responsible for species divergence?
      >
      >
      > James V. Kohl
      > Medical laboratory scientist (ASCP)
      > Independent researcher
      > Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic
      influences on the
      > socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. Socioaffective
      Neuroscience &
      > Psychology, 2: 17338.
      >
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