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Re: [evol-psych] Adaptive evolution: Mutations don't win out

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  • Leif Ekblad
    James, In my paper that is in peer-review, I prove that there is no increase in neurodiversity since the 1800s with multiple methods. It even seems like there
    Message 1 of 97 , Apr 1, 2013
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      James,
       
      In my paper that is in peer-review, I prove that there is no increase in neurodiversity since the 1800s with multiple methods. It even seems like there is a decrease starting around 1980 because of extensive discrimination.
       
      In addition to that, there is absolutely no proof that forgetting scent is correlated to ASDs. To the contrary, most senses are more accute in ASD, except for pain.
       
      There are some evidence that heavy metals are accumulated in the brains/bodies of autistics, but that seems to be some missing mechanism for getting rid of heavy metals, and is not related to olfaction or pheromones. It could partly be because of dental fillings and grinding teeth, which is more common in ASD.
       
      You also have not yet outlined which part of ASD your model fits with, and how. I'm still waiting for an answer on that one.
       
      Leif Ekblad
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 11:49 PM
      Subject: Re: [evol-psych] Adaptive evolution: Mutations don't win out

      Re: Pesticide makes bees forget the scent for food, new study finds : neonicotinoids

      Pesticide makes bees forget the scent for food, new study finds.
      Widely-used pesticides have been found in new research to block a part of the brain that bees use for learning, rendering some of them unable to perform the essential task of associating scents with food.

      From a correspondent:

      - very relevant to the increase in autism rates and to why so many establishmentarians trumpet the industry-protecting notion merely better diagnosis. 

      James V. Kohl
      Medical laboratory scientist (ASCP)
      Independent researcher
      Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic influences on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 2: 17338.



      From: Leif Ekblad <leif@...>
      

      JK: I've detailed the evidence for the validity of the extrapolation in species from microbes to man and how it involves the molecular mechanisms common to all species, Leif. Is there a species you can think of with molecular mechanisms of protein biosynthesis that are not thermodynamically regulated, which results in organism-level thermoregulation?
      Leif Ekblad: I fail to see what thermoregulation has to do with this. We have honeybees that have some distinct, highly conserved, phenotypes that are only present in honeybees, and you think this can be extrapolated to every species typical difference. The facts are that no mammal have more than two phenotypes (male and female), and that being male and female does not correlate to which species a specimen is part of, and nor is species-typical differences in mating behavior in any way related to pheromones or olfactory. At the very least, there exists no published research that can detail how exactly the species differences in mating behavior are coded by pheromones or nutrition, but you are welcome to publish this and outline the exact mode this operates in. You certainly have no managed to describe how this works here.
       
      In addition to that, I described to you how the ASD spectrum worked, and indicated a genetic spectrum of traits from a common phenotype that in no way resembles the honeybee phenotypes that are highly consistent and conserved, and you didn't bother to describe how this fit into your model, but just claimed that it did fit in. I also described the environmental component of ASD, which might be related to epigenetics and vulnerabilities, and which you and Nils often use as evidence for your "models". However, you couldn't even detail if you meant your model described the genetic spectrum of traits (neurodiversity) or environmental components of ASD, but instead appear to claim you can explain both with your model. Too me, this indicates that you either cannot explain any of them, that you don't understand ASD, or that you are trying to sell a model like any other product, regardless if it fits or not. 
       
      Leif Ekblad
       
    • charles beck
      Hello James and Leif Re ASD and pheromones I believe there is good evidence that the increase in ASD and other neonatal neural deficits is in part due to
      Message 97 of 97 , Apr 1, 2013
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        Hello James and Leif

        Re ASD and pheromones

        I believe there is good evidence that the increase in ASD and other neonatal neural deficits is in part due to delayed child birth (ageing uterus, eggs and sperm- see recent post fr RKS). Have there have been changes in breeding pop pheromones that made/make couples delay having children? These pheromone changes were likely to have been due to dietary changes, e.g. GM foods. For example the author of the book Wheatbelly gives examples of the many untoward effects of GM wheat altered to yield high levels of gluten.

        Best regards

        Charles

         

         

        From: evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com [mailto:evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leif Ekblad
        Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 4:28 AM
        To: evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [evol-psych] Adaptive evolution: Mutations don't win out

         

        




        James,

         

        In my paper that is in peer-review, I prove that there is no increase in neurodiversity since the 1800s with multiple methods. It even seems like there is a decrease starting around 1980 because of extensive discrimination.

         

        In addition to that, there is absolutely no proof that forgetting scent is correlated to ASDs. To the contrary, most senses are more accute in ASD, except for pain.

         

        There are some evidence that heavy metals are accumulated in the brains/bodies of autistics, but that seems to be some missing mechanism for getting rid of heavy metals, and is not related to olfaction or pheromones. It could partly be because of dental fillings and grinding teeth, which is more common in ASD.

         

        You also have not yet outlined which part of ASD your model fits with, and how. I'm still waiting for an answer on that one.

         

        Leif Ekblad

         

         

        ----- Original Message -----

        From: james kohl

        Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 11:49 PM

        Subject: Re: [evol-psych] Adaptive evolution: Mutations don't win out

         

        Re: Pesticide makes bees forget the scent for food, new study finds : neonicotinoids

        Pesticide makes bees forget the scent for food, new study finds.
        Widely-used pesticides have been found in new research to block a part of the brain that bees use for learning, rendering some of them unable to perform the essential task of associating scents with food.


        From a correspondent:

        - very relevant to the increase in autism rates and to why so many establishmentarians trumpet the industry-protecting notion merely better diagnosis. 

        James V. Kohl
        Medical laboratory scientist (ASCP)
        Independent researcher
        Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic influences on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 2: 17338.

         

         


        From: Leif Ekblad <leif@...>


        JK: I've detailed the evidence for the validity of the extrapolation in species from microbes to man and how it involves the molecular mechanisms common to all species, Leif. Is there a species you can think of with molecular mechanisms of protein biosynthesis that are not thermodynamically regulated, which results in organism-level thermoregulation?

        Leif Ekblad: I fail to see what thermoregulation has to do with this. We have honeybees that have some distinct, highly conserved, phenotypes that are only present in honeybees, and you think this can be extrapolated to every species typical difference. The facts are that no mammal have more than two phenotypes (male and female), and that being male and female does not correlate to which species a specimen is part of, and nor is species-typical differences in mating behavior in any way related to pheromones or olfactory. At the very least, there exists no published research that can detail how exactly the species differences in mating behavior are coded by pheromones or nutrition, but you are welcome to publish this and outline the exact mode this operates in. You certainly have no managed to describe how this works here.

         

        In addition to that, I described to you how the ASD spectrum worked, and indicated a genetic spectrum of traits from a common phenotype that in no way resembles the honeybee phenotypes that are highly consistent and conserved, and you didn't bother to describe how this fit into your model, but just claimed that it did fit in. I also described the environmental component of ASD, which might be related to epigenetics and vulnerabilities, and which you and Nils often use as evidence for your "models". However, you couldn't even detail if you meant your model described the genetic spectrum of traits (neurodiversity) or environmental components of ASD, but instead appear to claim you can explain both with your model. Too me, this indicates that you either cannot explain any of them, that you don't understand ASD, or that you are trying to sell a model like any other product, regardless if it fits or not. 

         

        Leif Ekblad

         




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