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News: Do more gun laws mean fewer gun deaths?

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  • Robert Karl Stonjek
    Do more gun laws mean fewer gun deaths? March 6th, 2013 in Health Study says that seems to be the case, but at least one expert calls the research flawed.
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 6, 2013
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      Do more gun laws mean fewer gun deaths?

      March 6th, 2013 in Health
      Do more gun laws mean fewer gun deaths?Study says that seems to be the case, but at least one expert calls the research flawed.

      (HealthDay)—States with the strongest gun laws have fewer gun-related suicides and murders, a new study suggests.

      In the study, researchers analyzed U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention statistics on deaths between 2007 and 2010. They also looked at five categories of gun laws in all 50 states to create a gun law "strength score" for each state. The highest possible score was 28.

      Over the four-year study period, there were more than 121,000 gun deaths in the United States. Average gun-related death rates ranged from a high of 17.9 per 100,000 people in Louisiana to a low of 2.9 per 100,000 in Hawaii. State gun law strength scores ranged from zero in Utah to 24 in Massachusetts.

      States with the highest gun law strength scores (nine or higher) had a lower overall gun-related death rate—6.4 fewer deaths per 100,000—than those with the lowest scores (two or lower).

      The study also found that states with the strongest gun laws had a lower rate of gun-related suicides (6.3 fewer deaths per 100,000) and a lower rate of gun-related deaths (0.4 fewer deaths per 100,000) than states with the weakest gun laws.

      The study was published online March 6 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

      "In conclusion, we found an association between the legislative strength of a state's firearm laws—as measured by a higher number of laws—and a lower rate of firearm fatalities," Dr. Eric Fleegler, of Boston Children's Hospital, and colleagues said in a JAMA news release. "The association was significant for firearm fatalities overall and for firearm suicide and firearm homicide deaths, individually. As our study could not determine a cause-and-effect relationship, further studies are necessary to define the nature of this association."

      In an accompanying editorial, Dr. Garen Wintemute, of the University of California, Davis, said this would be an important study "if it were robust and if its meaning were clear." He said the study provides "no firm guidance."

      "Do the laws work or not? If so, which ones?" he said. "Should policymakers enact the entire package? Some part? Which part?"

      Wintemute called for improvements in the way research into gun violence is conducted, including better data and better data systems.

      "To prevent firearm violence, our research efforts must be substantial and sustained," he wrote.

      More than 30,000 people die each year in the United States from gun-related injuries.

      More information: The American College of Emergency Physicians has more about gun-related deaths and injuries.

      Health News Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

      "Do more gun laws mean fewer gun deaths?." March 6th, 2013. http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-gun-laws-deaths.html

      Posted by
      Robert Karl Stonjek

    • michael haaheim
      A more important question would be whether such laws reduce violent death in general. If there is a significant reduction in violent death and other violent
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 6, 2013
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        A more important question would be whether such laws reduce violent death in general. If there is a significant reduction in violent death and other violent crime rates, such legislation might be valid, but if the overall rate remains the same (or rises), then fewer un related deaths would not justify the laws. Gun rights lobyists insist that guns protect people. The only way to effectively challenge that argument would be to study the correlation between gun law strength (and types) and overall vilent crime.



        De : Robert Karl Stonjek <stonjek@...>
        À : Evolutionary-Psychology <evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com>; Evolutionary Psychology News <evol_psch_news@yahoogroups.com>
        Envoyé le : Jeudi 7 mars 2013 2h51
        Objet : [evol-psych] News: Do more gun laws mean fewer gun deaths?

         

        Do more gun laws mean fewer gun deaths?

        March 6th, 2013 in Health
        Do more gun laws mean fewer gun deaths?Study says that seems to be the case, but at least one expert calls the research flawed.
        (HealthDay)—States with the strongest gun laws have fewer gun-related suicides and murders, a new study suggests.
        In the study, researchers analyzed U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention statistics on deaths between 2007 and 2010. They also looked at five categories of gun laws in all 50 states to create a gun law "strength score" for each state. The highest possible score was 28.
        Over the four-year study period, there were more than 121,000 gun deaths in the United States. Average gun-related death rates ranged from a high of 17.9 per 100,000 people in Louisiana to a low of 2.9 per 100,000 in Hawaii. State gun law strength scores ranged from zero in Utah to 24 in Massachusetts.
        States with the highest gun law strength scores (nine or higher) had a lower overall gun-related death rate—6.4 fewer deaths per 100,000—than those with the lowest scores (two or lower).
        The study also found that states with the strongest gun laws had a lower rate of gun-related suicides (6.3 fewer deaths per 100,000) and a lower rate of gun-related deaths (0.4 fewer deaths per 100,000) than states with the weakest gun laws.
        The study was published online March 6 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.
        "In conclusion, we found an association between the legislative strength of a state's firearm laws—as measured by a higher number of laws—and a lower rate of firearm fatalities," Dr. Eric Fleegler, of Boston Children's Hospital, and colleagues said in a JAMA news release. "The association was significant for firearm fatalities overall and for firearm suicide and firearm homicide deaths, individually. As our study could not determine a cause-and-effect relationship, further studies are necessary to define the nature of this association."
        In an accompanying editorial, Dr. Garen Wintemute, of the University of California, Davis, said this would be an important study "if it were robust and if its meaning were clear." He said the study provides "no firm guidance."
        "Do the laws work or not? If so, which ones?" he said. "Should policymakers enact the entire package? Some part? Which part?"
        Wintemute called for improvements in the way research into gun violence is conducted, including better data and better data systems.
        "To prevent firearm violence, our research efforts must be substantial and sustained," he wrote.
        More than 30,000 people die each year in the United States from gun-related injuries.
        More information: The American College of Emergency Physicians has more about gun-related deaths and injuries.
        Health News Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
        "Do more gun laws mean fewer gun deaths?." March 6th, 2013. http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-gun-laws-deaths.html
        Posted by
        Robert Karl Stonjek


      • Robert Karl Stonjek
        ... From: michael haaheim To: evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, March 07, 2013 6:23 PM Subject: Re: [evol-psych] News: Do more gun laws
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 7, 2013
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          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, March 07, 2013 6:23 PM
          Subject: Re: [evol-psych] News: Do more gun laws mean fewer gun deaths?

          A more important question would be whether such laws reduce violent death in general. If there is a significant reduction in violent death and other violent crime rates, such legislation might be valid, but if the overall rate remains the same (or rises), then fewer un related deaths would not justify the laws. Gun rights lobyists insist that guns protect people. The only way to effectively challenge that argument would be to study the correlation between gun law strength (and types) and overall vilent crime.
           
          RKS:
          In Australia gun related murder and suicide fell sharply and there was a rise in suicide and murder by other means, but the fall was much bigger than the rise for several reasons:
          1. Alternative methods are less effective and people often survive them e.g. the use of a knife;
          Other methods take a degree of planning during which time many people cool off and think better of murder or suicide or simply sober up as the case may be.
           
          Robert
        • michael haaheim
          Yes. That, and other methods tend to require either a significant amount of knowledge, and/or physical strength. Another consideration is accidental death, or
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 7, 2013
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            Yes. That, and other methods tend to require either a significant amount of knowledge, and/or physical strength. Another consideration is accidental death, or a weapon being used against the person who owns it.
            These are the numbers that need to be researched, and put into print. Comparisons of the numbers involving guns is insufficient to counter gun advocacy claims. These other numbers are the ones that need to be published. They need to be well researched, and they need to be correct. Then, they need to be widely distributed.



            De : Robert Karl Stonjek <stonjek@...>
            À : Evolutionary-Psychology <evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com>
            Envoyé le : Jeudi 7 mars 2013 11h25
            Objet : Re: [evol-psych] News: Do more gun laws mean fewer gun deaths?

             
            
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Thursday, March 07, 2013 6:23 PM
            Subject: Re: [evol-psych] News: Do more gun laws mean fewer gun deaths?

            A more important question would be whether such laws reduce violent death in general. If there is a significant reduction in violent death and other violent crime rates, such legislation might be valid, but if the overall rate remains the same (or rises), then fewer un related deaths would not justify the laws. Gun rights lobyists insist that guns protect people. The only way to effectively challenge that argument would be to study the correlation between gun law strength (and types) and overall vilent crime.
             
            RKS:
            In Australia gun related murder and suicide fell sharply and there was a rise in suicide and murder by other means, but the fall was much bigger than the rise for several reasons:
            1. Alternative methods are less effective and people often survive them e.g. the use of a knife;
            2. Other methods take a degree of planning during which time many people cool off and think better of murder or suicide or simply sober up as the case may be.
             
            Robert


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