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Paper: Predicting the evolution of antibiotic resistance

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  • Robert Karl Stonjek
    Predicting the evolution of antibiotic resistance Martijn F Schenk and J Arjan GM de Visser Abstract Mutations causing antibiotic resistance are often
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 23, 2013
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      Predicting the evolution of antibiotic resistance

      Martijn F Schenk and J Arjan GM de Visser

      Abstract

      Mutations causing antibiotic resistance are often associated with a cost in the absence of antibiotics. Surprisingly, a new study found that bacteria adapting to increased temperature became resistant to rifampicin. By studying the consequences of the involved mutations in different conditions and genetic backgrounds, the authors illustrate how knowledge of two fundamental genetic properties, pleiotropy and epistasis, may help to predict the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

      Source: BMC Biology [Open Access Paper]
      http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/11/14

      Posted by
      Robert Karl Stonjek

    • JVKohl
      Pleiotropy and epistasis are nutrient-dependent and pheromone-controlled in my model of adaptive evolution via ecological, social, neurogenic, and
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 24, 2013
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        Pleiotropy and epistasis are nutrient-dependent and pheromone-controlled in my model of adaptive evolution via ecological, social, neurogenic, and socio-cognitive niche construction. Perhaps I should start with how the 2nd law of thermodynamics must first be denied so that heat generation by random molecular motion somehow results in the hydrogen bonds required to construct RNA.

        I would prefer that someone who understands how to link physics to the biology of adaptive evolution does that, nonetheless. I'm not being paid to do it, and might make a mistake, since -- like most physicists -- I don't understand how that works.
        -- 
        James V. Kohl
        Medical laboratory scientist
        ASCP AMT ASCLS
        Independent researcher
        Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors...
        Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 2: 17338.
        http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/snp.v2i0.17338



        On 2/24/2013 1:18 AM, Robert Karl Stonjek wrote:
         

        Predicting the evolution of antibiotic resistance

        Martijn F Schenk and J Arjan GM de Visser

        Abstract

        Mutations causing antibiotic resistance are often associated with a cost in the absence of antibiotics. Surprisingly, a new study found that bacteria adapting to increased temperature became resistant to rifampicin. By studying the consequences of the involved mutations in different conditions and genetic backgrounds, the authors illustrate how knowledge of two fundamental genetic properties, pleiotropy and epistasis, may help to predict the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

        Source: BMC Biology [Open Access Paper]
        http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/11/14

        Posted by
        Robert Karl Stonjek



        -- 
        James V. Kohl
        Medical laboratory scientist
        ASCP AMT ASCLS
        Independent researcher
        Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors...
        Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 2: 17338.
        http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/snp.v2i0.17338
        
        
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