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Re: [evol-psych] News: New research helps explain why girls do better in school

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  • merle lester
    men go to fight wars ..how many men have died for you so you can be free to be who you are?...merle ... men go to fight wars ..how many men have died for you
    Message 1 of 32 , Jan 3, 2013
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       men go to fight wars ..how many men have died for you so you can be free to be who you are?...merle




      On 04/01/2013, at 1:55 PM, nini wrote:



      You are quite amusing, when you try to be, Mark.

      How many MEN have lost their lives attempting to bring NEW life into the world.

      'pini

      On Thu, Jan 3, 2013 at 8:07 PM, mark hubey <hubeev@...> wrote:
       




      On Thu, Jan 3, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Edgar Owen <edgarowen@...> wrote:
       

      It's because most public schools are controlled by women and are feminist training schools...


      Couple of years ago I pointed out the obvious. Let me state the basics

      1) We (whoever we are) want PBE (professional basketball equality) e.g. separate but equal.

      That means we want separate boys and girls schools. Men teach boys, women teach girls.

      At the end we want (demand) the same number/proportion of mathematicians, engineers,
      computer scientists, economists, physicists from both sides (not just welfare jobs and not
      just management jobs for the first out of the gates with fiction-reading degrees (e.g. Liberal ARts).

      2. This means we also conscript boys and girls and create separate but equal batallions,
      brigades and armies and they go off to battle separately. 

      3) We want "historical justice" (feminists style) e.g. to make up for the past. So the long suffering
      females who were stuck home cooking and washing dishes while the boys were out having fun
      massacring each other can now have their cake and eat it too. So since the females are going
      to be conscripted and taught how to fire weapons, they should be allowed to carry weapons like
      men, and be equally willing to protect themselves instead of waiting for males to sacrifice their
      lives, dying early.

      4. Since we are at this we want the death rates equalized. As is plain poor people suffer and die
      early. We want both sexes to die at equal rates.

      5) We want equal numbers of females in jails. For that, since the females have now broken into
      the public before the public was ready by creating new crimes for the kinds of crimes females
      are capable of, we need to pass new laws to make enough females criminals so they can be put
      in jail. Since the bonobos are always having sex, maybe we can now drop some crimes men are
      convicted of. But of course, the easiest would be to convict females of attempted murder when they
      get pregnant without visible means of support (e.g. being dropouts from school, no jobs and no husbands
      to support them). That is the reason why so many men are in jail and so many females wind up prostitutes,
      and drug addicts.

      And of course, my thanks to Jonathan Swift, for A Modest Proposal. 
       

      Edgar



      On Jan 2, 2013, at 6:46 PM, Robert Karl Stonjek wrote:

       


      New research helps explain why girls do better in school

      January 2nd, 2013 in Other Sciences / Social Sciences 

      (Phys.org)—Why do girls get better grades in elementary school than boys—even when they perform worse on standardized tests?

      New research from the University of Georgia and Columbia University published in the current issue of Journal of Human Resources suggests that it's because of their classroom behavior, which may lead teachers to assign girls higher grades than their male counterparts.

      "The skill that matters the most in regards to how teachers graded their students is what we refer to as 'approaches toward learning,'" said Christopher Cornwell, head of economics in the UGA Terry College of Business and one of the study's authors. "You can think of 'approaches to learning' as a rough measure of what a child's attitude toward school is: It includes six items that rate the child's attentiveness, task persistence, eagerness to learn, learning independence, flexibility and organization. I think that anybody who's a parent of boys and girls can tell you that girls are more of all of that."

      The study, co-authored by Cornwell and David Mustard at UGA and Jessica Van Parys at Columbia, analyzed data on more than 5,800 students from kindergarten through fifth grade. It examined students' performance on standardized tests in three categories—reading, math and science—linking test scores to teachers' assessments of their students' progress, both academically and more broadly.

      The data show, for the first time, that gender disparities in teacher grades start early and uniformly favor girls. In every subject area, boys are represented in grade distributions below where their test scores would predict.

      The authors attribute this misalignment to what they called non-cognitive skills, or "how well each child was engaged in the classroom, how often the child externalized or internalized problems, how often the child lost control and how well the child developed interpersonal skills." They even report evidence of a grade bonus for boys with test scores and behavior like their girl counterparts.

      This difference can have long-reaching effects, Cornwell said.

      "The trajectory at which kids move through school is often influenced by a teacher's assessment of their performance, their grades. This affects their ability to enter into advanced classes and other kinds of academic opportunities, even post-secondary opportunities," he said. "It's also typically the grades you earn in school that are weighted the most heavily in college admissions. So if grade disparities emerge this early on, it's not surprising that by the time these children are ready to go to college, girls will be better positioned."

      Research about gender differences in the classroom and beyond has grabbed headlines recently. Titles like Hannah Rosin's "The End of Men and the Rise of Women" and Kay Hymowitz's "Manning Up" have spent months on best-seller lists and inspired countless discussions in the media.

      "We seem to have gotten to a point in the popular consciousness where people are recognizing the story in these data: Men are falling behind relative to women. Economists have looked at this from a number of different angles, but it's in educational assessments that you make your mark for the labor market," Cornwell said. "Men's rate of college going has slowed in recent years whereas women's has not, but if you roll the story back far enough, to the 60s and 70s, women were going to college in much fewer numbers. It's at a point now where you've got women earning upward of 60 percent of the bachelors' degrees awarded every year."

      But despite changing college demographics, the new data may not be reflecting anything fundamentally new.

      "My argument is that this has always been true about boys and girls. Girls didn't all of a sudden become more engaged and boys didn't suddenly become more rambunctious," Cornwell said. "Their attitudes toward learning were always this way. But it didn't show up in educational attainment like it does today because of all the factors that previously discouraged women's participation in the labor force, such as a lack of access to reliable birth control."

      What remains unclear, however, is how to combat this discrepancy.

      "The most common question we've gotten is whether or not the gender of the teacher matters in regards to grading students," Cornwell said. "But that's a question we can't answer because there's just not enough data available. As you can probably guess, the great majority of elementary school teachers are women."

      Provided by University of Georgia

      "New research helps explain why girls do better in school." January 2nd, 2013. http://phys.org/news/2013-01-girls-school.html

      Posted by
      Robert Karl Stonjek






      -- 
      Regards,
      Mark Hubey

      "Learning to think in mathematical terms is an essential part of becoming a liberally educated person. "
      -- Kenyon College Math Department Web Page 






    • merle lester
      yes indeed brad... and behind every man there is a woman probably egging him on.. as for your outlook pini on men you have not had a son or a grandson and
      Message 32 of 32 , Jan 6, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
         yes indeed brad... and behind every man there is a woman probably egging him on..

         as for your outlook pini on men you have not had a son or a grandson and whatever your relationship is was with your father it has coloured your ideas about men..

        .they are not all god's gift but many of them are wonderful human beings  just like you believe ALL  women are.....

         simplistic viewpoints on gender create untold misery..

        please back your statements up with facts and statistics.. not what you believe to be so

        merle


        On 07/01/2013, at 11:57 AM, nini wrote:



        LOL puny list compared to the rapaciousness of male leaders.

        Gengis Khan, Tamerlane, and Adolph Hitler, to name just a few of the worst.

        'pini

        On Sun, Jan 6, 2013 at 7:52 PM, Brad <devilboy6x9@...> wrote:
         

        If it is hard to remember female rulers that were not involved in wars, it is because they were generally weak and ineffectual. It's by this fact that history has, by and large, overlooked them. However there was British queen Boadicea, who in A.D. 60 led a massive but doomed rebellion against the Roman occupation. Queen Victoria, Isabella of Spain, Elizabeth I, Catherine the Great, Catherine II of Russia and Rani of Jhansi, Mutiny of 1857. More recently: Golda Meir, Indira Gandhi and Margaret Thatcher

         
        Brad 



        "In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act."


        -- George Orwell
        Sent: Sunday, January 6, 2013 6:57 PM
        Subject: Re: [evol-psych] News: New research helps explain why girls do better in school

         
        Other than Boudicca of England rising up against the Romans, and the legendary Amazons, I cannot think of a woman who declared a war.  Even Boudicca had ample reason after the rapes of her and her daughters by the Romans.

        'pini

        On Sun, Jan 6, 2013 at 6:27 PM, merle lester <bmlester@...> wrote:
         
        regardless of who starts the wars....... (there is an old saying "the hand that rocks the cradle rules the world.."..)

        men go to war and loose their lives..

        wars have been going on since the year dot..and saying all men start wars  is a  simplistic viewpoint.

        .merle



        On 07/01/2013, at 4:58 AM, Julienne wrote:



        At 01:47 AM 1/4/2013, merle lester wrote:



         men go to fight wars ..how many men have died for you so you can be free to be who you are?...merle


        And it is mostly men start these inglorious wars - and then sacrifice their sons - and daughters, and murder populations all over the world - for NO good purposes.

        There are no good wars...

        Soldiers don't make sacrifices - they are sacrificd.

        Julienne




        On 04/01/2013, at 1:55 PM, nini wrote:



        You are quite amusing, when you try to be, Mark.

        How many MEN have lost their lives attempting to bring NEW life into the world.

        'pini

        On Thu, Jan 3, 2013 at 8:07 PM, mark hubey <hubeev@...> wrote:
         




        On Thu, Jan 3, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Edgar Owen <edgarowen@...> wrote:
         

        It's because most public schools are controlled by women and are feminist training schools...


        Couple of years ago I pointed out the obvious. Let me state the basics

        1) We (whoever we are) want PBE (professional basketball equality) e.g. separate but equal.

        That means we want separate boys and girls schools. Men teach boys, women teach girls.

        At the end we want (demand) the same number/proportion of mathematicians, engineers,
        computer scientists, economists, physicists from both sides (not just welfare jobs and not
        just management jobs for the first out of the gates with fiction-reading degrees (e.g. Liberal ARts).

        2. This means we also conscript boys and girls and create separate but equal batallions,
        brigades and armies and they go off to battle separately. 

        3) We want "historical justice" (feminists style) e.g. to make up for the past. So the long suffering
        females who were stuck home cooking and washing dishes while the boys were out having fun
        massacring each other can now have their cake and eat it too. So since the females are going
        to be conscripted and taught how to fire weapons, they should be allowed to carry weapons like
        men, and be equally willing to protect themselves instead of waiting for males to sacrifice their
        lives, dying early.

        4. Since we are at this we want the death rates equalized. As is plain poor people suffer and die
        early. We want both sexes to die at equal rates.

        5) We want equal numbers of females in jails. For that, since the females have now broken into
        the public before the public was ready by creating new crimes for the kinds of crimes females
        are capable of, we need to pass new laws to make enough females criminals so they can be put
        in jail. Since the bonobos are always having sex, maybe we can now drop some crimes men are
        convicted of. But of course, the easiest would be to convict females of attempted murder when they
        get pregnant without visible means of support (e.g. being dropouts from school, no jobs and no husbands
        to support them). That is the reason why so many men are in jail and so many females wind up prostitutes,
        and drug addicts.

        And of course, my thanks to Jonathan Swift, for A Modest Proposal. 
         

        Edgar



        On Jan 2, 2013, at 6:46 PM, Robert Karl Stonjek wrote:

         



        New research helps explain why girls do better in school



        January 2nd, 2013 in Other Sciences / Social Sciences 

        (Phys.org)—Why do girls get better grades in elementary school than boys—even when they perform worse on standardized tests?

        New research from the University of Georgia and Columbia University published in the current issue of Journal of Human Resources suggests that it's because of their classroom behavior, which may lead teachers to assign girls higher grades than their male counterparts.

        "The skill that matters the most in regards to how teachers graded their students is what we refer to as 'approaches toward learning,'" said Christopher Cornwell, head of economics in the UGA Terry College of Business and one of the study's authors. "You can think of 'approaches to learning' as a rough measure of what a child's attitude toward school is: It includes six items that rate the child's attentiveness, task persistence, eagerness to learn, learning independence, flexibility and organization. I think that anybody who's a parent of boys and girls can tell you that girls are more of all of that."

        The study, co-authored by Cornwell and David Mustard at UGA and Jessica Van Parys at Columbia, analyzed data on more than 5,800 students from kindergarten through fifth grade. It examined students' performance on standardized tests in three categories—reading, math and science—linking test scores to teachers' assessments of their students' progress, both academically and more broadly.

        The data show, for the first time, that gender disparities in teacher grades start early and uniformly favor girls. In every subject area, boys are represented in grade distributions below where their test scores would predict.

        The authors attribute this misalignment to what they called non-cognitive skills, or "how well each child was engaged in the classroom, how often the child externalized or internalized problems, how often the child lost control and how well the child developed interpersonal skills." They even report evidence of a grade bonus for boys with test scores and behavior like their girl counterparts.

        This difference can have long-reaching effects, Cornwell said.

        "The trajectory at which kids move through school is often influenced by a teacher's assessment of their performance, their grades. This affects their ability to enter into advanced classes and other kinds of academic opportunities, even post-secondary opportunities," he said. "It's also typically the grades you earn in school that are weighted the most heavily in college admissions. So if grade disparities emerge this early on, it's not surprising that by the time these children are ready to go to college, girls will be better positioned."

        Research about gender differences in the classroom and beyond has grabbed headlines recently. Titles like Hannah Rosin's "The End of Men and the Rise of Women" and Kay Hymowitz's "Manning Up" have spent months on best-seller lists and inspired countless discussions in the media.

        "We seem to have gotten to a point in the popular consciousness where people are recognizing the story in these data: Men are falling behind relative to women. Economists have looked at this from a number of different angles, but it's in educational assessments that you make your mark for the labor market," Cornwell said. "Men's rate of college going has slowed in recent years whereas women's has not, but if you roll the story back far enough, to the 60s and 70s, women were going to college in much fewer numbers. It's at a point now where you've got women earning upward of 60 percent of the bachelors' degrees awarded every year."

        But despite changing college demographics, the new data may not be reflecting anything fundamentally new.

        "My argument is that this has always been true about boys and girls. Girls didn't all of a sudden become more engaged and boys didn't suddenly become more rambunctious," Cornwell said. "Their attitudes toward learning were always this way. But it didn't show up in educational attainment like it does today because of all the factors that previously discouraged women's participation in the labor force, such as a lack of access to reliable birth control."

        What remains unclear, however, is how to combat this discrepancy.

        "The most common question we've gotten is whether or not the gender of the teacher matters in regards to grading students," Cornwell said. "But that's a question we can't answer because there's just not enough data available. As you can probably guess, the great majority of elementary school teachers are women."

        Provided by University of Georgia

        "New research helps explain why girls do better in school." January 2nd, 2013. http://phys.org/news/2013-01-girls-school.html
        Posted by
        Robert Karl Stonjek





        -- 
        Regards,
        Mark Hubey

        "Learning to think in mathematical terms is an essential part of becoming a liberally educated person. "
        -- Kenyon College Math Department Web Page 

        http://www.fordham.edu/academics/programs_at_fordham_/mathematics_departme/what_math/index.asp 







        Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ from the prejudices of their social environment. Most people are even incapable of forming such opinions.
                    -- Albert Einstein











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