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Re: [evol-psych] Millionaires Prefer Dogs

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  • merle lester
    this is generalising....my dogs italian greyhounds are very sympathetic and caring... they know when i feel down or sick and come and sit with me to comfort
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 12 8:45 PM
      this is generalising....my dogs italian greyhounds are very sympathetic and caring... they know when i feel down or sick and come and sit with me to comfort me..both my dogs have minds of their own...they are not controlled...i have had cats all my life too..all animals are great because there are no pretences... they are who they are... merle


      On 13/12/2012, at 10:01 AM, Anna wrote:



      I think it is about the smell.
      Dogs go outside, cats do it inside. But overall I find cats more easy pets. And just as loving as dogs. But also more independent.
      Maybe people want more obedient pets, this is why they go for dogs; you cannot bribe a cat.
      And you can travel with a dog, ride a truck, hunt, swim, fish, etc... With a cat, all you can do is make him purr. And he shows love by bringing you a dead mouse in turn.
      Still, they are wonderful animals and I believe that even smarter than dogs.   Rabbits are similarly smart. I have one, he is a house pet.  Uses a cat box and takes with me walks in my little garden to nibble on lettuce.   Recently started to guard the door and checks who comes in and out.
      Anna
       
      From: Julienne
      Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2012 4:39 AM
      Subject: [evol-psych] Millionaires Prefer Dogs
       


      -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Why Millionaires Prefer Dogs Over Cats

      CNBC

      By Robert Frank | CNBC 

      Dogs and millionaires have a lot in common. They are relentless opportunists (especially when it comes to rewards). They come in all shapes, sizes and colors. They defend their turf. And in general, they don't like cats. 

      [] 


      Perhaps that explains a new survey that shows that millionaires are far more dog-friendly than the rest of Americans.


      According to a study by Spectrem Group, 58 percent of millionaire pet owners have a dog. Only 37 percent own a cat. Only three percent keep fish, two percent birds and two percent have a horse. 


      Those stats are far more canine-leaning than the rest of the country. According to the Humane Society, 39 percent of U.S. households own a dog, compared to 33 percent of households that own a cat.


      Why have millionaires gone to the dogs?


      Jennifer Cona, a trust and estates attorney and partner with Genser Subow Genser & 

      Cona in New York, does a lot of work on pet trusts. She said that of all the pet trusts 

      she's worked on, 90 percent are for dogs and only 10 percent are for cats. (She's 

      written only one parakeet trust).

      [] 


      She said dogs provide one thing especially important to the wealthy: "unconditional love."

      "You don't get that from a cat," she said. "Dogs are like children for some families, except they don't mess up in college or run off with money. Sometimes it's easy to see why dogs are the favorite child."


      Plus, she says, millionaires know that dogs don't love them for their money.


      "It's unbiased love and money doesn't enter into the equation," she said. "That's important."

      Millionaires show their love for their dogs in part by their spending. One quarter of millionaire pet owners spend more than $1,000 a year on their pets every year, the Spectrem study said, while more than half spend more than $500 a year. 

      Many would say those numbers are understated, given all the diamond-dog collars, chateaubriand dog foods and booming dog spas in evidence these days. Not to mention the medical bills.


      The survey showed that 34 percent of pet owners spend money on grooming, while only 

      six percent spend on "sweaters, accessories, outfits and costumes."


      More than half of millionaire pet owners spend money on teeth cleaning for their pets. 

      More than 16 percent, meanwhile, said they would spend money on reconstructive knee surgery, hip surgery and "anti-anxiety, anti-depression" medication for their pets.


      Money, I suppose, can't buy happiness -- even for dogs.




      Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ from the prejudices of their social environment. Most people are even incapable of forming such opinions.
                  -- Albert Einstein




    • Anna
      Yes, animals are who they are. However, we mold them by making them our pets. And they learn from us how to be more like humans. Anna From: merle lester Sent:
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 12 10:23 PM
        Yes, animals are who they are. However, we mold them by making them our pets.  And they learn from us how to be more like humans.
        Anna
         
        Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2012 9:45 PM
        Subject: Re: [evol-psych] Millionaires Prefer Dogs
         
         

        this is generalising....my dogs italian greyhounds are very sympathetic and caring... they know when i feel down or sick and come and sit with me to comfort me..both my dogs have minds of their own...they are not controlled...i have had cats all my life too..all animals are great because there are no pretences... they are who they are... merle

         
        On 13/12/2012, at 10:01 AM, Anna wrote:



        I think it is about the smell.
        Dogs go outside, cats do it inside. But overall I find cats more easy pets. And just as loving as dogs. But also more independent.
        Maybe people want more obedient pets, this is why they go for dogs; you cannot bribe a cat.
        And you can travel with a dog, ride a truck, hunt, swim, fish, etc... With a cat, all you can do is make him purr. And he shows love by bringing you a dead mouse in turn.
        Still, they are wonderful animals and I believe that even smarter than dogs.   Rabbits are similarly smart. I have one, he is a house pet.  Uses a cat box and takes with me walks in my little garden to nibble on lettuce.   Recently started to guard the door and checks who comes in and out.
        Anna
         
        From: Julienne
        Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2012 4:39 AM
        Subject: [evol-psych] Millionaires Prefer Dogs
         


        -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Why Millionaires Prefer Dogs Over Cats

        CNBC

        By Robert Frank | CNBC 

        Dogs and millionaires have a lot in common. They are relentless opportunists (especially when it comes to rewards). They come in all shapes, sizes and colors. They defend their turf. And in general, they don't like cats. 

        [] 


        Perhaps that explains a new survey that shows that millionaires are far more dog-friendly than the rest of Americans.


        According to a study by Spectrem Group, 58 percent of millionaire pet owners have a dog. Only 37 percent own a cat. Only three percent keep fish, two percent birds and two percent have a horse. 


        Those stats are far more canine-leaning than the rest of the country. According to the Humane Society, 39 percent of U.S. households own a dog, compared to 33 percent of households that own a cat.


        Why have millionaires gone to the dogs?


        Jennifer Cona, a trust and estates attorney and partner with Genser Subow Genser & 

        Cona in New York, does a lot of work on pet trusts. She said that of all the pet trusts 

        she's worked on, 90 percent are for dogs and only 10 percent are for cats. (She's 

        written only one parakeet trust).

        [] 


        She said dogs provide one thing especially important to the wealthy: "unconditional love."

        "You don't get that from a cat," she said. "Dogs are like children for some families, except they don't mess up in college or run off with money. Sometimes it's easy to see why dogs are the favorite child."


        Plus, she says, millionaires know that dogs don't love them for their money.


        "It's unbiased love and money doesn't enter into the equation," she said. "That's important."

        Millionaires show their love for their dogs in part by their spending. One quarter of millionaire pet owners spend more than $1,000 a year on their pets every year, the Spectrem study said, while more than half spend more than $500 a year. 

        Many would say those numbers are understated, given all the diamond-dog collars, chateaubriand dog foods and booming dog spas in evidence these days. Not to mention the medical bills.


        The survey showed that 34 percent of pet owners spend money on grooming, while only 

        six percent spend on "sweaters, accessories, outfits and costumes."


        More than half of millionaire pet owners spend money on teeth cleaning for their pets. 

        More than 16 percent, meanwhile, said they would spend money on reconstructive knee surgery, hip surgery and "anti-anxiety, anti-depression" medication for their pets.


        Money, I suppose, can't buy happiness -- even for dogs.




        Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ from the prejudices of their social environment. Most people are even incapable of forming such opinions.
                    -- Albert Einstein




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