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Re: [evol-psych] Re: Gay and Lesbian Couples Do Well at Parenting

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  • Lynn Roarty
    Jeremy Bowman wrote: In a homosexual couple, at ... In the heterosexual situation, the step-parent usually arrives on the scene after the arrival of the child;
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 31, 2001
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      Jeremy Bowman wrote:

      In a homosexual couple, at
      > least one parent is a biological step-parent, and that is usually not good
      > news.

      In the heterosexual situation, the step-parent usually arrives on the scene
      after the arrival of the child; in the gay and lesbian situation, both
      partners are often intimately involved in the planning *for* the child. The
      average longevity of relationships cited in the article would support this
      view. Surely Daly & Wilson's data cannot be so unreflectively applied to
      this situation?

      > Parenting is
      > a form of power, and I feel that power is best wielded by those who do not
      > actively seek it. (snip) By contrast, homosexual
      > couples have to actively take steps to become parents,

      As do infertile heterosexual couples. Are their motives similarly suspect?
      Some feminist writers on reproductive technologies have slipped down this
      same slope which results in a (further)privileging of the bodies of the
      'naturally' fertile over the bodies of those who are not. The assumption
      that because

      JB: Many heterosexual couples (perhaps most) have parenthood
      thrust upon them as an inevitable result of carelessness and biology

      they in some way 'muddle through' and wield the 'power' of parenthood better
      derives from the unconsidered 'naturalness' of that parenthood, whether they
      have parenthood 'thrust upon them' or whether they plan a pregnancy - I
      suggest the more likely scenario in the first world at least. And yet the
      necessity for planning (as distinct from the choice to plan) calls the
      desire for the child into question for the infertile, and for gay & lesbian
      parents?

      I agree with you that the outcomes from a study based on self-reports of
      parenting are of limited value; but the more fundamental questions you raise
      surely require more reflection?

      Lynn Roarty
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