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Re: [evol-psych] Re: News: Cracking the epigenetic code, advancing our understanding of disease

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  • mark hubey
    On Oct 31, 2012 7:57 AM, ... Come on, now. I am sure you can interpret this very easily A = xy dA = xdy + ydx How much of the contribution to the change in A
    Message 1 of 62 , Oct 31, 2012
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      On Oct 31, 2012 7:57 AM,

      > An example sometimes given is the area of a rectangle. It is
      > nonsensical to ask about the separate contributions of length and width
      > to the area of a single rectangle because area is the product of length
      > and width.

      Come on, now. I am sure you can  interpret this very easily

      A = xy

      dA = xdy + ydx

      How much of the contribution to the change in A comes from change in x? 
      Obviously ydx.  If x, y are genes and environment then the change in genes is multiplied by env.

      Area does not exist without both length and width. [An

      > organism does not exist without genes and environment.] However, if we
      > ask, not about a single rectangle but about a population of rectangles,
      > the variance in areas could be due entirely to length, entirely to
      > width, or to both. Obviously, there can be no behavior without both an
      > organisms [and its genes] and an environment. The scientifically useful
      > question is the origins of differences among individuals.
      >
      > For example, the heritability of height is about 90 percent, but this
      > does not mean that you grew to 90 percent of your height for reasons of
      > heredity and that the other inches were added by the environment. What
      > it means is that most of the height differences among individuals are
      > due to the genetic differences among them. Heritability is a statistic
      > that describes the contribution of genetic differences to observed
      > differences among individuals in a particular population at a particular
      > time. In different populations or at different times, environmental or
      > genetic influences might differ, and the heritability estimates in such
      > populations would differ" (Plomin et al, Behavioral Genetics, Fifth
      > Edition, 2008, p. 85-6).
      >
      > --- In evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com, Edgar Owen
      >
      > <edgarowen@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Sonny,
      > >
      > > Correction. Taller parents tend to have taller children and vice
      > versa. Height IS CLEARLY HERITABLE.
      > >
      > > Why would anyone think otherwise?
      > >
      > > Edgar
      > >
      > ><snip>
      >
      >

    • Don Zimmerman
      ... DWZ: I wouldn t be surprised if they already have plans drawn up for a Gulag, so that when they seize power they will have a place to send the PC liberals.
      Message 62 of 62 , Nov 1, 2012
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        --- In evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com, "clarence_sonny_williams" <clarencew@...> wrote:

        > I am confident that those who scoff at such scientific facts have a
        > hidden sociopolitical agenda in mind. It is a shame they are so
        > cowardly about this sociopolitical agenda that they refuse to reveal it.


        DWZ:
        I wouldn't be surprised if they already have plans drawn up for a Gulag, so that when they seize power they will have a place to send the PC liberals. Fortunately, those dreams of power are about as plausible as their "scientific" theories.

        Best regards,

        Donald W. Zimmerman
        Vancouver, BC, Canada
        dwzimm@...
        http://www3.telus.net/public/a7a82899
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