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Re: Appeals to authority

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  • james kohl
    From: Robert Karl Stonjek Choice of sexuality has many sources with some of the strongest being cultural. These include people
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 24, 2012
    From: Robert Karl Stonjek <stonjek@...>
    Choice of sexuality has many sources with some of the strongest being cultural.  These include people choosing heterosexuality or asexuality because deviance from the accepted norm is punished severely.  There may be the selection to be gay because of the lifestyle advantages even if an individual is not attracted to the same gender sexually.
     
    Further, being heterosexual or gay (for instance) may not necessarily be concomitant with sexual preferences.  Many people living heterosexually, for instance, do not enjoy sex or find their sex life unfulfilling or uninspiring.  This may be the result of many different causes with choice of sexuality being one.
     
    Generally, the issue is complex and so can not be explained by your simple model.  However, non-reproductive sexual behaviour generally is accounted for if we consider a dual purpose of life and not, for instance, a single purpose where the purpose is to spread one's own personal DNA (where 'purpose' is used as an explanatory simplification rather than a statement of teleology).
    ---------------------------------------------
    JK: What is it about my model for the epigenetic tweaking of immense gene networks in superorganisms that solve problems through the exchange and the selective cancellation and modification of signals that you think is simple, Robert?

    I've included it as an attachment to help make it clear how an environmental drive evolved from that of food ingestion in unicellular organisms to that of socialization in insects. For example, the diagram is of a mammalian model because it is also clear that, in mammals, food odors and pheromones cause changes in hormones such as LH, which has developmental affects on sexual behavior in nutrient-dependent, reproductively fit individuals across species of vertebrates. The effects on hormones such as LH, and on behavior are driven by GnRH, as are the effects of exercise and endocrine disruptors on hormones and behavior.

    When you tell others that culture plays one of the strongest roles in c
    hoice of sexuality, you seem to be clearly indicating that you have not looked at any model for the development of sexual preferences during the past several decades of neuroscientific progress, which I have included in my model.

    James V. Kohl


     
  • james kohl
    From: Edgar Owen To: evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wed, October 24, 2012 5:21:10 AM Subject: Re: [evol-psych] Appeals to
    Message 2 of 9 , Oct 24, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      From: Edgar Owen <edgarowen@...>
      To: evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wed, October 24, 2012 5:21:10 AM
      Subject: Re: [evol-psych] Appeals to authority: was [Death Is Just An Illusion to The Andromeda Strain]

       

      Kohl is studying "sexual orientation in single-celled organisms"!

      I don't know whether to laugh or cry! Gay and lesbian bacteria?

      ----------------------------------------------------

      JK: I think you should stop displaying your ignorance.

      "Parenthetically it is interesting to note even the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a gene-based equivalent of sexual orientation (i.e., a-factor and alpha-factor physiologies). These differences arise from different epigenetic modifications of an otherwise identical MAT locus" -- with co-author Milton Diamond, who exposed the John/Joan (Nature vs Nurture) case -- a textbook misrepresentation that prevailed for decades among scientifically illiterate psychologists and fools. 

      Meanwhile, we were among the first to include anything about molecular epigenetics in a published work (from Hormones and Behavior).  Can anyone guess what causes the "different epigenetic modifications of an otherwise identical MAT locus" at the advent of sexual reproduction?
       
      James V. Kohl
      Medical laboratory scientist (ASCP)
      Independent researcher
      Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic influences on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 2: 17338.




      On Oct 23, 2012, at 9:09 PM, james kohl wrote:

       

      From: Robert Karl Stonjek <stonjek@...>

      I am currently working on a book on human behaviour including deviant behaviour and I am concentrating on the relationship between innate predispositions and subsequent behaviour.  In humans we no longer have clearly defined instincts but instead have heuristic innate predispositions ~ it is up to each of us to figure out how to satisfy innate predispositions which we feel as a drive, motivation, longing, ambition and so on.


      As I mentioned earlier this month to the psychiatry research group:


      JK: After conference presentations in the early 90's my book was published in 1995 and again in 2002; I co-authored a Hormones and Behavior review article in 1996, an award-winning review linking neuroendocrinology and ethology in 2001 with more presentations along the way and afterwards leading to an award-winning book chapter in the Handbook of the Evolution of Human Sexuality and my most recent paper Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic influences on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors.  The book chapter detailed the development of male homosexual preferences using the same model for the development of heterosexual preferences.


      Do you intend to address homosexuality as one of the deviant behaviors that develops from heuristic innate predispositions? It would be interesting to see how anyone could do this without starting with sexual orientation in single-celled organisms, as I did, and using my olfactory/pheromonal approach. It would be more interesting to learn if you have established yourself as an authority via any of the means you suggested I could use (all of which I have used to establish myself as an authority). 


      RKS wrote: "If you were, as you claim to be, a serious scientist then you would follow the same path to success as other scientists in the field of your choice i.e. publication of papers, attendance at conferences, especially giving presentations and speeches there, and the publication of a book/s outlining your entire theory and model so that it can discussed in universities and other interested groups."


      If you intend to stake a claim to being a serious scientist, you may want to scan some of what I've published to avoid coming off as just another evolutionary theorist who is forced to either ignore the evolution of human homosexuality or acknowledge there is only one model for that -- and it's my model, first discussed in a section titled Hormones, Pheromones, and Gender Orientation in the book I co-authored in 1995.



      James V. Kohl
      Medical laboratory scientist (ASCP)
      Independent researcher
      Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic influences on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 2: 17338.




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