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Re: [evil-psych] Re: [evil-psych] is it human nature to exploit others?

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  • Anna
    Ok, tell it to the police or war dogs that they are not intelligent. Or even better, dolphins. Do you know that dolphins have a language? Intelligence is a
    Message 1 of 72 , Apr 30 8:08 PM
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      Ok, tell it to  the police or war dogs  that they are not intelligent. Or even better, dolphins.  Do you know that dolphins have a language?
      Intelligence is a pattern making. Even robots can be intelligent. Yet dogs not? Then how do the wild dogs  decide what to do when   hungry?  Do they just wait until some hyena leaves them a rotten leftover? No, they hunt and usually in groups  and to do so, there must be some organization and planning.  My dogs crack nuts with their teeth and remove the meat to eat.  They open doors without being shown how.   They communicate with me very well too. I do not need to be close, I just get information in my mind that a dog  needs my help or   is sick even when he does not act sick and looks sick.
      You need to spend some time on a farm and get to know animals.  I  have pets, they are my family.
      Sure, some dogs and also other animals can be really  dumb, but some are very bright. People who show their dogs in obedience or hunting trials, breed for intelligence mainly. And they do it by inbreeding.
      That dogs are genetically close to people there is no doubt. This is the main reason why most genetic tests are done with dogs to  learn about humans.  So if humans are intelligent, why should not dogs?
       
      Anna
       
       
      Sent: Monday, April 30, 2012 11:45 AM
      Subject: [evol-psych] Re: [evil-psych] is it human nature to exploit others?
       
       



      --- In mailto:evolutionary-psychology%40yahoogroups.com, "Anna" <pantheon@...> wrote:

      > Sure, but basically and what
      every animal breeder can confirm is that if you want to have intelligent offspring, you need to breed two related intelligent individuals to each other. This is a fast and sure way. Considering that we do not exactly know what genes are responsible for intelligence, by outcrossing some of the components can get lost or not be present in another individual to match the same genetic components in another individual. The same apparent traits can be due to different genes.

      DWZ:
      Yes, I agree with what you are saying, although I have doubts about breeding for intelligence. Animal breeders certainly produce useful practical results, although the traits selected often are themselves poorly understood and the genes responsible for the traits cannot be identified. Nobody knows very much about the genetic basis of "animal intelligence." And no matter what is considered to be "intelligent behavior" on the part of animals, it is a big step from that behavior to a related concept in humans.

      Since "intelligence" at the human level presumably has a large, if not overwhelming environamental component, any kind of genetic selection for that particular poorly-understood trait would be very hit-and-miss at present. I am rather confident that no single codon, or even a combination of five or six codons, will be discovered as the determinant of "intelligence" at the human level--not in the way in which a genetic error based one a readily identifiable coding error determines a metabolic disease.

      Best regards,

      Donald W. Zimmerman
      Vancouver, BC, Canada
      mailto:dwzimm%40telus.net
      http://www3.telus.net/public/a7a82899


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    • mark hubey
      Maybe a dissociation of ignorant speculation from education will become a part of the human condition. ... -- Regards, Mark Hubey If it can t be expressed in
      Message 72 of 72 , May 2, 2012
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        Maybe a dissociation of ignorant speculation from education will become a part of the human condition.


        On Wed, May 2, 2012 at 4:46 PM, Don Zimmerman <dwzimm@...> wrote:
         

        --- In evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com, merle lester <bmlester@...> wrote:

        > love..is that a dirty word in the breeding department?..merle

        DWZ:
        Perhaps a dissociation of love and reproduction will become part of the human condition, like so many other activities that once were inseparable eventually came to be pursued independently of one another, as culture evolved. Who knows.

        Best regards,

        Donald W. Zimmerman
        Vancouver, BC, Canada
        dwzimm@...
        http://www3.telus.net/public/a7a82899




        --
        Regards,
        Mark Hubey

        "If it can't be expressed in figures, it is not science; it is opinion." — Robert Heinlein--Spoken by character Lazarus Long in Time Enough for Love (1973). In Leon E. Stover, Heinlein (1987)


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